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  1. 1
    142058

    Statement. ESCAP population activities: 1998-1999.

    United Nations. Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific [ESCAP]

    [Unpublished] 1999. Presented at the United Nations Commission on Population and Development, Thirty-second session, New York, New York, March 22-31, 1999 2 p.

    In this document a statement concerning the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) population for the years 1998-99 is presented. The work of ESCAP has focused on (1) the strengthening of monitoring and evaluation systems for measuring progress in reproductive health and family planning programs; (2) the strengthening of policy analysis and research on female migration, employment, family formation, and poverty; and (3) aging implications for Asian families and the elderly. ESCAP's programs constitute adequate strategies, policies and measures for problem solving in the area of population and development. They involve the organization of training courses, seminars and workshops in developing countries. ESCAP, with additional support from bilateral resources, has continued to implement a number of projects dealing with such issues as the effect of globalization on population change and poverty in rural areas.
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  2. 2
    268443

    Report on the evaluation of SEN/77/P04: population/socio-spatial/regional planning (population/amenagement du territoire).

    Fabri MY; Pool DI; Simonen M

    New York, New York, United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA], 1984 Dec. xiii, 34, [7] p.

    The Senegal population/socio-spatial/regional planning project illustrates a truly integrated approach to population and development planning. The evaluation Mission concluded overall that the project's achievements are positive. The project's main accomplishments have been the establishment of a sophisticated population data bank, the preparation of national and regional population projections, an analysis of migration movements, and the production of related maps and tables using primarily 2ndary data sources. The technical quality and detail of the work undertaken, as well as its potential usefulness, were high. However, the Mission also found that various constraints specific to this project have considerably limited its achievements. These include inadequately formulated project objectives and planned activities, poorly defined conceptual framework, low absorptive capacity of the implementing agency, and severe United Nations Fund for Population Activities budget reductions. The value of the work was found to be lessened because the data assembled have not yet been systematically integrated into other relevant data banks, properly disseminated or utilized. The Mission recommended measures which will help conserve the valuable data bank and other results of the project and will assist in the transfer to nationals of the knowledge and skills to update and utilize the data bank. Limited outside assistance--financial and technical--is needed for some of the recommended measures.
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  3. 3
    267155

    Confronting the population problem, statement made at 1983 Editors' Seminar at the United Nations, sponsored by the United Nations Association of the United States of America, United Nations, New York, 19 September, 1983.

    Salas RM

    New York, N.Y., UNFPA, [1983]. 8 p. (Speech Series No. 98)

    Growth and distribution of population carry important implications for resources and the environment, as well as for development generally. A shortage of food supply, increased labor force, urbanization and migration all pose staggering problems for the world. Other issues to be considered are energy, housing needs, as well as the vast array of raw materials which modern civilizations require. The demands on natural resources and the environment made by industrial development, combined with changes in population size and distribution create an issue of vital importance to developed and developing countries alike. With the aim of recognizing and working towards solutions to these and other problems, an International Conference on Population has been called in Mexico City in 1984. The Conference is expected to result in proposals for action in the national and international communities to produce the conditions necessary for continued decline in population growth and management of the problems which gorwth has brought about. The specific issues to be discussed at the Conference are briefly outlined.
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