Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 4 Results

  1. 1
    340425

    Prevention gap report.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2016. [286] p.

    Efforts to reach fewer than 500 000 new HIV infections by 2020 are off track. This simple conclusion sits atop a complex and diverse global tapestry. Data from 146 countries show that some have achieved declines in new HIV infections among adults of 50% or more over the last 10 years, while many others have not made measurable progress, and yet others have experienced worrying increases in new HIV infections.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    321122

    Engaging faith-based organizations in HIV prevention. A training manual for programme managers.

    Toure A; Melek M; Jato M; Kane M; Kajungu R

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 2007. [53] p.

    The influence behind faith-based organizations is not difficult to discern. In many developing countries, FBOs not only provide spiritual guidance to their followers; they are often the primary providers for a variety of local health and social services. Situated within communities and building on relationships of trust, these organizations have the ability to influence the attitudes and behaviours of their fellow community members. Moreover, they are in close and regular contact with all age groups in society and their word is respected. In fact, in some traditional communities, religious leaders are often more influential than local government officials or secular community leaders. Many of the case studies researched for the UNFPA publication Culture Matters showed that the involvement of faith-based organizations in UNFPA-supported projects enhanced negotiations with governments and civil society on culturally sensitive issues. Gradually, these experiences are being shared across countries andacross regions, which has facilitated interfaith dialogue on the most effective approaches to prevent the spread of HIV. Such dialogue has also helped convince various faith-based organizations that joining together as a united front is the most effective way to fight the spread of HIV and lessen the impact of AIDS. This manual is a capacity-building tool to help policy makers and programmers identify, design and follow up on HIV prevention programmes undertaken by FBOs. The manual can also be used by development practitioners partnering with FBOs to increase their understanding of the role of FBOs in HIV prevention, and to design plans for partnering with FBOs to halt the spread of the virus. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    282174

    HIV / AIDS in Asia and the Pacific Region, 2003.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for the Western Pacific; World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for South-East Asia

    Manila, Philippines, WHO, Regional Office for the Western Pacific, 2004. [117] p.

    The 2001 report on HIV/AIDS in Asia and the Pacific region published by the WHO Regional Offices for South-East Asia and the Western Pacific presented an overview of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, followed by a description of the general patterns and prevalence of HIV risk behaviours and HIV prevalence trends in the region, as well as in individual countries. This vast geographic region combines the WHO South-East Asia and Western Pacific Regions and contains 60% of the total world population. Thus, even low HIV infection rates in this region will contribute millions of additional people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) and deaths to the already staggering global toll of AIDS. This report provides an update on HIV/AIDS in the region and focuses on the continuing HIV prevalence trends noted in the previous report. It also noted some changes that may be occurring with regard to the public health surveillance and epidemiology of HIV/ AIDS. In addition, the epidemiological patterns of HIV, especially current HIV transmission dynamics, are described for each country. HIV is primarily a sexually transmitted infection (STI) and, as with all STI, the major driving force of the pandemic is heterosexual transmission. Although high rates of HIV infection (50% and higher) have been found and may still occur among injecting drug users (IDU) and men who have sex with men (MSM), more than 90% of the global total of estimated adult infections are due to heterosexual transmission. HIV/AIDS is present at varying prevalence levels in MSM in several regions of the world. Explosive spread of HIV still occurs among IDU populations worldwide and sexual transmission occurs throughout the world in both males and females, especially in those who have unprotected sex with multiple and concurrent partners, such as female sex workers (FSW). Extensive or epidemic heterosexual spread of HIV, affecting 1% or more of the sexually active population, has occurred in sub-Saharan countries, a few countries in the Caribbean and Central America, and a few countries in South and South-east Asia. Considering the presence of risk factors for HIV infection, such as high-risk behaviours and other sexually transmitted infections, and the vulnerability to HIV infection in the region, the major public health question is what actions need to be taken to maintain this low HIV prevalence. However, a response cannot be properly formulated without understanding the HIV epidemic status and trends in the region. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    136173

    Report on the global HIV / AIDS epidemic.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    [Geneva, Switzerland], UNAIDS, 1998 Jun. 75 p.

    Estimates by the Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) and the World Health Organization indicate that, by the beginning of 1998, 30.6 million people were infected with HIV and 11.7 million HIV-related deaths had occurred. During 1997, 5.8 million new HIV infections were reported and 2.3 million people died of AIDS. Also in 1997, almost 600,000 children were infected with HIV, primarily through their mothers before or during birth or through breast feeding. At present, there are 8.2 million AIDS orphans. 89% of people with HIV live in sub-Saharan Africa and the developing countries of Asia, which together account for less than 10% of the global gross national product. It will be a long time before the benefits conferred by combination antiretroviral therapy will be experienced in developing countries. Well-designed, carefully targeted prevention campaigns have been able to arrest or reverse HIV trends, however. The most effective campaigns work simultaneously on many levels, each initiative reinforcing the others. This UNAIDS report presents global estimates of the HIV/AIDS epidemic by the end of 1997 and summarizes current knowledge on AIDS orphans, the evolution of the AIDS epidemic in each world region, prevention efforts, injecting drug use and HIV, preventing sexual transmission of HIV among youth, HIV testing, HIV and mortality, treatment regimens, vertical transmission, and HIV/AIDS estimation techniques and indicators.
    Add to my documents.