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Your search found 4 Results

  1. 1
    392520
    Peer Reviewed

    A Decade of Monitoring HIV Epidemics in Nigeria: Positioning for Post-2015 Agenda.

    Akinwande O; Bashorun A; Azeez A; Agbo F; Dakum P; Abimiku A; Bilali C; Idoko J; Ogungbemi K

    AIDS and Behavior. 2017 Jul; 21(Suppl 1):62-71.

    BACKGROUND: Nigeria accounts for 9% of the global HIV burden and is a signatory to Millennium Development Goals as well as the post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals. This paper reviews maturation of her HIV M&E system and preparedness for monitoring of the post-2015 agenda. METHODS: Using the UNAIDS criteria for assessing a functional M&E system, a mixed-methods approach of desk review and expert consultations, was employed. RESULTS: Following adoption of a multi-sectoral M&E system, Nigeria experienced improved HIV coordination at the National and State levels, capacity building for epidemic appraisals, spectrum estimation and routine data quality assessments. National data and systems audit processes were instituted which informed harmonization of tools and indicators. The M&E achievements of the HIV response enhanced performance of the National Health Management Information System (NHMIS) using DHIS2 platform following its re-introduction by the Federal Ministry of Health, and also enabled decentralization of data management to the periphery. CONCLUSION: A decade of implementing National HIV M&E framework in Nigeria and the recent adoption of the DHIS2 provides a strong base for monitoring the Post 2015 agenda. There is however a need to strengthen inter-sectoral data linkages and reduce the rising burden of data collection at the global level.
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  2. 2
    378969

    Progress with Scale-Up of HIV Viral Load Monitoring - Seven Sub-Saharan African Countries, January 2015-June 2016.

    Lecher S; Williams J; Fonjungo PN; Kim AA; Ellenberger D; Zhang G; Toure CA; Agolory S; Appiah-Pippim G; Beard S; Borget MY; Carmona S; Chipungu G; Diallo K; Downer M; Edgil D; Haberman H; Hurlston M; Jadzak S; Kiyaga C; MacLeod W; Makumb B; Muttai H; Mwangi C; Mwangi JW; Mwasekaga M; Naluguza M; Ng'Ang'A LW; Nguyen S; Sawadogo S; Sleeman K; Stevens W; Kuritsky J; Hader S; Nkengasong J

    MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 2016 Dec 02; 65(47):1332-1335.

    The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends viral load testing as the preferred method for monitoring the clinical response of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection to antiretroviral therapy (ART) (1). Viral load monitoring of patients on ART helps ensure early diagnosis and confirmation of ART failure and enables clinicians to take an appropriate course of action for patient management. When viral suppression is achieved and maintained, HIV transmission is substantially decreased, as is HIV-associated morbidity and mortality (2). CDC and other U.S. government agencies and international partners are supporting multiple countries in sub-Saharan Africa to provide viral load testing of persons with HIV who are on ART. This report examines current capacity for viral load testing based on equipment provided by manufacturers and progress with viral load monitoring of patients on ART in seven sub-Saharan countries (Cote d'Ivoire, Kenya, Malawi, Namibia, South Africa, Tanzania, and Uganda) during January 2015-June 2016. By June 2016, based on the target numbers for viral load testing set by each country, adequate equipment capacity existed in all but one country. During 2015, two countries tested >85% of patients on ART (Namibia [91%] and South Africa [87%]); four countries tested <25% of patients on ART. In 2015, viral suppression was >80% among those patients who received a viral load test in all countries except Cote d'Ivoire. Sustained country commitment and a coordinated global effort is needed to reach the goal for viral load monitoring of all persons with HIV on ART.
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  3. 3
    289232

    WHO approach to track HIV drug resistance emergence and transmission in countries scaling up HIV treatment [letter]

    Bertagnolio S; Sutherland D

    AIDS. 2005; 19(12):1329-1330.

    Treatment access programmes are currently expanding in resource-limited settings. The potential barriers to long-term success (such as intermittent drug supply, drug stock-outs, poor patient monitoring, incorrect prescribing practices and low adherence) as well as the need to begin programmes quickly to treat millions of individuals, have raised fears that the aggressive plan to roll out antiretroviral therapy (ART), particularly in Africa, may generate an epidemic of drug-resistant strains of HIV. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    127725
    Peer Reviewed

    A nationwide effort to systematically monitor HIV-1 diversity in Brazil: preliminary results.

    Galvao-Castro B; Couto-Fernandez JC; Mello MA; Linhares-de-Carvalho MI; Castello-Branco LR; Bongertz V; Ferreira PC; Morgado M; Sabino E; Tanuri A

    MEMORIAS DO INSTITUTO OSWALDO CRUZ. 1996 May-Jun; 91(3):335-8.

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Global Program on AIDS (GPA) organized the WHO Network for HIV-1 Isolation and Characterization to monitor HIV-1 variability. Brazil is one of the HIV vaccine trial sites selected by WHO-GPA. HIV-1 subtypes B, F, and C have thus far been found in the country. A study involving 235 Brazilian isolates found subtype B to prevail in 88.5% of cases, subtype F in 8.9%, and subtype C in 1.7%. 2 samples (0.9%) were variants resulting from a recombination between subtypes B and F. Further studies have found that Brazilian HIV-1 strains have genetic and antigenic differences compared to North American/European prototype strains, potentially affecting the success of immunoprophylactic programs based upon HIV-1 vaccine candidates currently proposed for testing in Brazil. A Brazilian Network for HIV-1 Isolation and Characterization (BNHIC) was thus established in March 1993, as part of the National Program of HIV/AIDS Vaccine Development and Evaluation. The BNHIC was organized upon a 3-tier basis including primary site, central reference laboratory, and secondary laboratories. The authors discuss efforts made to achieve network goals in Brazil.
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