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Your search found 5 Results

  1. 1
    311835
    Peer Reviewed

    Measurement and standardization protocols for anthropometry used in the construction of a new international growth reference.

    de Onis M; Onyango AW; Van den Broeck J; Chumlea WC; Martorell R

    Food and Nutrition Bulletin. 2004; 25 Suppl 1:S27-S36.

    Thorough training, continuous standardization, and close monitoring of the adherence to measurement procedures during data collection are essential for minimizing random error and bias in multicenter studies. Rigorous anthropometry and data collection protocols were used in the WHO Multicentre Growth Reference Study to ensure high data quality. After the initial training and standardization, study teams participated in standardization sessions every two months for a continuous assessment of the precision and accuracy of their measurements. Once a year the teams were restandardized against the WHO lead anthropometrist, who observed their measurement techniques and retrained any deviating observers. Robust and precise equipment was selected and adapted for field use. The anthropometrists worked in pairs, taking measurements independently, and repeating measurements that exceeded preset maximum allowable differences. Ongoing central and local monitoring identified anthropometrists deviating from standard procedures, and immediate corrective action was taken. The procedures described in this paper are a model for research settings. (author's)
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  2. 2
    311836
    Peer Reviewed

    Assessment of gross motor development in the WHO Multicentre Growth Reference Study.

    Wijnhoven TM; de Onis M; Onyango AW; Wang T; Bjoerneboe GE

    Food and Nutrition Bulletin. 2004; 25 Suppl 1:S37-S45.

    The objective of the Motor Development Study was to describe the acquisition of selected gross motor milestones among affluent children growing up in different cultural settings. This study was conducted in Ghana, India, Norway, Oman, and the United States as part of the longitudinal component of the World Health Organization (WHO) Multicentre Growth Reference Study (MGRS). Infants were followed from the age of four months until they could walk independently. Six milestones that are fundamental to acquiring self-sufficient erect locomotion and are simple to evaluate were assessed: sitting without support, hands-and-knees crawling, standing with assistance, walking with assistance, standing alone, and walking alone. The information was collected by both the children's caregivers and trained MGRS fieldworkers. The caregivers assessed and recorded the dates when the milestones were achieved for the first time according to established criteria. Using standardized procedures, the fieldworkers independently assessed the motor performance of the children and checked parental recording at home visits. To ensure standardized data collection, the sites conducted regular standardization sessions. Data collection and data quality control took place simultaneously. Data verification and cleaning were performed until all queries had been satisfactorily resolved. (author's)
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  3. 3
    286826

    Reproductive health in Iraq in need of rehabilitation.

    Population 2005. 2003 Dec; 5(4):9.

    A survey conducted by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), in collaboration with the International Center for Migration and Health, has tracked startling statistics regarding the health system in Iraq. According to UNFPA, the number of women who die from pregnancy and childbirth in Iraq has close to tripled since 1990. Among the causes of the reported 310 deaths per 100,000 live births in 2002 are bleeding, ectopic pregnancies and prolonged labor. In addition, stress and exposure to chemical contaminants are also partly to blame for the rise in miscarriages among Iraqi women. Access to medical facilities is becoming more difficult for women due to breakdowns in security and weakened communication and transport systems. This has caused nearly 65 per cent of Iraqi women to give birth at home, the majority without skilled help. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    276327
    Peer Reviewed

    Gender and monitoring the response to HIV / AIDS pandemic.

    DeLay P

    Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2004 Nov; 10(11):1979-1983.

    The mechanisms, techniques, and data sources used to monitor and evaluate global AIDS prevention and treatment services may vary according to gender. The Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS has been charged with tracking the response to the pandemic by using a set of indicators developed as part of the Declaration of Commitment endorsed at the U.N. General Assembly Special Session on AIDS in 2001. Statistics on prevalence and incidence indicate that the pandemic has increasingly affected women during the past decade. Women’s biologic, cultural, economic, and social status can increase their likelihood of becoming infected with HIV. Since 2000, global financial resources have increased to allow expansion of both prevention and treatment services through a number of new initiatives, such as the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria; the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief; and the World Bank MAP program. Programs should be monitored and evaluated to ensure these investments are used to maximum effect. Different types of data should be included when assessing the status of the HIV/AIDS epidemic and effectiveness of the response. Each of these “data streams” provides information to enhance program planning and implementation. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    101250

    WHO partograph cuts complications of labour and childbirth.

    SAFE MOTHERHOOD NEWSLETTER. 1994 Jul-Oct; (15):10.

    Use of the partograph during labor can prevent suffering and loss of life. The partograph records the progress of labor, especially the rate of cervical dilatation. WHO's partograph differentiates between the latent phase of labor (slow dilatation up to 2 cm) and the active phase, during which the cervix dilates by at least 1 cm/hour to full dilatation. The partograph can detect abnormal progression of labor. Then clinicians can either augment labor by administering oxytocin or, in extreme cases of prolonged or obstructed labor, perform a cesarean section. Use of the WHO partograph in 8 hospitals in Indonesia, Thailand, and Malaysia reduced postpartum infections (by 59%), the number of stillbirths, the amount of oxytocin augmentation, and unnecessary cesarean sections. Thus, the WHO partograph was able to differentiate labors requiring intervention from those not requiring intervention. WHO calls for health personnel to use its partograph and its management protocol, both in labor wards with the capabilities to manage labor complications and in health centers without these capabilities which can refer women with labor complications to a specialist facility.
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