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  1. 1
    302586

    Unite for children, unite against AIDS.

    Bolton S

    UN Chronicle. 2005 Dec; [2] p..

    The new campaign of the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), "Unite for Children, Unite against AIDS", hopes to focus global attention on the devastating impact that the HIV/AIDS pandemic has had on children. Ann Veneman, UNICEF Executive Director, in launching the campaign at UN Headquarters in New York on 25 October 2005, described what AIDS means to the youngest generation. "It is a disease that has redefined their childhoods, causing them to grow up too fast, or sadly not at all." In the worst-affected countries, where life expectancy has plummeted from the mid-60s to the early-30s, turning 18 no longer means reaching adulthood, but rather middle-age. A global campaign designed to strengthen the commitment to the fight against AIDS is crucial, explained Ms. Veneman, because "the scale of this problem is staggering, but the world has been largely unresponsive". "Unite for Children, Unite against AIDS" aims to prevent mother-to-child transmission, provide paediatric treatment, prevent infection among adolescents and young people, and protect and support children affected by HIV/AIDS. It also provides a platform for urgent and sustained programmes, advocacy and fund-raising to limit the impact of the disease on children and help halt its spread. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    296073

    A call to action. Children: the missing face of AIDS.

    UNICEF; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    New York, New York, UNICEF, 2005. 25 p.

    The world must take urgent account of the specific impact of AIDS on children, or there will be no chance of meeting Millennium Development Goals (MDG) 6 - to halt and begin to reverse the spread of the disease by 2015. Failure to meet the goal on HIV/AIDS will adversely affect the world's chances of progress on the other MDGs. The disease continues to frustrate efforts to reduce extreme poverty and hunger, to provide universal primary education, and to reduce child mortality and improve maternal health. World leaders, from both industrialized and developing countries, have repeatedly made commitments to step up their efforts to fight the spread of HIV/AIDS. They are beginning to increase the political leadership and the resources needed to fight the disease. Significant progress is being made in charting the past and future course of the pandemic, in providing free antiretroviral treatment to those who need it, and in expanding the coverage of prevention services. But children are still missing out. (excerpt)
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