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  1. 1
    375980

    The World Health Organization Code and exclusive breastfeeding in China, India, and Vietnam.

    Robinson H; Buccini G; Curry L; Perez-Escamilla R

    Maternal and Child Health. 2018 Sep 8; [11] p.

    Promoting exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) is a highly feasible and cost-effective means of improving child health. Regulating the marketing of breastmilk substitutes is critical to protecting EBF. In 1981, the World Health Assembly adopted the World Health Organization International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes (the Code), prohibiting the unethical advertising and promotion of breastmilk substitutes. This comparative study aimed to (a) explore the relationships among Code enforcement and legislation, infant formula sales, and EBF in India, Vietnam, and China; (b) identify best practices for Code operationalization; and (c) identify pathways by which Code implementation may influence EBF. We conducted secondary descriptive analysis of available national-level data and seven high level key informant interviews. Findings indicate that the implementation of the Code is a necessary but insufficient step alone to improve breastfeeding outcomes. Other enabling factors, such as adequate maternity leave, training on breastfeeding for health professionals, health systems strengthening through the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative, and breastfeeding counselling for mothers, are needed. Several infant formula industry strategies with strong conflict of interest were identified as harmful to EBF. Transitioning breastfeeding programmes from donor-led to government-owned is essential for long-term sustainability of Code implementation and enforcement. We conclude that the relationships among the Code, infant formula sales, and EBF in India, Vietnam, and China are dependent on countries' engagement with implementation strategies and the presence of other enabling factors.
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  2. 2
    311327
    Peer Reviewed

    Will the new WHO growth references do more harm than good?

    Binns C; Lee M

    Lancet. 2006 Nov 25; 368(9550):1868-1869.

    Exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months is the normal way to feed all infants. The new WHO growth reference released in April, 2006, is based on breastfed infants under optimum conditions. The sample is highly selected for the factors likely to promote growth in breastfed infants, and less than 10% of those initially surveyed were included in the final study. Most mothers and health professionals are concerned about their infants' growth, particularly for the first 6 months. If they believe their infants are not growing adequately, they are more likely to introduce supplementary foods, including "top-ups" with infant formula or even switching to formula completely. "Insufficient milk" is the most common reason for the early cessation of breastfeeding and mothers often self-diagnose this on the basis of perceived slower growth. (excerpt)
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