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Your search found 8 Results

  1. 1
    297794

    HIV and AIDS in the Caucasus region: a socio-cultural approach.

    Buckley C; Papoyan A; Arakelyan A; Bakshinyan E; Ismailova L

    Paris, France, UNESCO, Division of Cultural Policies and Intercultural Dialogue, Culture and Development Section, 2005. 85 p. (CLT/CPD/CAD-05/4A)

    Placing the HIV- and AIDS-related experiences of the countries of the southern Caucasus (Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia) into social and cultural perspective is uniquely important. Within these three 'second wave' countries of the former Soviet Union, alarming claims that 'drug-driven epidemics are spiralling out of control' run counter to the relatively low number of individuals officially identified as HIV positive. The proportionate increase in the number of individuals affected has been substantial each year since the late 1990s, yet HIV and AIDS remain poorly documented, misunderstood, and highly stigmatised in the region. Analyses of the social and cultural factors influencing the ability of these countries to determine national strategies, implement effective prevention programmes, and develop better monitoring systems can assist in rectifying the differences between dire future predictions and the current modest prevalence rates. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    292216

    Urban population trends.

    Oucho JO

    Habitat Debate. 2001 Jun; 7(2):[4] p..

    It is projected that the world population will rise from 5.7 billion in 1995 to 8.9 billion in 2050, growing at the rate of 1.3 per cent per annum in the period 1995- 2000 to 0.3 per cent per annum in the period 2045-2050. The assumption is that there will be a massive fertility decline in the majority of countries, a scenario expected to produce ageing populations, i.e. populations in which the proportion of children is declining and that of older persons is increasing. Voluntary and Forced Migration The world is polarized between the net-immigration in more developed countries and the net-emigration in the developing world. The developed world receives immigrants mainly from Asia and Latin America, and to a certain extent, Africa. Immigration patterns suggest that countries in Europe and North America are becoming less homogenous in terms of race and culture. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    129913

    From Nairobi to Beijing. Second review and appraisal of the implementation of the Nairobi Forward-Looking Strategies for the Advancement of Women. Report of the Secretary-General.

    United Nations. Secretary-General

    New York, New York, United Nations Publications, 1995. XXI, 366 p.

    This document contains the second review and appraisal of the Nairobi Forward-Looking Strategies (NFLS) for the Advancement of Women to the Year 2000 undertaken by the UN in preparation for the 1995 Fourth World Conference on Women (WCW). The book opens with an overview and an introductory section presenting the UN mandates and resolutions that pertain to this review. Section 1 then provides an overview of the current global economic and social framework in terms of 1) trends in the global economy and in economic restructuring as they relate to the advancement of women, 2) the gender aspects of internal and external migration, 3) trends in international trade and their influence on the advancement of women, and 4) other factors affecting the implementation of the NFLS. Section 2 discusses the following critical areas of concern: 1) the persistent and growing burden of poverty on women, 2) inequality in access to education and other means of maximizing the use of women's capacities, 3) inequality in access to health and related services, 4) violence against women, 5) the effects of armed or other kinds of conflict on women, 6) inequality in women's access to and participation in the definition of economic structure and policies and the productive process, 7) inequality between men and women in the sharing of power and decision-making, 8) insufficient mechanisms to promote the advancement of women, 9) lack of awareness of and commitment to recognized women's human rights, 10) insufficient use of the mass media to promote women's contributions to society, and 11) lack of adequate recognition and support for women's contribution to managing natural resources and safeguarding the environment. The final section details international action to implement the NFLS.
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  4. 4
    042469

    The Population Commission and demographic research: an overview.

    Stolnitz GJ

    POPULATION BULLETIN OF THE UNITED NATIONS. 1986; (19-20):27-34.

    8 papers are introduced, on demographic research carried out under the direction of the Population Commission: 1) Demographic estimates and projections: a review of the Population Division's provision of periodic assessments of global population growth. 2) Fertility and Family Planning (FP), describing UN research on fertility levels and FP behavior; 3) Mortality, describing the synthesizing of national and regional research on mortality issues; developing and disseminating of methods for improving estimates of levels, trends, and analysis standards in mortality and standards of analysis; and the bringing together of diverse researchers to discuss global mortality issues; 4) Urbanization and internal migration, dealing with estimates and projections; monitoring of trends; urban and metropolitan growth; demographic and socioeconomic aspects of urbanization and internal migration; 5) International migration, discussing statistics; levels and trends; policies; and socioeconomic aspects of migration; 6) The UN manuals for population analysis, describing the formulation of manuals to help governments with population research; 7) Interrelationships between population and development, an area of research where much work is still to be done, and which is now a major endeavor of the Division; and 8) Population Policy, reviewing UN efforts at policy formulation. Policy analysis has also emerged as a major part of the Division's work. The overview concludes with an identification of significant gaps in Division research work: in particular, in the study of internal migration and population aging, and in comparative studies on how population trends affect needs and targets in particular sectors.
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  5. 5
    200168

    Report of the Director-General. Growth and adjustment in Asia: issues of employment, productivity, migration and women workers.

    International Labour Office [ILO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, International Labour Office, 1985. iv, 127 p.

    This report presents the activities of the International Labour Office (ILO) in Asia for the 5 years since the ILO's Ninth Asian Regional Conference of 1980. The economic recession has severely affected socioeconomic development in many states. Per capita income has fallen in a number of poorer developing countries, due to rapid population growth. The impact of the recession has varied greatly; the average rate of growth of South East Asian economies in the 1980s was higher than those of other regions. However, the recession has inevitably brought about a fall in tax receipts and thus increased budget deficits. Technical cooperation remains a major means for the ILO to achieve its goals, but its technical cooperation program faces severe funding constraints now. Regional projects now promote technical cooperation among developing countries (TCDC). This report 1) highlights the major development issues of the 1980s in Asia, 2) reviews ILO operations in the region for 1980-1984, 3) summarizes TCDC activities and identifies the ways of promoting TCDC in the region, 4) considers the issues of Asian migrant workers and female employment, and 5) formulates conclusions. An appendix reports on actions taken on the conclusions and resolutions adopted by the Ninth Asian Regional Conference.
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  6. 6
    199874

    [Papers presented at the First Study Director's Meeting on Comparative Study on Demographic-Economic Interrelationship for Selected ESCAP Countries, 29 October-2 November 1984, Bangkok, Thailand]

    United Nations. Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific [ESCAP]

    [Unpublished, 1984]. [82] p.

    This study group report 1) investigates quantitatively the process of population change and socioeconomic development to identify policy recommendations for Malaysia, the Philippines, and Thailand and 2) examines the application of the "systems approach" and econometric technics for population and development planning. These country-specific studies will help to clarify the interrelationships between demographic and socioeconomic factors in the development process of each participating country and the UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) region in general. The meeting 1) reviewed major demographic and economic issues in each participating country, 2) reviewed extant work on model building in each country, and 3) outlined a preliminary system design. Several economic-demographic models are discussed. The participants recommended that 1) the models focus of similar issues such as migration and income distribution and 2) countries should adopt, whenever possible, a similar modeling methodology. Participants agreed that models should be based, where possible, on a base-year Social Accounting Matrix (SAM). This poses no problems in Thailand or Malaysia as SAMs are already available for these countries. However, no SAM is currently available for the Philippines. Participants further recommended that the 3 models could be improved by greater collaboration among study directors during model formulation and estimation. Participants also expressed concern about the size of the computing budget and thought that models could be improved by an increased budget for computer time.
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  7. 7
    266048

    Population and development: a progress report on ILO research on population, labour, employment and income distribution. 4th ed.

    International Labour Office [ILO]. World Employment Programme

    Geneva, Switzerland, International Labour Office, April, 1982. 98 p.

    Discusses the work of the International Labour Organization's (ILO) policies on labor employment and income distribution. It aims to further study the interrelationships between demographic change and employment, and incomes and poverty, with a view to contributing to policy design, analysis and choice. The economic-demographic relationship is viewed as being of primary importance in its effect on social systems. The program plans to identify the causes and consequences of temporary migration by means of a detailed sample survey. This project discusses women's productive activities and demographic issues. The former includes all activities which contribute to economic well being, whether or not they are market-oriented, and the latter includes fertility, mortality, and migration. It also attempts to analyze the variety of processes through which population and poverty are related. Other issues discussed are fertility, the economic roles of children, and aspects of household behavior. Current research projects of the ILO are listed.
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  8. 8
    267143

    Report to the General Assembly, statement made to the Second Committee of the United Nations General Assembly at its Thirty-seventh Session, United Nations, New York, 5 October 1982.

    Salas RM

    New York, N.Y., UNFPA, [1982]. 7 p. (Speech Series No. 82)

    This statement highlights the UNFPA's activities for 1981 and discusses some of the current issues facing the international population community. Specifically, income in 1981 totalled US$125.5 million, project allocations totalled US$131.2 million, expenditures totalled US$136.4 million, project implementation rate was 93.3%, and 209 new projects were approved in 1981. Some of the major concerns of the UNFPA's program of assistance are family planning programs, rapid urbanization and the need for new policies, social policies for the increasing number of aged, research in internal and international migration, programs involving participation of women, community participation in family planning programs, and biomedical research.
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