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  1. 1
    027442

    Health and health services in Judaea, Samaria and Gaza 1983-1984: a report by the Ministry of Health of Israel to the Thirty-Seventh world Health Assembly, Geneva, May 1984.

    Israel. Ministry of Health

    Jerusalem, Israel, Ministry of Health, 1984 Mar. 195 p.

    Health conditions and health services in Judea, Samaria, and Gaza during the 1967-83 period are discussed. Health-related activities and changes in the social and economic environment are assessed and their impact on health is evaluated. Specific activities performed during the current year are outlined. The following are specific facets of the health care system that are the focus of many current projects in these districts; the development of a comprehensive network of primary care programs and centers for preventive and curative services has been given high priority and is continuing; renovation and expansion of hospital facilities, along with improved staffing, equipment, and supplies for basic and specialty health services increase local capabilities for increasingly sophisticated health care, and consequently there is a decreasing need to send patients requiring specialized care to supraregional referral hospitals, except for highly specialized services; inadequacies in the preexisting reporting system have necessitated a continuting process of development for the gathering and publication of general and specific statistical and demographic data; stress has been placed on provision of safe drinking water, development of sewage and solid waste collection and disposal systems, as well as food control and other environmental sanitation activities; major progress has been made in the establishment of a funding system that elicits the participation and financial support of the health care consumer through volunary health insurance, covering large proportions of the population in the few years since its inception; the continuing building room in residential housing along with the continuous development of essential community sanitation infrastructure services are important factors in improved living and health conditions for the people; and the health system's growth must continue to be accompanied by planning, evaluation, and research atall levels. Specific topics covered include: demography and vital statistics; socioeconomic conditions; morbidity and mortality; hospital services; maternal and child health; nutrition; health education; expanded program immunization; environmental health; mental health; problems of special groups; health insurance; community and voluntary agency participation; international agencies; manpower and training; and planning and evaluation. Over the past 17 years, Judea, Samaria, and Gaza have been areas of rapid population growth and atthe same time of rapid socioeconomic development. In addition there have been basic changes in the social and health environment. As measured by socioeconomic indicators, much progress has been achieved for and by the people. As measured by health status evaluation indicators, the people benefit from an incresing quantity and quality of primary care and specialty services. The expansion of the public health infrastructure, combined with growing access to and utilization of personal preventive services, has been a key contributor to this process.
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  2. 2
    079529

    The work of WHO 1990-1991. Biennial report of the Director-General to the World Health Assembly and to the United Nations.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 1992. xi, 184 p.

    WHO reports that people are healthier and live longer than in the past, but considerable disability remains. The WHO Director-General lists several 1990-1991 WHO-hosted international forums to develop strategies to address proper food and nutrition, integrated disease control, human health and the changing environment, information dissemination, and intensified health development activities. The biennial report's first chapter covers governing bodies. Chapter 2 discusses WHO's general program development and management. Chapters 3-8 examine WHO's strategy for health for all, health system development, public information and education for health, organization of health systems based on primary health care, development of human resources for health, and research promotion and development. The chapter on general health protection and promotion discusses women, health, and development; food and nutrition; oral health; accident prevention; and tobacco. Chapter 10 focuses on maternal and child health and family planning, adolescent health, human reproduction research, occupational health, and health of the aged. Chapters 11-13 address protection and promotion of mental health, promotion of environmental health, and diagnostic, therapeutic, and rehabilitative technology. The disease prevention and control chapter examines immunization, vector borne diseases control (e.g., malaria), tropical disease research, diarrhea, leprosy, zoonoses, acute respiratory infections, tuberculosis, sexually transmitted diseases, AIDS, and the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Health information support and support services comprise chapters 15-16. The last 6 chapters are dedicated to the regional offices in Africa, the Americas, South-east Asia, Europe, Eastern Mediterranean, and the Western pacific. There are 5 annexes.
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  3. 3
    045568

    Sexuality and family planning: report of a consultation and research findings.

    Langfeldt T; Porter M

    Copenhagen, Denmark, World Health Organization, Regional Office for Europe, 1986. 62 p.

    A Consultation on Sexuality was convened by the Regional Office for Europe of the World Health Organization (WHO) in Copenhagen in November 1983 to examine the sexual dimensions of health problems. Sexuality influences thoughts, feelings, actions, and interactions and thus physical and mental health. Since health is a fundamental human right, so must sexual health also be a basic human right. 3 basic elements of sexual health were identified: 1) a capacity to enjoy and control sexual and reproductive behavior in accordance with social and personal ethics; 2) freedom from fear, shame, guilt, false beliefs, and other psychological factors inhibiting sexual response and impairing sexual relationships; and 3) freedom from organic disorders, diseases, and deficiencies that interfere with sexual and reproductive functions. The purpose of sexual health care should be the enhancement of life and personal relationships, not only counseling or care related to procreation and sexually transmitted diseases. Barriers to sexual health include myths and taboos, sexual stereotypes, and changing social conditions. In addition, sexuality is repressed among groups such as the mentally handicapped, the physically disabled, the elderly, and those in institutions whose sexual needs are not acknowledged. Homosexuals are often stigmatized because their sexual expression is at variance with dominant cultural values. Sex education programs and health workers must broaden their traditional approach to sexual health so they can help people to plan and achieve their own goals. Family planning programs must expand from their traditional goal of avoiding unwanted births and help people balance the need for rational planning on the one hand and the satisfaction of irrational sexual desires on the other hand. Promoting sexual health is an integral part of the promotion of health for all.
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