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Your search found 5 Results

  1. 1
    378468

    The mental health of HIV-positive adolescents.

    Kidia K; Ndhlovu C; Jombo S; Abas M; Makadzange AT

    Lancet. Psychiatry. 2015 Jun; 2(6):487-8.

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  2. 2
    303236

    Some important health statistics available in various countries.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Division of Epidemiological and Health Statistical Services

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 1954; 11:201-228.

    The information contained in the table that follows was obtained from a questionnaire sent by WHO in June 1953 to all Member States in order to elicit information on the types of health statistics and related vital statistics that are available in different countries, how they are obtained, and to what extent they are made available to the international organizations. The questionnaire asked for information on causes of death, causes of foetal death, and notifiable diseases, in addition to the subjects listed in the table. It will be seen that only a certain number of countries answered fully that part of the questionnaire with which we are concerned here. The reason is fairly obvious: statistics pertaining to health in its various aspects are numerous, varied, and scattered among many government departments apart from the health administrations--for instance, among the ministries of social welfare (social insurance returns, hospital statistics), of defence (army, navy, and air force health statistics), and of education (school medical inspection, number of students and graduates in medicine and in allied professions). To compile a complete inventory of existing health statistics would require many months of patient search in publications and reports and correspondence with the many national administrations concerned. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    183451

    School-age children: their nutrition and health.

    Drake L; Maier C; Jukes M; Patrikios A; Bundy D

    SCN News. 2002 Dec; (25):4-30.

    This paper addresses the most common nutrition and health problems in turn, assessing the extent of the problem; the impact of the condition on overall development, and what programmatic responses can be taken to remedy the problem through the school sys- tern. The paper also acknowledges that an estimated 113m children of school-age are not in school, the majority of these children living in Sub-Saharan Africa and South-East Asia. Poor health and nutrition that differentially affects this population is also discussed. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    184758
    Peer Reviewed

    Variation in incidence of serious adverse events after onchocerciasis treatment with ivermectin in areas of Cameroon co-endemic for loiasis.

    Twum-Danso NA; Meredith SE

    Tropical Medicine and International Health. 2003 Sep; 8(9):820-831.

    Objective: To determine the incidence of serious adverse events (SAEs) after mass treatment with ivermectin in areas co-endemic for loiasis and onchocerciasis, and to identify potential risk factors associated with the development of these SAEs, in particular encephalopathic SAEs. Methods: We retrospectively analysed SAEs reported to have occurred between 1 December 1998 and 30 November 1999 in central-southern Cameroon by chart review, interview and examination of a subset of patients. Results: The overall incidence of SAEs for the three provinces studied was 6 per 100,000. However, for Central Province alone the incidence of SAEs was 2.7 per 10,000 overall, and 1.9 per 10,000 for encephalopathic SAEs associated with Loa loa microfilaremia (PLERM). The corresponding rates for the most severely affected district within Central Province (Okola) were 10.5 per 10,000 and 9.2 per 10,000 respectively. Symptoms began within the first 24–48 h of ivermectin administration but there was a delay of approximately 48–84 h in seeking help after the onset of symptoms. First-time exposure to ivermectin was associated with development of PLERM. Conclusion: In Cameroon, the incidence of SAEs following ivermectin administration in general, and PLERM cases in particular, varies substantially by district within the areas co-endemic for loiasis and onchocerciasis. More intense surveillance and monitoring in the first 2 days after mass distribution in ivermectin-naïve populations would assist in early recognition, referral and management of these cases. The increased reporting of SAEs from Okola is unexpected and warrants further investigation. Research is urgently needed to find a reliable screening tool to exclude individuals (rather than communities) at risk of PLERM from the mass treatment program. (author's)
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  5. 5
    267274

    Apartheid and health. Part I. Report of an international conference held at Brazzaville, People's Republic of the Congo, 16-20 November 1981. Part II. The health implications of racial discrimination and social inequality: an analytical report to the conference.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 1983. 258 p.

    This mongraph is organized into 2 parts. Part I includes an introduction consisting od election of officers, method of work, and participants. Opening statements by Comlan A. A. Quenum, Regional Director for Africa, World Health Organization (WHO); Alfred Nzo, Secretary-General of the African National Congress; John Nyati Pokela, Chairman of the Pan Africanist Congress of Azania; Iyambo Indongo, Secretary of Health, South West Africa People's Organization; and Halfdan Mahler, Director-General, World Health Organization are given. The main themes of discussion were the choice between health or apartheid, an analysis of the system of health care delivery in South Africa, and the interrealtionships between apartheid and maternal and child health, workers' health, and mental health. In the course of its discussions the Conference reached a consensus on the following: 1) direction, coordination, and management; 2) health systems infrastructure; and 3) health science and technology. The strategy for health for all by the year 2000 in the African Region, action against apartheid and its harmful effects on health development is discussed, as is the place of the struggle against apartheid in regional and global strategies. The Brazzaville Declaration is given. In Pari II, the health implications of racial discrimination and social inequality are discussed. An introduction is given and the nature of apartheid is discussed, as is the origin of South African society and its health care system. Living conditions and disease patterns, the extent and effect of malnutrition, the impact of apartheid on psychosocial development, occupational health and disease, and the politics of care are also discussed in Part II. The concluding discussion covers disease and health care in South Africa and the constitution of the World Health Organization.
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