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Your search found 6 Results

  1. 1
    340372

    90-90-90. On the right track towards the global target.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2016. [62] p.

    This report highlights best practices and provides examples of countries that are already coming close to achieving the 90–90–90 targets, which are that 90% of people living with HIV know their HIV status, 90% of people who know their HIV-positive status are accessing treatment and 90% of people on treatment have suppressed viral loads. The report outlines steps that are needed to expedite gains towards each of the three 90s. Technological and service delivery innovations rapidly need to be brought to scale, communities must be empowered to lead the push to end the epidemic, new resources must be mobilized to reach the final mile of the response to HIV and steps must urgently be taken to eliminate social and structural barriers to service access.
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  2. 2
    340843

    Consolidated guidelines on the use of antiretroviral drugs for treating and preventing HIV infection: What’s new. Policy brief.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2015 Nov. [20] p. (Policy Brief)

    The 2015 guidelines includes 10 new recommendations to improve the quality and efficiency of services to people living with HIV. Implementation of the recommendations in these guidelines on universal eligibility for ART will mean that more people will start ART earlier. The updated guidelines present both new recommendations and previous WHO guidance. They include clinical recommendations (“the what” of using ARVs for treatment and prevention) and service delivery recommendations to support implementation (“the how” of providing ARVs), organized according to the continuum of HIV testing, prevention, treatment and care. For the first time the guideline includes “good practice statements” on interventions whose benefits substantially outweigh the potential harms.
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  3. 3
    334986

    Consolidated guidelines on the use of antiretroviral drugs for treating and preventing HIV infection: Recommendations for a public health approach.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of HIV / AIDS; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2013. [272] p.

    The 2013 Consolidated guidelines on the use of antiretroviral drugs for treating and preventing HIV infection provide new guidance on the diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, the care of people living with HIV and the use of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs for treating and preventing HIV infection.
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  4. 4
    311779

    Instructions for applying to the Green Light Committee for access to second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs.

    Blondal K; Caminero JA; Cegielski P; Espinal MA; Jaramillo E

    [Geneva, Switzerland], World Health Organization [WHO], 2006. 15 p. (WHO/HTM/TB/2006.369)

    Controlling multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is one of the six components of the WHO Stop TB strategy. Although prevention must be the highest priority for TB control programmes, many countries have patients with drug-resistant TB who must be treated too. Such countries should take specific measures to gradually incorporate appropriate strategies for treatment of this form of tuberculosis into their programmes and prevent propagation of drug-resistant TB. Misuse of second-line anti-TB drugs results in further resistance to these same second-line drugs, creating incurable forms of tuberculosis. It is imperative that second-line anti-TB drugs are used wisely. The WHO Guidelines For The Programmatic Management of Drug Resistant Tuberculosis (herein after referred to as the Guidelines) provide recommendations for appropriate management of drug-resistant TB so as not to generate further drug resistance. To help programmes develop and implement develop and implement strategies for the management of drug resistant TB, the Green Light Committee for Access to Second-line Anti-tuberculosis Drugs (GLC) was created by WHO and its partners in January 2000. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    306766

    UNION World Congress on Lung Health in Paris, France, October 19 -October 22, 2005: trip report.

    Moore T; Zagorskiy A; Barillas E; Owunna C; Burn R

    Arlington, Virginia, Management Sciences for Health [MSH], Rational Pharmaceutical Management Plus, 2005 Oct 27. 19 p. (USAID Development Experience Clearinghouse DocID / Order No: PD-ACH-068; USAID Cooperative Agreement No. HRN-A-00-00-00016-00)

    Many national TB programs continue to encounter problems in providing quality TB medicines to patients when they need them. While lack of financial resources may be one constraint for procuring all TB medicines needed, national programs experience a host of other problems in pharmaceutical management. Strong pharmaceutical management is one of the key pillars to effective tuberculosis (TB) control; without appropriate selection, effective procurement, distribution, stock management and rational use of TB medicines and related supplies, individuals will not be cured of the disease and countries will not reach global targets. Management Sciences for Health's Rational Pharmaceutical Management Plus (RPM Plus) program funded by USAID in collaboration with Stop TB Partnership's Global TB Drug Facility (GDF) housed at World Health Organization (WHO) Geneva conducted a workshop at the 36th International UNION World Congress on Tuberculosis and Lung Health on October 19th 2005 at Paris, France. This is the fourth year MSH and GDF have collaborated in such an event at the UNION congress due to popular demand by national TB programmes and their partners. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    191613

    Scaling up antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings: treatment guidelines for a public health approach. Rev. ed.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of HIV / AIDS

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2003. 67 p.

    Currently, fewer than 5% of people in developing countries who need ART can access the medicines in question. WHO believes that at least 3 million people needing care should be able to get the medicines by 2005. This represents almost a tenfold increase. These treatment guidelines are intended to support and facilitate the proper management and scale-up of ART in the years to come by proposing a public health approach to achieve the goals. The key tenets of this approach are as follows. 1) Scaling-up of antiretroviral treatment programmes with a view to universal access, i.e. all persons requiring treatment as indicated by medical criteria should have access to it. 2) Standardization and simplification of ARV regimens so as to support the efficient implementation of treatment programmes in resource-limited settings. 3) Ensuring that ARV treatment programmes are based on scientific evidence in order to avoid the use of substandard protocols that compromise the outcomes of individual patients and create a potential for the emergence of drug-resistant virus. However, it is also important to consider the realities with respect to the availability of human resources, health system infrastructures and socioeconomic contexts so that clear and realistic recommendations can be made. (excerpt)
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