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Your search found 4 Results

  1. 1
    314633

    Political Declaration on HIV / AIDS. Draft resolution submitted by the President of the General Assembly.

    United Nations. General Assembly

    New York, New York, United Nations, General Assembly, 2006 Jun 2. 8 p. (A/60/L.57)

    We, Heads of State and Government and representatives of States and Governments participating in the comprehensive review of the progress achieved in realizing the targets set out in the Declaration of Commitment on HIV/AIDS, held on 31 May and 1 June 2006, and the High-Level Meeting, held on 2 June 2006. Note with alarm that we are facing an unprecedented human catastrophe; that a quarter of a century into the pandemic, AIDS has inflicted immense suffering on countries and communities throughout the world; and that more than 65 million people have been infected with HIV, more than 25 million people have died of AIDS, 15 million children have been orphaned by AIDS and millions more made vulnerable, and 40 million people are currently living with HIV, more than 95 per cent of whom live in developing countries. Recognize that HIV/AIDS constitutes a global emergency and poses one of the most formidable challenges to the development, progress and stability of our respective societies and the world at large, and requires an exceptional and comprehensive global response. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    296430

    How we define poverty - eradicating extreme poverty and hunger. [Definición de la pobreza: Erradicación de pobreza y hambre extremos]

    Blanco RO

    UN Chronicle. 2002 Dec; 39(4):[3] p..

    To talk about poverty and define it empirically seem like an easy task from the privileged point of view of the cultured and educated, or by means of moderate or highly acquired capacity that makes it possible to distinguish the parameters that identify it. By 2003, there will be over two billion poor people in the world fighting for survival. My colleagues and Dominican acquaintances, through their own experiences, agree on the definition of poverty as the total absence of opportunities, accompanied by high levels of undernourishment, hunger, illiteracy, lack of education, physical and mental ailments, emotional and social instability, unhappiness, sorrow and hopelessness for the future. Poverty is also characterized by a chronic shortage of economic, social and political participation, relegating individuals to exclusion as social beings, preventing access to the benefits of economic and social development and thereby limiting their cultural development. The United Nations has established that poverty and excluded people exist in all regions of the world; therefore, there is a diversity of reasons why people cannot satisfy their basic needs. It also concluded that two conditions--social and individual--limit the possibility of access to resources, knowledge and benefits, to fulfill human needs. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    183451

    School-age children: their nutrition and health.

    Drake L; Maier C; Jukes M; Patrikios A; Bundy D

    SCN News. 2002 Dec; (25):4-30.

    This paper addresses the most common nutrition and health problems in turn, assessing the extent of the problem; the impact of the condition on overall development, and what programmatic responses can be taken to remedy the problem through the school sys- tern. The paper also acknowledges that an estimated 113m children of school-age are not in school, the majority of these children living in Sub-Saharan Africa and South-East Asia. Poor health and nutrition that differentially affects this population is also discussed. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    184758
    Peer Reviewed

    Variation in incidence of serious adverse events after onchocerciasis treatment with ivermectin in areas of Cameroon co-endemic for loiasis.

    Twum-Danso NA; Meredith SE

    Tropical Medicine and International Health. 2003 Sep; 8(9):820-831.

    Objective: To determine the incidence of serious adverse events (SAEs) after mass treatment with ivermectin in areas co-endemic for loiasis and onchocerciasis, and to identify potential risk factors associated with the development of these SAEs, in particular encephalopathic SAEs. Methods: We retrospectively analysed SAEs reported to have occurred between 1 December 1998 and 30 November 1999 in central-southern Cameroon by chart review, interview and examination of a subset of patients. Results: The overall incidence of SAEs for the three provinces studied was 6 per 100,000. However, for Central Province alone the incidence of SAEs was 2.7 per 10,000 overall, and 1.9 per 10,000 for encephalopathic SAEs associated with Loa loa microfilaremia (PLERM). The corresponding rates for the most severely affected district within Central Province (Okola) were 10.5 per 10,000 and 9.2 per 10,000 respectively. Symptoms began within the first 24–48 h of ivermectin administration but there was a delay of approximately 48–84 h in seeking help after the onset of symptoms. First-time exposure to ivermectin was associated with development of PLERM. Conclusion: In Cameroon, the incidence of SAEs following ivermectin administration in general, and PLERM cases in particular, varies substantially by district within the areas co-endemic for loiasis and onchocerciasis. More intense surveillance and monitoring in the first 2 days after mass distribution in ivermectin-naïve populations would assist in early recognition, referral and management of these cases. The increased reporting of SAEs from Okola is unexpected and warrants further investigation. Research is urgently needed to find a reliable screening tool to exclude individuals (rather than communities) at risk of PLERM from the mass treatment program. (author's)
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