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Your search found 29 Results

  1. 1
    332323

    Bridging the gap. The role of monitoring and evaluation in evidence-based policy making.

    Segone M

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNICEF, Regional Office for CEE / CIS, 2008 Jan. [220] p. (Evaluation Working Papers Issue No. 12)

    This collection of articles by UNICEF brings together the vision and lessons learned from different stakeholders on the strategic role of monitoring and evaluation in evidence-based policymaking. These stakeholders are policymakers (as users of evidence) and researchers and evaluators (as suppliers of evidence). The use of strong evidence can achieve recognition of a policy issue, inform the design and choice of policy, forecast the future, monitor policy implementation, and evaluate policy impact.
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  2. 2
    329555

    HIV interventions for young people in the education sector.

    UNAIDS. Inter-Agency Task Team on HIV and Young People

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund, HIV/AIDS Branch, [2008]. 8 p. (Guidance Brief)

    This Brief has been developed by the Inter-Agency Task Team (IATT) on HIV and Young People1 to assist United Nations Country Teams (UNCT) and UN Theme Groups on HIV/AIDS in providing guidance to their staffs, governments, development partners, civil society and other implementing partners on HIV interventions for young people in the education sector. It is part of a series of seven global Guidance Briefs that focus on HIV prevention, treatment, care and support interventions for young people that can be delivered through different settings and for a range of target groups.
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  3. 3
    329554

    Community-based HIV interventions for young people.

    UNAIDS. Inter-Agency Task Team on HIV and Young People

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund, HIV/AIDS Branch, [2008]. 8 p. (Guidance Brief)

    This Brief has been developed by the Inter-Agency Task Team (IATT) on HIV and Young People1 to assist United Nations Country Teams (UNCT) and UN Theme Groups on HIV/AIDS in providing guidance to their staffs, governments, development partners, civil society and other implementing partners on community HIV interventions for young people. It is part of a series of seven global Guidance Briefs that focus on HIV prevention, treatment, care and support interventions for young people that can be delivered through different settings and for a range of target groups.
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  4. 4
    322872

    Decentralising HIV M&E in Africa. Country experiences and implementation options in building and sustaining sub-national HIV M&E systems, in the context of local government reforms and decentralised HIV responses.

    Fraser N; Ndiaye A; Gorgens-Albino M

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, Global HIV / AIDS Program, 2007 Aug. 10 p. (HIV / AIDS M&E -- Getting Results)

    In operationalising the 3rd of the Three Ones - One HIV M&E system, a growing number of countries in Africa are opting to decentralise their national HIV monitoring and evaluation (M&E) systems. This decentralization is primarily driven by other decentralisation processes happening within government, and by the fact that the HIV response itself is changing towards less centralized intervention and increased community ownership. Decentralisation of national HIV M&E systems is an arduous and resource intensive process, but experience has shown that it is essential to decentralise M&E functions as HIV services are rolled out. This note summarizes the experience of countries that are decentralizing their national HIV M&E systems and describes how it can be done. It defines decentralization, discusses the rationale and benefits of decentralizing the HIV response, and key factors to take into account when doing so. Decentralizing the HIV M&E system is linked to decentralizing the HIV response. The note describes how each of the 12 components of a HIV M&E system can be decentralized, with country examples. (author's)
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  5. 5
    322581

    Implementing the UN learning strategy on HIV / AIDS: sixteen case studies.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2007 Mar. 97 p. (UNAIDS/07.08E; JC1311E)

    In April 2003, the Committee of Cosponsoring Organizations of the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) approved a Learning Strategy to help UN system staff develop competence on HIV and AIDS. The goals of the Learning Strategy are: to develop the knowledge and competence of the UN and its staff so that they are able to best support national responses to HIV and AIDS; and to ensure that all UN staff members are able to make informed decisions to protect themselves from HIV and, if they are infected or affected by HIV, to ensure that they know where to turn for the best possible care and treatment. This includes ensuring that staff members fully understand the UN's HIV and AIDS workplace policies and how they are implemented. To support UN country teams to implement the Learning Strategy, Learning Facilitators were selected at country level and trained in a series of regional workshops. The Learning Facilitators were then expected to ensure - along with the country teams-that the standards of the Learning Strategy were realized. This report is comprised of UN HIV/AIDS Learning Strategy case studies from sixteen countries: Botswana, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Cape Verde, India, Indonesia, Macedonia, Madagascar, Morocco, Nigeria, the Pan American Health Organization headquarters (United States), Pakistan, Paraguay, Vienna (Austria), Viet Nam, and Yemen. It presents each country's unique experience in implementing the strategy since its adoption in 2003. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    320693

    Low credit: a report on the World Bank's response to HIV / AIDS in developing countries.

    Simms C

    London, England, ActionAid International, [2004]. 27 p. (P1625/01/04)

    UNAIDS estimated that in Africa in 2003, more than 2.3 million people died from AIDS, 3 million were newly infected and a total of 12 million children were orphaned. Antiretroviral drugs are reaching a mere 50,000 of those with AIDS in developing countries. The HIV/AIDS pandemic is clearly a human and developmental disaster. This paper looks at the response to the HIV/AIDS crisis by the World Bank as a key member of the international donor/lending community, a leader in the international health community, and as Africa's principal development partner. In its seminal document, Intensifying Action Against HIV/AIDS, the World Bank acknowledges both its special leadership role in fighting HIV/AIDS and the need that it be held accountable for its stewardship. (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    320243

    Joint UNFPA-UNICEF-WHO Meeting on Prevention and Control of Sexually Transmitted Infections in the Pacific, 8-11 November 2005, Nadi, Fiji.

    UNICEF Pacific; United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]. Office for the Pacific; World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for the Western Pacific

    Manila, Philippines. WHO, Regional Office for the Western Pacific, [2006]. [35] p. ((WP)HSI/ICP/HSI/3.5/001; Report Series No. RS/2005/GE/36(FIJ))

    The Joint UNFPA-UNICEF-WHO Meeting on Prevention and Control of Sexually Transmitted Infections in the Pacific was held at the Mocambo Hotel in Nadi, Fiji, from 8 to 11 November 2005 with the following objectives: to review the current sexually transmitted infection (STI) situation in the Pacific island countries and areas; to share experiences, lessons learnt and the latest developments in STI prevention and control; and to identify issues, gaps and key actions needed for effective prevention and control of STI in the Pacific island countries and areas. The programme included technical presentations, situation reports from countries and partners and open forum discussion across a broad range of issues related to the epidemiology, prevention and control of STIs: the status of STIs in countries in the Pacific region; new STI case management strategies; the role of laboratories in STI case management, screening and surveillance systems; special needs for dealing with STIs in high-risk groups like antenatal women, sex workers and their clients, and youth; the integration of STIs into reproductive health services; and Pacific STI networking, both current and planned. Meeting participants reached a number of conclusions and made recommendations. These included: recognition of the important individual and public health hazards that STIs present in the Pacific region; the special clinical and epidemiological challenges that are presented by chlamydiosis; the utility of syndromic case management in controlling STIs, the importance of STI intervention programmes targeting "core" and "bridging" groups; and the role of partnerships and STI networks in the Pacific region. Each participating country identified its immediate priority needs as well as priorities for regional support. (author's)
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  8. 8
    320241

    UNAIDS and WHO Consultation on Progress in Prevention and Care in the Context of the "3 By 5 Initiative" and the Perspective of Universal Access in the Western Pacific Region, 12-16 December 2005, Manila, Philippines. Report.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for the Western Pacific; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Manila, Philippines. WHO, Regional Office for the Western Pacific, [2006]. [44] p. ((WP)HSI/ICP/HSI/3.5/001; Report Series No. RS/2005/GE/45(PHL))

    The WHO Western Pacific Regional Office, in collaboration with the Joint United Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), organized the four-day UNAIDS and WHO Consultation on Progress in Prevention and Care in the Context of the "3 by 5" Initiative and the Perspective of Universal Access in the Western Pacific Region with the general objective that, by the end of the consultation, the participants would have: (1) reviewed progress made on prevention and care scale-up in the context of the "3 by 5" Initiative; (2) shared experiences among countries on the current performance of monitoring and evaluation systems related to HIV/AIDS care, treatment and support: (3) identified ways to strengthen the integration of HIV/AIDS prevention and care: and (4) defined the conditions and terms of reference of a partners technical working group on HIV/AIDS prevention and care scale-up in the Western Pacific Region. (excerpt)
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  9. 9
    320235

    Making commitments matter: a toolkit for young people to evaluate national youth policy.

    United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs

    New York, New York, United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, [2003]. [113] p.

    This Toolkit is meant for national youth organizations and/or representatives working with youth. It can be used as a tool to: Assess your country's progress in reaching the WPAY goals; Prioritize your organization's work, based on your findings; Initiate actions at the national level. This Toolkit should be used as a starting point for determining what your government, and civil society, has done to better the lives of young people, since 1995. In addition to providing methods for evaluating this progress, the Toolkit also contains concrete tools to further your youth work. As such, we hope that you will find it both informative and useful, and a good resource for your organization. (excerpt)
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  10. 10
    320223

    Sanitation and hygiene at the World Bank: an analysis of current activities.

    Kolsky P; Perez E; Vandersypen W; Jensen LO

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, Infrastructure Network, Water Supply and Sanitation Sector Board, 2005 Oct. [26] p. (Water Supply and Sanitation Working Notes No. 6)

    This report reviews the current World Bank portfolio in sanitation and hygiene. The Bank's sanitation activities, ranging from latrine promotion to the construction of wastewater treatment plants, address a number of development objectives including improved health, greater human dignity, and a more sustainable environment. This report looks particularly closely at the degree to which the Bank's activities support the achievement of the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) target of halving the fraction of the world's population without access to basic sanitation by 2015, and the constraints to increasing support to that aim. By current estimates over 2.6 billion people do not have access to basic sanitation and hygiene; this lack is a basic component of poverty, contributing as it does to 2 million child deaths a year, reduced school attendance, and a fundamental deprivation of human dignity. Meeting the MDG target will require a major increase in global investment to a level of at least US$ 2 billion per year. (excerpt)
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  11. 11
    313133

    Good policy and practice in HIV and AIDS and education. Booklet 1: Overview.

    Attawell K; Elder K

    Paris, France, UNESCO, 2006 May. 24 p. (Good Policy and Practice in HIV and AIDS and Education Booklet No. 1; ED-2006/WS/2; cld 26002)

    HIV and AIDS affect the demand for, supply and quality of education. In some countries, the epidemic is reducing demand for education, as children become sick or are taken out of school and as fewer households are financially able to support their children?s education. However, it is difficult to generalize about the impact of HIV and AIDS on educational demand and important not to make assumptions about declining enrolments. Lack of accurate data on this question is a problem. For example, in Botswana absenteeism rates are relatively low in primary schools and there is some evidence to show that orphans have better attendance records than non-orphans. In Malawi and Uganda, where absenteeism is high among all primary school age students, there is less difference in school attendance between orphans and non-orphans than expected . (excerpt)
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  12. 12
    313124

    Toolkit to combat trafficking in persons.

    United Nations. Office on Drugs and Crime. Anti-Human-Trafficking Unit

    Vienna, Austria, United Nations, Office on Drugs and Crime, 2006. [245] p.

    The present Toolkit was prepared because there is still much to be learned about what works best to prevent and combat human trafficking under various circumstances. It presents a selection of conceptual, legislative and organizational tools in use in different parts of the world. The Toolkit is based on the premise that the problem of trafficking in persons, whether at the national or local level, can only be addressed effectively on the basis of comprehensive strategies that are based on human rights and that take into account the transnational nature of the problem, the many associated criminal activities, the frequent involvement of organized criminal groups and the profound pain, fear and damage suffered by the victims. Although the Toolkit offers a few examples of comprehensive national strategies, most of the tools that it offers focus on one specific aspect of the comprehensive response required. Individual tools may be used to develop comprehensive strategies, or to augment or strengthen some of the essential components of existing ones. Many of these tools will need to be adapted to national or local circumstances. None of the tools, by itself, is sufficient to provide an effective response to the problem. (excerpt)
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  13. 13
    312818

    Gender, human rights and socioeconomic impact of AIDS in Brazil.

    de Oliveira RM

    Revista de Saude Publica / Journal of Public Health. 2006 Apr; 40 Suppl:80-87.

    The paper critically analyzes, from the gender standpoint, official results presented in the Brazilian government report to the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/ AIDS (UNAIDS). Specifically, the fulfillment of 2003 targets set forth in the United Nations Declaration of Commitment on HIV/AIDS, under the category of Human Rights and Reduction of the Economic and Social Impact of AIDS, are evaluated. Key concepts are highlighted, including indicators and strategies that may help civilian society better monitor these targets until 2010. (author's)
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  14. 14
    312473

    Advocacy, communication and social mobilization to fight TB : a 10-year framework for action.

    Deane J; Parks W

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2006. 93 p. (WHO/HTM/STB/2006.37)

    A significant scaling up of advocacy, communication and social mobilization (ACSM) will be needed to achieve the global targets for tuberculosis control as detailed in the Global Plan to Stop TB 2006--2015. In 2005, the ACSM Working Group (ACSM WG) was established as the seventh working group of the Stop TB Partnership to mobilize political, social and financial resources; to sustain and expand the global movement to eliminate TB; and to foster the development of more effective ACSM programming at country level in support of TB control. It succeeded an earlier Partnership Task Force on Advocacy and Communications. This work-plan focuses on those areas where ACSM has most to offer and where ACSM strategies can be most effectively concentrated to help address four key challenges to TB control at country level: Improving case detection and treatment adherence; Combating stigma and discrimination; Empowering people affected by TB; Mobilizing political commitment and resources for TB. (excerpt)
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  15. 15
    311697

    Campaigning with partners for the MDGs: a case study of Brazil.

    Dimitrova D; de Oliveira MC

    New York, New York, United Nations Development Programme [UNDP], [2005]. 14 p.

    The deepening of democratic institutions, gains in macroeconomic stability and rapid expansion of prosperity contribute to an overall encouraging context for sustainable development in Brazil. Yet, despite these numerous advances, real poverty has only moderately declined, and inequality persists. In Brazil, economic and social status tends to vary by geography, race and gender, a legacy of the country's history. Imposed and de facto colonial and post-colonial divisions among indigenous peoples and descendents of Portuguese settlers, African slaves and European, Middle Eastern and Asian immigrants created persistent structures of exclusion and inequality. In the 1950s, during the military government, a strategy of import substitution prioritized rapid industrial expansion, and helped to bring about significant, sustained economic growth. Benefits, however, accrued disproportionately to the upper classes at the expense of workers and unions. The industrialization contributed to the expansion of the favelas (urban slums), one of Brazil's greatest contemporary challenges, by promoting urban migration while infrastructure and social support did not expand at the same pace. (excerpt)
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  16. 16
    311833
    Peer Reviewed

    Rationale for developing a new international growth reference.

    Garza C; de Onis M

    Food and Nutrition Bulletin. 2004; 25 Suppl 1:S5-S14.

    The rationale for developing a new international growth reference derived principally from a Working Group on infant growth established by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1990. It recommended an approach that described how children should grow rather than describing how children grow; that an international sampling frame be used to highlight the similarity in early childhood growth among diverse ethnic groups; that modern analytical methods be exploited; and that links among anthropometric assessments and functional outcomes be included to the fullest possible extent. Upgrading international growth references to resemble standards more closely will assist in monitoring and attaining a wide variety of international goals related to health and other aspects of social equity. In addition to providing scientifically robust tools, a new reference based on a global sample of children whose health needs are met will provide a useful advocacy tool to health-care providers and others with interests in promoting child health. (author's)
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  17. 17
    311119

    Achieving the Millennium Development Goals in sub-Saharan Africa: a macroeconomic monitoring framework.

    Agenor PR; Bayraktar N; Moreira EP; El Aynaoui K

    World Economy. 2006; 29(11):1519-1547.

    3,000 Africans die every day of a mosquito bite. Can you think about that, malaria? That's not acceptable in the 21st century and we can stop it. And water-borne illnesses - dirty water takes another 3,000 lives - children, mothers, sisters . . . If we're to take this issue seriously, and we must, because in 50 years, you know, when they [G-8 Heads of State] look back at this moment . . . they'll talk about what we did or didn't do about this continent bursting into flames. It is the most extraordinary thing to watch people dying three in a bed, two on top and one underneath, as I have seen in Lilongwe, Malawi. I mean, it is an astonishing thing. And it's avoidable. It's an avoidable catastrophe. You saw what happened with the tsunami. You see the outpouring, you see the dramatic pictures. Well, there's a tsunami happening every month in Africa, but it's an avoidable catastrophe. It is not a natural calamity. (author's)
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  18. 18
    306766

    UNION World Congress on Lung Health in Paris, France, October 19 -October 22, 2005: trip report.

    Moore T; Zagorskiy A; Barillas E; Owunna C; Burn R

    Arlington, Virginia, Management Sciences for Health [MSH], Rational Pharmaceutical Management Plus, 2005 Oct 27. 19 p. (USAID Development Experience Clearinghouse DocID / Order No: PD-ACH-068; USAID Cooperative Agreement No. HRN-A-00-00-00016-00)

    Many national TB programs continue to encounter problems in providing quality TB medicines to patients when they need them. While lack of financial resources may be one constraint for procuring all TB medicines needed, national programs experience a host of other problems in pharmaceutical management. Strong pharmaceutical management is one of the key pillars to effective tuberculosis (TB) control; without appropriate selection, effective procurement, distribution, stock management and rational use of TB medicines and related supplies, individuals will not be cured of the disease and countries will not reach global targets. Management Sciences for Health's Rational Pharmaceutical Management Plus (RPM Plus) program funded by USAID in collaboration with Stop TB Partnership's Global TB Drug Facility (GDF) housed at World Health Organization (WHO) Geneva conducted a workshop at the 36th International UNION World Congress on Tuberculosis and Lung Health on October 19th 2005 at Paris, France. This is the fourth year MSH and GDF have collaborated in such an event at the UNION congress due to popular demand by national TB programmes and their partners. (excerpt)
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  19. 19
    305867

    Rational Pharmaceutical Management Plus. WHO Biregional Workshop on Monitoring, Training and Planning (MTP) for Improving Rational Use of Medicines, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, December 14-16, 2005: trip report.

    Walkowiak H

    Arlington, Virginia, Management Sciences for Health [MSH], Rational Pharmaceutical Management Plus, 2006 Jan 23. 53 p. (USAID Development Experience Clearinghouse DocID / Order No: PD-ACH-511; USAID Cooperative Agreement No. HRN-A-00-00-00016-00)

    The workshop on Monitoring, Training and Planning (MTP) for Improving Rational Use of Medicines was convened jointly by two World Health Organization (WHO) regional offices -- for the Western Pacific (WPRO) and South East Asia (SEARO). Recognizing that the problem-focused strategy of MTP has been field-tested in several countries and shown to have significant impact in reducing the overuse and misuse of antibiotics and injections, the second International Conference on Improving Use of Medicines held in Chaing Mai, Thailand from March 30 to April 2, 2004 recommended that the MTP strategy be scaled up and replicated in other countries. Ineffective and often harmful prescribing and use of medicines remains widespread in many countries in the Western Pacific and South-East Asia, and WHO is collaborating with Australian Government Overseas Aid Program (AusAID) to train participants from countries in the two regions to implement MTP. (excerpt)
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  20. 20
    300755

    HIV / AIDS, law and human rights: a handbook for Russian legislators.

    Narkevich MI; Polubinskaya SV

    Moscow, Russia, Transatlantic Partners Against AIDS, 2005. 52 p.

    The purpose of this Handbook is to assist members of the Federation Council and deputies of the State Duma of the Russian Federation, and other Russian officials on the federal and regional levels, in enacting appropriate legislation and legislative reform to address AIDS, whether they be initiatives prohibiting discrimination against PLWHA or members of highly vulnerable groups, laws guaranteeing reliable HIV prevention information for all Russian citizens, or other policy priorities — and ensuring adequate fiscal and other resources to support them. This Handbook provides examples of the best legislative and regulatory practices gathered from around the world. Best practices are given for each of the 12 guidelines contained in the International Guidelines on HIV/AIDS and Human Rights, published in 1998 by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (UNHCHR) and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS). The Handbook also presents detailed information on the Russian AIDS epidemic with regard to the establishment and implementation of these Guidelines. Most importantly, the Handbook outlines concrete recommendations on measures that legislators can take to protect human rights and promote public health in responding to the epidemic. (author's)
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  21. 21
    296466

    Commission gives high priority to monitoring global trends - UN Population Commission meeting, Mar 28-31, 1994 - includes information on preparation of action program to be recommended at the Sep 5-13, 1994 International Conference on Population and Development, Cairo, Egypt.

    UN Chronicle. 1994 Jun; 31(2):[3] p..

    The effect of population growth on the environment, the role and status of women, and the demographic implications of development Policies were among major topics discussed by the Population Commission at its twenty-seventh session (28-31 March, New York). "The most important lesson we have learned is that population growth and other demographic trends can only be affected by investing in people and by promoting equality between women and men", Dr. Nafis Sadik, Executive Director of the UN Population Fund (UNFPA) and Secretary-General of the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development, told the 26-member body. In the single text approved during the session, for adoption by the Economic and Social Council, the Commission asked that high priority be given to monitoring world population trends and policies, and to strengthening multilateral technical cooperation to address population concerns. (excerpt)
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  22. 22
    295845

    The "Three Ones" in action: where we are and where we go from here.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2005 May. 51 p. (UNAIDS/05.08E)

    Partners engaged in the global, national and local responses to AIDS have agreed on the "Three Ones"--one national AIDS framework, one national AIDS authority and one system for monitoring and evaluation--as guiding principles for improving the country-level response. This report describes how far the partners have moved from principle to practice and points to the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead. Its aim is to inform and provoke discussion and debate as all the partners--all levels of government, bilateral and multilateral donors, international institutions, and civil society--seek answers to the question, "How can we, individually and collectively, make optimal use of the limited resources available to us, improve our response to the AIDS epidemic and accelerate our progress toward achievement of the Millennium Development Goals?" (excerpt)
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  23. 23
    292493

    Are cost effective interventions enough to achieve the Millennium Development Goals? Money, infrastructure, and information are also vital [editorial]

    Wibulpolprasert S; Tangcharoensathien V; Kanchanachitra C

    BMJ. British Medical Journal. 2005 Nov 12; 331(7525):1093-1094.

    At a high level forum in Paris this month policy makers are meeting to discuss the financial sustainability and coordination of activities essential for achieving the millennium development goals. Building on other targets set in the 1990s, such as those at the 1990 UN children’s summit, these ambitious goals agreed by 189 countries aim to markedly reduce poverty and hunger and improve education and health throughout the world by 2015. But many less developed countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa and south Asia, are falling short of the target to reduce child mortality by 4.4% a year, the rate required to cut deaths among children less than 5 years old by two thirds (from the 1990 level) by 2015. (excerpt)
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  24. 24
    278445

    Indicators for monitoring the Millennium Development Goals: definitions, rationale, concepts and sources.

    United Nations Development Group

    New York, New York, United Nations, 2003 Oct. [111] p.

    This handbook contains basic metadata on the agreed list of quantitative indicators for monitoring progress towards the 8 goals and 18 targets derived from the Millennium Declaration. The list of indicators, developed using several criteria, is not intended to be prescriptive but to take into account the country setting and the views of various stakeholders in preparing country-level reports. Five main criteria guided the selection of indicators. They should: Provide relevant and robust measures of progress towards the targets of the Millennium Development Goals. Be clear and straightforward to interpret and provide a basis for international comparison. Be broadly consistent with other global lists and avoid imposing an unnecessary burden on country teams, governments and other partners. Be based to the greatest extent possible on international standards, recommendations and best practices. Be constructed from well-established data sources, be quantifiable and be consistent to enable measurement over time. The handbook is designed to provide the United Nations country teams and national and international stakeholders with guidance on the definitions, rationale, concepts and sources of the data for the indicators that are being used to monitor the Millennium Development Goals. Just as the indicator list is dynamic and will necessarily evolve in response to changing national situations, so will the metadata change over time as concepts, definitions and methodologies change. (excerpt)
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  25. 25
    275774

    “Three Ones” key principles . “Coordination of National Responses to HIV / AIDS”. Guiding principles for national authorities and their partners.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2004. 4 p.

    The HIV/AIDS pandemic is a genuine global emergency taking the lives of eight thousand people a day and threatening the lives of tens of millions more as the infection continues to spread around the world. New but still limited resources to respond to the needs of people living with HIV and AIDS and those at risk of infection will be utilized most efficiently if there is maximum coordination within the international community. To leverage resources and have the maximum impact on the global response to AIDS, all parties should strive to target their programmes on the priority needs of affected countries strive, seeking to avoid duplication of effort. (excerpt)
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