Your search found 9 Results

  1. 1
    374425

    Sustainable Development Goals and Family Planning 2020.

    Dockalova B; Lau K; Barclay H; Marshall A

    London, United Kingdom, International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF], 2016 Jun. 12 p.

    Governments have agreed a range of commitments to advance sustainable development, including promoting women’s and girls’ health and protecting human rights for all. Global commitments are important as they set a framework for funding to flow towards a particular issue and influence national development strategies and programming. As advocates, we can use global commitments to encourage coordination across national development plans, to push for funding and to increase political buy-in. This factsheet will focus on the linkages between the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and Family Planning 2020 (FP2020) commitments.
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  2. 2
    374424

    Climate change: time to "think family planning." An advocacy toolkit for family planning advocates.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]; Population & Sustainability Network

    [London, United Kingdom, IPPF], 2016. 21 p.

    Family planning is a critical, human rights-based, and cost-effective approach to climate change adaptation and resilience building. The aims of the paper are for national family planning advocates to be better placed to ensure: (a) national development (including climate change) planning processes include greater emphasis on family planning; and (b) more “climate change programmes” include family planning actions, therefore increasing overall investment and action in reproductive health. After defining “climate change” and introducing the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, 10 arguments are summarised which national family planning advocates are encouraged to employ, to suit their national contexts, to further these aims.
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  3. 3
    374423

    Climate change: time to "think family planning." A communications toolkit for family planning advocates.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]; Population & Sustainability Network

    [London, United Kingdom, IPPF], 2016. 9 p.

    This paper asserts that family planning is a critical, human rights-based, and cost-effective approach to climate change adaptation and resilience building. The aims of the paper are for national family planning advocates to be better placed to ensure: (a) national development plans (including climate change planning processes) include greater emphasis on voluntary family planning; and (b) more “climate change programmes” and strategies include family planning actions, therefore increasing overall investment and action in reproductive health. The accompanying policy paper summarises strategies which family planning advocates are encouraged to employ, to suit their national contexts, to further these aims. This Communications Toolkit summarises how those arguments can be edited into key messages and how those key messages can be used to reach advocacy targets in the run up to COP22, the next Climate Change Conference, to be held in Marrakech, Morocco, from 7 to 18 November 2016.
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  4. 4
    310247

    New data on male circumcision and HIV prevention: policy and programme implications. WHO / UNAIDS Technical Consultation. Male Circumcision and HIV Prevention: Research Implications for Policy and Programming, Montreux, 6-8 March 2007. Conclusions and recommendations.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2007 Mar 28. 10 p.

    At the end of 2006, an estimated 39.5 million people were living with HIV and 4.3 million became newly infected with the virus that year. Prevention must be greatly prioritized in the response to AIDS and efforts are being made to find new prevention technologies to bolster the package of already known effective prevention methods. Male circumcision is one of these new potential methods, along with vaginal microbicides, pre-exposure prophylaxis with antiretroviral medication, herpes suppressive therapy, cervical barrier methods and HIV vaccines. A number of observational studies indicate that circumcised men have lower levels of HIV infection than uncircumcised men. On 13 December 2006, the United States of America National Institutes of Health announced that two trials assessing the impact of male circumcision on HIV risk would be stopped on the recommendation of the Data Safety and Monitoring Board. The trials being carried out in Kisumu, Kenya, and Rakai District, Uganda revealed at least a 53%and 51% reduction in risk of acquiring HIV infection, respectively. These results support findings published in 2005 from the South Africa Orange Farm Intervention Trial, sponsored by the French National Agency for Research on AIDS, which demonstrated at least a 60% reduction in HIV infection among men who were circumcised. WHO and UNAIDS convened an international consultation to review the results of the three randomised controlled trials and other evidence on male circumcision and HIV prevention, to discuss the policy and programme implications, and to make recommendations regarding public health issues. This document summarizes the principal conclusions and recommendations of the meeting. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    309241

    Getting the message across: the mass media and the response to AIDS.

    Armstrong S

    Geneva, Switzerland, Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS], 2005 Dec. 56 p. (UNAIDS Best Practice Collection; UNAIDS/05.29E)

    For this report, a UNAIDS consultant visited South Africa to interview a wide range of people working on the frontline, from project managers, researchers and media executives, to film-makers, audience groups, and people living with HIV who present their own programmes. The aim was to find out not just what has to be done in practical terms, but to gain some insight into the thrills and frustrations of working in the tough environment of the mass media, and to discover the secrets of survival and success. The organizations have very different histories, target audiences and ways of working, and represent a wide range of experience. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    297797

    UNESCO's response to HIV and AIDS.

    UNESCO. International Institute for Educational Planning. HIV / AIDS Coordination Unit; UNESCO. Bureau for Field Coordination

    Paris, France, UNESCO, International Institute for Educational Planning, HIV / AIDS Coordination Unit, 2005. 42 p. (IIEP/Oct.2005/UHIV/UNESRES/01.R1)

    UNESCO's distinctive combination of expertise in education, science, social sciences, culture and communications gives it an interdisciplinary organizational and technical capacity that is particularly suited to working on education for prevention in an effort to halt the spread of HIV and AIDS. With all its partners, UNESCO has adopted a strong advocacy role for issues relating to HIV and AIDS. It is emphasising the linkages between HIV and AIDS education and poverty eradication; overcoming the disadvantages and disparities experienced by women and girls; supporting the understanding and practice of human rights; and adapting messages to diverse cultural and traditional contexts. This work is being carried out within the context of achieving the goals and targets of the Education for All (EFA) effort and the Declaration of Commitment on HIV/AIDS, adopted at the United Nations General Assembly Special Session on HIV/AIDS (UNGASS). UNESCO is strengthening its engagement with regional, sub-regional and national institutions for a better coordination of efforts to support locally owned plans and strategies for responding to HIV and AIDS. When dealing with education ministries, UNESCO ensures that its support for HIV and AIDS education accords with the financial, management and programme framework of the country's educational plans, in particular those relating to EFA goals and HIV and AIDS prevention. (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    297792

    If only. Zambia.

    Mangoye VL

    [Paris, France], UNESCO, 2004 Jul. 15 p. (Literacy, Gender and HIV / AIDS Series)

    This booklet is one of an ever-growing series of easy-to-read materials produced at a succession of workshops supported by UNESCO and UNFPA. The workshops are based on the appreciation that gender-sensitive literacy materials are powerful tools for communicating messages on HIV/AIDS to poor rural people, particularly illiterate women and out-of-school girls. Based on the belief that HIV/AIDS is simultaneously a health and a social cultural and economic issue, the workshops train a wide range of stakeholders in HIV/AIDS prevention including literacy, health and other development workers, HIV/AIDS specialists, law enforcement officers, material developers and medial professionals. Before a workshop begins, the participants select their target communities and carry out needs assessment of their potential readers. At the workshops, participants go through exercises helping them to fine-tune their sensitivity to gender issues and how these affect people's risks of HIV/AIDS. The analysis of these assessments at the workshops serves as the basis for identifying the priority issues to be addressed in the booklets. They are also exposed to principles of writing for people with limited reading skills. Each writer then works on his or her booklet with support from the group. (excerpt)
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  8. 8
    297791

    Arrange my marriage, arrange my death. Zambia.

    Phiri S

    [Paris, France], UNESCO, 2004 Jul. 13 p. (Literacy, Gender and HIV / AIDS Series)

    This booklet is one of an ever-growing series of easy-to-read materials produced at a succession of workshops supported by UNESCO and UNFPA. The workshops are based on the appreciation that gender-sensitive literacy materials are powerful tools for communicating messages on HIV/AIDS to poor rural people, particularly illiterate women and out-of-school girls. Based on the belief that HIV/AIDS is simultaneously a health and a social cultural and economic issue, the workshops train a wide range of stakeholders in HIV/AIDS prevention including literacy, health and other development workers, HIV/AIDS specialists, law enforcement officers, material developers and medial professionals. Before a workshop begins, the participants select their target communities and carry out needs assessment of their potential readers. At the workshops, participants go through exercises helping them to fine-tune their sensitivity to gender issues and how these affect people's risks of HIV/AIDS. The analysis of these assessments at the workshops serves as the basis for identifying the priority issues to be addressed in the booklets. They are also exposed to principles of writing for people with limited reading skills. Each writer then works on his or her booklet with support from the group. (excerpt)
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  9. 9
    291294

    The MDGs: condoms as disease prevention, not just contraception [editorial]

    Ratzan SC

    Journal of Health Communication. 2005; 10:375-378.

    The review of the UN Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) this fall poses an opportunity to focus on and galvanize interest in health development. The MDGs are a framework of 8 goals, 18 targets, and 48 indicators with a target goal for attainment of 2015. These development goals were adopted by a consensus of experts from the United Nations Secretariat and the International Monetary Fund (IMF), organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), and the World Bank. While health is directly reflected in three of the eight MDGs and eight of the 18 accompanying indicators, progress is choppy. Of course, the linkage of health as the foundation for the achievement of all the MDGs may seem to be an obvious antecedent as well as a sequela for development. No single pathogen or disease, however, appears to be ravaging unabated more than HIV=AIDS. HIV=AIDS continues to pose a significant drag on development indicators of those countries most affected. It has become a fundamental threat, not only to the health—and survival—of more than 25 million currently infected individuals in Africa, but also to the entire health system and workforce as well as overall governance, security, education, debt relief, economic development, and peace. (excerpt)
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