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Your search found 7 Results

  1. 1
    332935

    Human resources for health: a gender analysis.

    George A

    [Johannesburg, South Africa], University of the Witwatersrand, Centre for Health Policy, Health Systems Knowledge Network, 2007 Jul. [58] p.

    In this paper I discuss gender issues manifested within health occupations and across them. In particular, I examine gender dynamics in medicine, nursing, community health workers and home carers. I also explore from a gender perspective issues concerning delegation, migration and violence, which cut across these categories of health workers. These occupational categories and themes reflect priorities identified by the terms of reference for this review paper and also the themes that emerged from the accessed literature. This paper is based on a desk review of literature accessed through the internet, search engines, correspondence with other experts and reviewing bibliographies of existing material. These efforts resulted in a list of 534 articles, chapters, books and reports. Although most of the literature reviewed was in English, some of it was also in Spanish and Portuguese. Material related to training and interpersonal patient-provider relations that highlights how occupational inequalities affect the availability and quality of health care is covered by other review papers commissioned by the Women and Gender Equity Knowledge Network. (Excerpt)
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  2. 2
    331969

    State of world population 2009. Facing a changing world: women, population and climate.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 2009. 94 p.

    Women bear the disproportionate burden of climate change, but have so far been largely overlooked in the debate about how to address problems of rising seas, droughts, melting glaciers and extreme weather, concludes The State of World Population 2009, released by UNFPA, the United Nations Population Fund. The poor are especially vulnerable to the effects of climate change, and the majority of the 1.5 billion people living on $1 a day or less are women. The poor are more likely to depend on agriculture for a living and therefore risk going hungry or losing their livelihoods when droughts strike, rains become unpredictable and hurricanes move with unprecedented force. The poor tend to live in marginal areas, vulnerable to floods, rising seas and storms. The report draws attention to populations in low-lying coastal areas that are vulnerable to climate change and calls on governments to plan ahead to strengthen risk reduction, preparedness and management of disasters and address the potential displacement of people. Research cited in the report shows that women are more likely than men to die in natural disasters-including those related to extreme weather -- with this gap most pronounced where incomes are low and status differences between men and women are high. The State of World Population 2009 argues that the international community's fight against climate change is more likely to be successful if policies, programmes and treaties take into account the needs, rights and potential of women. The report shows that investments that empower women and girls -- particularly education and health -- bolster economic development and reduce poverty and have a beneficial impact on climate. Girls with more education, for example, tend to have smaller and healthier families as adults. Women with access to reproductive health services, including family planning, have lower fertility rates that contribute to slower growth in greenhouse-gas emissions in the long run.
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  3. 3
    327186
    Peer Reviewed

    Legal aspects of conflict-induced migration by women.

    Macklin A

    Reproductive Health Matters. 2008 May; 16(31):22-32.

    This paper surveys the international legal frameworks, including the many guidelines, handbooks, resolutions, toolkits, conclusions and manuals produced by various United Nations bodies, that confirm an awareness of the protection issues specific to women and girls displaced by conflict. It explores the extent to which these documents address the gendered impacts of conflict-induced migration, and the role of United Nations bodies as international governmental organisations in implementing these norms. The main focus is upon internally displaced women and women refugees. In addition to problems of enforcing compliance with existing guidelines, the paper concludes that two areas - developing strategies to accommodate the realities of long-term, even permanent displacement and enhancing women's literal and legal literacy - require much greater attention on the part of governmental and non-governmental international organisations. (author's)
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  4. 4
    182006

    Changing trends and major issues in international migration: an overview of UNESCO programmes.

    Timur S

    International Social Science Journal. 2000 Sep; 165:255-268.

    This article gives an overview of related UNESCO activities over the past 50 years. Numerous UNESCO publications, results of various conferences, symposia and experts meetings serve to remind us of the important role that international migration has played in the process of social transformations throughout the world. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    141984

    Proposals for key actions for the further implementation of the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development. Report of the Secretary-General.

    United Nations. Secretary-General

    [Unpublished] 1999. 20 p. (E/CN.9/1999/PC/4; 99-05549(E) 150399)

    This article presents proposals for key actions for the further implementation of the Program of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD). The paper presents the results and principal findings of a series of extensive reviews of improvements made and constraints encountered in implementing the Program of Action. The report is organized into seven sections, each of which outlines key future actions necessary to meet the goals and achievements agreed at the ICPD and endorsed by the General Assembly. The introductory section briefly outlines the major new focus on human well being, human rights, reproductive health, and women's empowerment embodied in the Program of Action. Section 1 focuses on population and development concerns including major population trends; changing age structure and aging of the population; internal and international migration; poverty, economic development and environment; population and education; and data systems and indicators. Section 2 explores gender equality, equity and women's empowerment, while section 3 discusses reproductive rights and reproductive health. Section 4 and 5 focus on collaborations and partnerships and mobilization of resources, respectively. Finally, section 6 derives some conclusions from the review.
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  6. 6
    142039

    Statement on Agenda 3: Follow-up actions to the recommendations of the ICPD (E/CN.9/1999/3).

    Pierce CS

    [Unpublished] 1999. Presented at the United Nations Commission on Population and Development, Thirty-second session, New York, New York, March 22-31, 1999 [4] p.

    This is a statement by the Deputy Director of the Technical and Policy Division of the UN Population Fund (UNFPA) on the Report of the Technical Symposium on International Migration and Development of the Administration Committee on Coordination Task Force on Basic Social Services for All. The technical symposium served as a forum for an objective discussion and assessment of approaches to international migration issues facing policy makers in both countries of origin and destination. The presentations provided insights on fostering orderly migration flows, counteracting the economic and social marginalization of migrants, and increasing the focus on the human rights and gender dimensions of migration issues. The Symposium underscored the impact of globalization of capital and trade flows and the emergence of regional economic cooperation modalities on migration. The importance of remittance was identified as a mechanism that influenced the development of international migration. Furthermore, the issues of irregular migration and irregular employment were presented, and the need to improve the situation of migrants and foreign residents in receiving countries were discussed. In addition, the Technical Symposium provided an objective examination of key policy issues in international migration and development. It emphasized the need to increase international cooperation in the development of an approach for orderly migration management that takes into consideration, human rights and gender issues. Lastly, it drew attention to both the media and education as important elements in the creation of a more positive attitude towards migration.
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  7. 7
    129913

    From Nairobi to Beijing. Second review and appraisal of the implementation of the Nairobi Forward-Looking Strategies for the Advancement of Women. Report of the Secretary-General.

    United Nations. Secretary-General

    New York, New York, United Nations Publications, 1995. XXI, 366 p.

    This document contains the second review and appraisal of the Nairobi Forward-Looking Strategies (NFLS) for the Advancement of Women to the Year 2000 undertaken by the UN in preparation for the 1995 Fourth World Conference on Women (WCW). The book opens with an overview and an introductory section presenting the UN mandates and resolutions that pertain to this review. Section 1 then provides an overview of the current global economic and social framework in terms of 1) trends in the global economy and in economic restructuring as they relate to the advancement of women, 2) the gender aspects of internal and external migration, 3) trends in international trade and their influence on the advancement of women, and 4) other factors affecting the implementation of the NFLS. Section 2 discusses the following critical areas of concern: 1) the persistent and growing burden of poverty on women, 2) inequality in access to education and other means of maximizing the use of women's capacities, 3) inequality in access to health and related services, 4) violence against women, 5) the effects of armed or other kinds of conflict on women, 6) inequality in women's access to and participation in the definition of economic structure and policies and the productive process, 7) inequality between men and women in the sharing of power and decision-making, 8) insufficient mechanisms to promote the advancement of women, 9) lack of awareness of and commitment to recognized women's human rights, 10) insufficient use of the mass media to promote women's contributions to society, and 11) lack of adequate recognition and support for women's contribution to managing natural resources and safeguarding the environment. The final section details international action to implement the NFLS.
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