Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 5 Results

  1. 1
    326797

    Gender equality as smart economics: a World Bank Group gender action plan (fiscal years 2007-10).

    World Bank

    [Washington, D.C.], World Bank, 2006 Sep. [29] p.

    This Action Plan seeks to advance women's economic empowerment in the World Bank Group's client countries in order to promote shared growth and accelerate the implementation of Millennium Development Goal 3 (MDG3 - promoting gender equality and women's empowerment). The Plan would commit the World Bank Group to intensify and scale up gender mainstreaming in the economic sectors over four years, in partnership with client countries, donors, and other development agencies. The Bank Group and its partners would increase resources devoted to gender issues in operations and technical assistance, in Results-Based Initiatives (RBIs), and in policy-relevant research and statistics. An assessment at the end of the four-year period would determine whether to extend the Action Plan's timeframe. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    321000

    Violence and the Millennium Development Goals [letter]

    Afifi M

    Lancet. 2007 Sep 22; 370(9592):1034.

    The association between domestic violence and the first five Millennium Development Goals is bidirectional. Violence has a negative effect on efforts to alleviate poverty (MDG 1), and poverty has been shown to increase the likelihood of violence. Similarly, education, women's empowerment, child mortality, and maternal health are all linked to domestic violence. Simwaka and colleagues discussed the association between women's empowerment and violence against women and poor access and control over resources, and recommended putting gender issues in the African agenda to achieve MDG 5. Hence, monitoring the progress in preventing violence should not be separated from monitoring the development process in developing countries. Other challenges such as discrimination, inequity, extremism, religious fanaticism, human rights violations, and the faded democracy process have hampered efforts to combat violence in these countries. Ammar stated that "Egypt would be able to combat public violence (eg, terrorism) better if it addresses co-occurrence of spousal and child abuse than by changing its school curriculum". Moreover, we will not be able to estimate properly the magnitude of domestic violence if its economic costs are not investigated. Therefore, the growing political will to take action against violence is not enough in itself, especially when women feel that spousal abuse is justified and when judges and lawyers are part of a culture that tolerates violence against women. (full text)
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    155710

    Monitoring human rights.

    Abram MB

    In: All of us. Births and a better life: population, development and environment in a globalized world. Selections from the pages of the Earth Times, edited by Jack Freeman and Pranay Gupte. New York, New York, Earth Times Books, 1999. 124-6.

    For populations to enjoy any of the economic fruits of development, access to political and civil rights must be observed. However, the main international body charged with protecting political and civil rights has in itself been misguided. Political gamesmanship, structural problems, and misguided priorities continue to plague the UN Commission on Human Rights. The Commission's mandate to discuss "civil liberties, the status of women, freedom of information, the protection of minorities, the prevention of discrimination on the basis of race, sex, language, or religion" has not been adequately upheld at the Commission sessions held in Geneva, Switzerland. Each country has its own agenda, which destroys the main goal of the Commission. In order for the Commission to be the preeminent human right forum, countries must cease their political posturing, strengthen conditions for state membership in the Commission, and address the world's most pressing human rights concerns.
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    146180

    [Advances and difficulties of Cairo] Los avances y las dificultades de El Cairo.

    GIRE. 1998 Mar; (16):2-4.

    The 184 governments represented at the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development in Cairo achieved consensus on a Program of Action with goals for the next 20 years. The Conference recognized that population policies could not be separated from the decisions of men and women regarding their human rights to sexuality and reproduction and that healthy economic and social development must consider the balance between population and environmental resources. Women in particular must be given information, sex education, and contraceptive methods to allow them to implement their reproductive choices. The participation of thousands of independently organized women in sessions preparing for the Cairo conference and in the conference itself facilitated the change of emphasis away from imposition of family planning goals and toward a more humanist demography centering on women. An accord at the Cairo conference called for the donor countries to contribute one-third of the resources needed to carry out the Program of Action. A regular flow of funds was observed in 1994 and 1995, but external aid began to decline in 1996. Every effort must be made to ensure that the goals of the Program of Action are met.
    Add to my documents.
  5. 5
    126647

    A comparison of approaches to institutionalizing gender in donor agencies.

    Sherchand B

    Washington, D.C., Futures Group, Gender in Economic and Social Systems Project [GENESYS], 1994 Oct. [2], 48 p. (GENESYS Special Study No. 17; USAID Contract No. PDC-0100-Z-00-9044-00)

    In order to reveal essential lessons learned about the process undertaken by major bilateral and multilateral donor agencies to institutionalize gender awareness in their organizational structure and programs and to define the scope of the remaining work in this area, this paper compares strategies of major agencies and assesses the degree to which these strategies have allowed the agencies to meet stated objectives. The first main section of the paper provides background information on the following issues: 1) the importance of recognizing women's dual productive and reproductive roles and of the concept of mainstreaming in the development of policies and plans of action; 2) the key structures and processes that enhance capacity for institutionalizing gender, including a commitment to raising awareness, the presence of a Women in Development (WID) office and/or staff, and WID training and research; 3) the process of incorporating gender issues into country programs and project cycles; 4) involving women in all stages of development programming; and 5) strategies for the future. The second section of the paper analyzes the institutionalization of gender issues into the development process funded by the bilateral donors (Australia, Canada, Denmark, Japan, Norway, Sweden, the UK and the US). Each analysis includes a look at the content and scope of the country's policy and plan of action, at organizational commitment to raising awareness, at efforts to build a knowledge base, at how gender issues are incorporated into programs and project cycles, and at efforts to bring women into the process. The same framework is applied to the consideration of multilateral donors (the African Development Bank, the Asian Development Bank, the Inter-American Development Bank, the World Bank, and the UN Development Programme) contained in the final section of the paper.
    Add to my documents.