Your search found 220 Results

  1. 1
    374326

    10 essentials for prevention of violence against women.

    United Nations. UN Women

    2016 Nov; New York, New York, UN Women, 2016 Nov. 2 p.

    Violence against women and girls is one of the most universal and pervasive human rights violations in the world, of pandemic proportions, with country data showing that about one third of women in the world report experiencing physical or sexual violence at some point in their lifetime, mainly by their partners. UN Women provides knowledge-based policy and programming guidance to a diverse array of stakeholders at international, regional and country levels often partnering with other UN agencies and stakeholders. UN Women’s work is broadly focused on a comprehensive approach to ending violence against women and girls that addresses legislation and policies, prevention, services for survivors, research and data. The briefs included in this package aim to summarize in a concise and friendly way, for advocates, programmers and policy makers, the essential strategies for addressing violence against women in general, for preventing violence and providing services to survivors in particular.
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  2. 2
    373777
    Peer Reviewed

    HIV/AIDS policy-making in Kyrgyzstan: a stakeholder analysis.

    Ancker S; Rechel B

    Health Policy and Planning. 2015 Feb; 30(1):8-18.

    Kyrgyzstan has adopted a number of policy initiatives to deal with an accelerating HIV/AIDS epidemic. This article explores the main actors in HIV/AIDS policy-making, their interests, support and involvement and their current ability to set the agenda and influence the policy-making process. Fifty-four semi-structured interviews were conducted in the autumn of 2011, complemented by a review of policy documents and secondary sources on HIV/AIDS in Kyrgyzstan. We found that most stakeholders were supportive of progressive HIV/AIDS policies, but that their influence levels varied considerably. Worryingly, several major state agencies exhibited some resistance or lack of initiative towards HIV/AIDS policies, often prompting international agencies and local NGOs to conceptualize and drive appropriate policies. We conclude that, without clear vision and leadership by the state, the sustainability of the national response will be in question.
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  3. 3
    334251

    Report on the online discussion on eliminating violence against women and girls -- gaps, challenges and strategic directions in prevention and multisectoral services and responses.

    Baker J

    [New York, New York], UN Women, [2012]. [32] p. (CSW 57 Online Discussion)

    Between 23 July and 7 August 2012, UN Women ran a dynamic online discussion to support preparations for the forthcoming 57th Commission on the Status of Women which brought together the views of diverse respondents on the good practices and key gaps and challenges in the prevention of and response to violence against women and girls. Participants included representatives from civil society, government organizations, research and leadership institutions and UN agencies in many countries from all regions of the world. The discussions will be taken into consideration in the development of the Secretary-General’s Reports to the Commission on the Status of Women.
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  4. 4
    328215

    Repositioning family planning: Guidelines for advocacy action. Le repositionnement de la planification familiale: Directives pour actions de plaidoyer.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for Africa; Population Reference Bureau [PRB]. Bringing Information to Decisionmakers for Global Effectiveness [BRIDGE]; Academy for Educational Development [AED]. Africa's Health in 2010

    Washington, D.C., Academy for Educational Development [AED], 2008. 64 p.

    Countries throughout Africa are engaged in an important initiative to reposition family planning as a priority on their national and local agendas. Provision of family planning services in Africa is hindered by poverty, poor access to services and commodities, conflicts, poor coordination of the programmes, and dwindling donor funding. Although family planning enhances efforts to improve health and accelerate development, shifting international priorities, health sector reform, the HIV/AIDS crisis, and other factors have affected its importance in recent years. Traditional beliefs favouring high fertility, religious barriers, and lack of male involvement have weakened family planning interventions. The combination of these factors has led to low contraceptive use, high fertility rates in many countries, and high unmet needs for family planning throughout the region. Family planning advocates must take action to change this situation. Family planning, considered an essential component of primary health care and reproductive health, plays a major role in reducing maternal and newborn morbidity and mortality and transmission of HIV. It contributes to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals and the targets of the Health-for-All Policy for the 21st century in the Africa Region: Agenda 2020. In recognition of its importance, the World Health Organisation Regional Office for Africa developed a framework (2005-014) for accelerated action to reposition family planning on national agendas and in reproductive health services, which was adopted by African ministers of health in 2004. The framework calls for increase in efforts to advocate for recognition of "the pivotal role of family planning" in achieving health and development objectives at all levels. This toolkit aims to help those working in family planning across Africa to effectively advocate for renewed emphasis on family planning to enhance the visibility, availability, and quality of family planning services for increased contraceptive use and healthy timing and spacing of births, and ultimately, improved quality of life across the region. It was developed in response to requests from several countries to assist them in accelerating their family planning advocacy efforts.
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  5. 5
    329205

    Continuum of care for HIV patients returning to Mexico [letter]

    Donohoe T; Reyes M; Armas L; Mandel N

    Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. 2008 Sep-Oct; 19(5):335-7.

    The U.S.-Mexico Border region, which includes some of the poorest counties in the country, has large rural populations with health care service shortages leading to poorer health outcomes than in the rest of the country (United States-Mexico Border Health Commission, 2008). In combination with these factors, an increase in the number of HIV cases along the border led to a request from the Health Resources and Services Administration for a collaborative effort to systematically assess the education and capacity building needs of health care providers in this region. The three AETCs geographically located along the border (Pacific AETC [California, Arizona], Mountain- Plains AETC [New Mexico], and Texas/Oklahoma AETC [Texas]) interviewed more than 75 border clinicians to determine their unique HIV-related education needs. Four broad training-related needs emerged: (a) to increase integration and coordination of HIV training activities, (b) to expand HIV training beyond AETC-targeted providers, (c) to offer site-based trainings that include cultural sensitivity themes and incentives for participation, and (d) to maintain a binational perspective by including Mexican clinicians in training activities. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    327409
    Peer Reviewed

    Linking Global Youth Tobacco Survey 2003 and 2006 data to tobacco control policy in India.

    Sinha DN; Gupta PC; Reddy KS; Prasad VM; Rahman K

    Journal of School Health. 2008 Jul; 78(7):368-373.

    India made 2 important policy statements regarding tobacco control in the past decade. First, the India Tobacco Control Act (ITCA) was signed into law in 2003 with the goal to reduce tobacco consumption and protect citizens from exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS). Second, in 2005, India ratified the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC). During this same period, India conducted the Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS) in 2003 and 2006 in an effort to track tobacco use among adolescents. The GYTS is a school-based survey of students aged 13-15 years. Representative national estimates for India in 2003 and 2006 were used in this study. In 2006, 3.8% of students currently smoked cigarettes and 11.9% currently used other tobacco products. These rates were not significantly different than those observed in 2003. Over the same period, exposure to SHS at home and in public places significantly decreased, whereas exposure to pro-tobacco ads on billboards and the ability to purchase cigarettes in a store did not change significantly. The ITCA and the WHO FCTC have had mixed impacts on the tobacco control effort for adolescents in India. The positive impacts have been the reduction in exposure to SHS, both at home and in public places. The negative impacts are seen with the lack of change in pro-tobacco advertising and ability to purchase cigarettes in stores. The Government of India needs to consider new and stronger provisions of the ITCA and include strong enforcement measures. (author's)
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  7. 7
    327213

    Tobacco use among students aged 13 - 15 years - Sri Lanka, 1999 - 2007.

    United States. Center for Disease Control [CDC]

    MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 2008 May 23; 57(20):545-549.

    Tobacco use is one of the major preventable causes of premature death and disease in the world. The World Health Organization (WHO) attributes approximately 5 million deaths per year to tobacco use, a number expected to exceed 8 million per year by 2030. In 1999, the Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS) was initiated by WHO, CDC, and the Canadian Public Health Association to monitor tobacco use, attitudes about tobacco use, and exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) among students aged 13-15 years. Since 1999, the survey has been completed by approximately 2 million students in 151 countries. A key goal of GYTS is for countries to repeat the survey every 4 years. This report summarizes results from GYTS conducted in Sri Lanka in 1999, 2003, and 2007. The findings indicated that during 1999-2007, the percentage of students aged 13-15 years who reported current cigarette smoking decreased, from 4.0% in 1999 to 1.2% in 2007. During this period, the percentage of never smokers in this age group likely to initiate smoking also decreased, from 5.1% in 1999 to 3.7% in 2007. Future declines in tobacco use in Sri Lanka will be enhanced through development and implementation of new tobacco-control measures and strengthening of existing measures that encourage smokers to quit, eliminate exposure to SHS, and encourage persons not to initiate tobacco use. (excerpt)
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  8. 8
    326774

    From family planning to HIV / AIDS in Vietnam: Shifting priorities, remaining gaps.

    Le Minh Giang; Nguyen Thi Mai Huong

    In: SexPolitics: Reports from the front lines, edited by Richard Parker, Rosalind Petchesky and Robert Sember. [Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Associacao Brasileira Interdisciplinar de AIDS (ABIA), Sexuality Policy Watch, 2008]. 277-309.

    Globally, both the disjunction between sexual and reproductive health and HIV/AIDS, and the fact that HIV/AIDS has taken over the political and funding agenda, are well noted. A recent editorial in the journal, Reproductive Health Matters, summed up this trend, noting that although HIV/AIDS has been with us for more than two decades, "now, suddenly, following rapid shifts in political leadership, priority setting, power brokering, and funding policies in international health and development circles, it is widely considered an unassailable fact that in the global 'competition' for resources and attention, sexual and reproductive health has less priority and has lost out to AIDS, as if addressing the one had no connection with addressing the other". Has this trend been realized in Vietnam? If so, what are some of the factors that have shaped this trend and which of its characteristics should Vietnam take into account moving forward? (excerpt)
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  9. 9
    326035

    Identification of the obstacles to the signing and ratification of the UN Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers: the Asia-Pacific Perspective.

    Piper N; Iredale R

    [Paris, France], UNESCO, International Migration and Multicultural Policies Section, 2003 Oct. 68 p. (UNESCO Series of Country Reports on the Ratification of the UN Convention on Migrants; SHS/2003/MC/1 REV)

    The overall aim of this report is to investigate ways to gain wider acceptance of the ICMR in the specific context of the Asia Pacific region. This report: investigates why a sample of major sending and receiving countries in the Asia Pacific region have not ratified the Convention, and develops recommendations to encourage more ratifications in this region and beyond. The main research methods employed were semi-structured interviews with key informants in seven selected countries in the Asia Pacific region. Informants were sought from among the following groups: politicians and/or governmental officials (at national and local level), NGO representatives (migrant support groups and human rights groups), academics, embassy staff (labour attaches), lawyers (bar associations), trade unions and employers/industry organizations, and National Human Rights Commissions (see Appendix I for more details). Interviews were arranged with the assistance of local coordinators, most of whom are members of the APMRN. The actual interview schedule was designed to test the obstacles and opportunities created by ratifying the Convention from a legal, social and political perspective. This also included an examination of the role the media are playing in the acceptance of human rights for migrants. Other materials informing the report comes from websites, and from newspaper clippings and copies of legal and semi-legal documents provided by the country coordinators. (excerpt)
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  10. 10
    319709

    HIV / AIDS prevention among youth: What works?

    Zewdie D; Vollmer G; McGinnis L; de Beyer J

    Youth Development Notes. 2006 Nov; 2(1):1-4.

    Young people are at the heart of the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Not only are they disproportionately represented in terms of new infections, but they are also key to overcoming the disease. Effective HIV prevention efforts that focus on youth are crucial to reversing the pandemic. The World Bank is one of the largest official financiers of HIV/AIDS programs in the world, with over $2.7 billion committed for HIV/AIDS prevention, care, support and treatment since 1988. A recent review of Bank projects related to HIV/AIDS (1999-2004) reveals that over 40% include specific youth components, and virtually all include youth as a target group. This note summarizes the growing body of evidence of what works to prevent HIV/AIDS among youth in developing countries. (excerpt)
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  11. 11
    312495

    Guide to the implementation of the World Programme of Action for Youth. Recommendations and ideas for concrete action for policies and programmes that address the everyday realities and challenges of youth.

    Krasnor E

    New York, New York, United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, 2006. [135] p. (ST/ESA/309)

    The following key policy messages form the foundation of the recommendations contained in this Guide: Recognize, address and respond to youth as a distinct but heterogeneous population group, with particular needs and capacities which stem from their formative age; Build the capabilities and expand the choices of young people by enhancing their access to and participation in all dimensions of society; Catalyze investment in youth so that they consistently have the proper resources, information and opportunities to realize their full potential; Change the public support available to youth from ad-hoc or last-minute to consistent and mainstreamed; Promote partnerships, cooperation and the strengthening of institutional capacity that contribute to more solid investments in youth; Support the goal of promoting youth themselves as valuable assets and effective partners; Include young people and their representative associations at all stages of the policy development and implementation process; and Transform the public perception of young people from neglect to priority, from a problem to a resource, and from suspicion to trust. (excerpt)
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  12. 12
    310080

    Ford Foundation and Elton John AIDS Foundation join Caribbean broadcasters and the Kaiser Family Foundation to advance the Caribbean Broadcast Media Partnership on HIV / AIDS, as part of a global mobilization of media. Partnership includes regional PSA campaign, HIV-themed programming, and other informational resources.

    Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation

    Toronto, Canada, Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 2006 Aug 16. 2 p.

    Today, the Ford Foundation and Elton John AIDS Foundation announced they would be joining the Kaiser Family Foundation in together providing one million USD to support the operations of the Caribbean Broadcast Media Partnership on HIV/AIDS, the region's first media-led initiative on HIV/AIDS. Kaiser, which helped initiate and create the Partnership, will also provide ongoing operational and public health expertise. The Partnership -- which responds to U.N. Secretary General Kofi Annan's call-to-action to media under the Global Media AIDS Initiative (GMAI) -- promotes collaboration and leverages resources among media in the region with the goal of expanding AIDS programming. The Caribbean region has the highest HIV/AIDS prevalence rate in the world outside sub-Saharan Africa. According to the latest UNAIDS statistics, AIDS is now the leading cause of death among adults in the region ages 15-44 years. Stigma and homophobia have been identified as major contributors to the spread of HIV/AIDS in the region. (excerpt)
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  13. 13
    309717

    Focusing on gender: an assessment of gender integration in UNFPA materials.

    Pozdorovkina E; El-Solh CF; Mellon C; Leidl P

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], [2006]. 70 p.

    Achieving gender equality and equity through the empowerment of women is a crucial strategic goal of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA). As population and development thinking has evolved to include a sound understanding of gender, so, too, have the UNFPA mandate, policies, programmes and organizational structure. Numerous publications and training materials produced by UNFPA organizational units have aimed at facilitating an understanding of gender-related concepts. Yet, the subject of gender remains challenging for UNFPA staff. Many reviews and evaluations mention the need for more clarity and practical guidance on gender mainstreaming (see glossary) in programming. This assessment set out to help meet that need. Its objectives were as follows: To assess the quality, packaging and design of gender-related messages being communicated to UNFPA staff; To assess the utility and utilization of these materials by interviewing stakeholders in UNFPA headquarters and the field; To identify good practices to improve the communication of gender concepts and their mainstreaming into all UNFPA materials; and To promote a common understanding of what should be done at the organizational level to institutionalize strengths and achievements in current practice. (excerpt)
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  14. 14
    309241

    Getting the message across: the mass media and the response to AIDS.

    Armstrong S

    Geneva, Switzerland, Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS], 2005 Dec. 56 p. (UNAIDS Best Practice Collection; UNAIDS/05.29E)

    For this report, a UNAIDS consultant visited South Africa to interview a wide range of people working on the frontline, from project managers, researchers and media executives, to film-makers, audience groups, and people living with HIV who present their own programmes. The aim was to find out not just what has to be done in practical terms, but to gain some insight into the thrills and frustrations of working in the tough environment of the mass media, and to discover the secrets of survival and success. The organizations have very different histories, target audiences and ways of working, and represent a wide range of experience. (excerpt)
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  15. 15
    300912

    Personal commitment, concrete actions. Leadership in action.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]

    Kyiv, Ukraine, UNDP, [2004]. 15 p.

    Ukraine is at a critical point in its response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The country has the highest rate of HIV infection prevalence in Europe and the CIS, about one per cent of the adult population. At the heart of generating an effective national response on HIV/AIDS are committed, mobilized leaders who are speaking out and taking action in their respective spheres of influence. Analysis of successful responses around the globe has highlighted leadership as a key ingredient for overcoming stigma and effective action in both prevention and care. Leaders for an effective national response must come from all levels of society -- national, regional and local Government; NGOs; media; schools; youth organizations; and the household. In modern, democratic Ukraine, citizens enjoy unprecedented freedoms and choices. Each leads his or her own life in a very personal way. Faced with the present onslaught of HIV/AIDS such individuals need basic information and support for their safe behaviour choices to avoid infection, for their compassion for those living with the virus and for their inclusion in the nationwide response. (excerpt)
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  16. 16
    300910

    HIV / AIDS programme strategic framework. Making the possible happen.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]

    [Kyiv], Ukraine, UNDP, [2004]. 11 p.

    HIV/AIDS presents the greatest challenge to human development the world has ever seen. With nearly 42 million people living with HIV/ AIDS, 20 million already dead and 15,000 new infections daily, its devastating scale and impact constitute a global emergency that is undermining social and economic development throughout the world and affecting individuals, families, communities and nations. HIV/AIDS reverses gains in human development and denies people the basic opportunities for living long, healthy, creative and productive lives. It impoverishes people and places burdens on households and communities to care for the sick and dying, while claiming the lives of people in their most productive years. HIV/AIDS also results in social exclusion and violations of human dignity and rights affecting people's psychological well-being. While the long-term consequences may not yet be visible here, Ukraine is glimpsing the enormity of the problem in its newly independent country. The number of reported cases of HIV infection in the country has increased 20 times in the past five years yielding estimates of 300,000 to 400,000 people already infected, which is approximately 1% of the adult population. The Declaration of Commitment of the UN General Assembly Special Session on HIV/AIDS notes "the potential exists for a rapid escalation of the epidemic". The dynamics of the spread of the epidemic can be indicative of the potential magnitude of future human development impacts, deepening over time and affecting future generations. (excerpt)
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  17. 17
    297492

    Evaluation of virtual reality in Africa: an educational perspective.

    Lockwood D

    Paris, France, UNESCO, 2004. [52] p. (CI-2004/WS/1)

    UNESCO has, since 2000, supported a number of initiatives with the Naledi3d Factory that have explored the potential of Virtual Reality (VR) as a learning tool in Africa, to date in Ethiopia, South Africa and Uganda (summarized in the box). In order to define a way forward in this project area, UNESCO commissioned this report, which evaluates the comparative advantages of applying multimedia and interactive 3D tools to the learning environment. This project was divided into two parts: 1. An overview of the general practices and approaches to the use of multimedia and interactive 3D tools as learning aids, and 2. An evaluation programme in South Africa and Uganda covering a number of schools and community telecentres. (excerpt)
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  18. 18
    297212

    Close your eyes to the HIV problem today and tomorrow you'll be living in a country of old people and won't have a partner to play chess with.

    Connections. 2005 Jan; [2] p..

    What is the best way to tackle the HIV/AIDS problem in Russia when the scale of this infection's spread has passed all the bounds? What can be done when the efforts of numerous HIV-service organizations and domestic and international NGOs to implement short-term educational programs and information campaigns are not effective enough to appeal to the common sense of both those who are at risk and those who have the power to stop the virus from spreading further? Do the people of this country have eyes and, if so, what does their future look like when some 80 percent of the estimated 1.5 million HIV-positive Russians are under the age of 30 . . . when only 3,000 out of the 50,000 who are in dire need of treatment have access to it? Will this country still be a strong power if one million young people die from AIDS by 2008, as forecasted by Vadim Pokrovsky, head of the Federal AIDS Center, unless appropriate steps are done by the government to prevent it? (excerpt)
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  19. 19
    296436

    Marginalization of women in the media: what the United Nations should do.

    Gill S

    UN Chronicle. 2003 Dec; 40(4):[4] p..

    The media, as an important agent of socialization in the modern world, either support or contest cultural conceptions, and have a significant impact on the social construction of gender. The media's effects operate at the level of gender belief systems, affecting individual "beliefs and opinions about males and females, and about the purported qualities of masculinity and femininity". The mass media have been found to play a critical role in maintaining the gender-power imbalance, "passing on dominant, patriarchal/sexist values". But such a situation is not inherent in the nature of media. They can instead be agents of development and progress if guided by clear, socially relevant policies. Their hoped-for positive contribution to women's advancement will only take place in the context of a framework that clearly defines policy objectives, maps out actions and decisions which comprise the particular policy, defines the minimum standards to be met by all participants in the process, and provides mechanisms for assessing progress towards policy objectives. (excerpt)
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  20. 20
    296078

    Gender achievements and prospects in education. The GAP report. Part One.

    UNICEF

    New York, New York, UNICEF, 2005 Nov. 100 p.

    On 1 January 2006, the world will wake up to a deadline missed. The Millennium Development Goal - gender parity in primary and secondary education by 2005 - will remain unmet. What is particularly disheartening is that this was a realistic deadline and a reachable goal. The tragedy of this failure is that an unthinkable number of children, the majority of whom are girls, have been abandoned to a bleak future. The road to gender equality in education has had its successes, but the journey with its twists and turns is far from over. The fact that the total number of school-age children who are missing from school is projected to fall below 100 million for the first time since data have been recorded is a small victory. In 81 developing countries, participation in education will rise to 86 per cent in 2005, up from 82 per cent in 2001.2 But these accomplishments are baby steps compared to what could have - and should have - been achieved. (excerpt)
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  21. 21
    295833

    Beijing at ten: UNFPA's commitment to the Platform for Action.

    Axmacher S

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 2005. [52] p.

    At the Fourth World Conference on Women (FWCW) in Beijing, China, September 1995, 189 countries adopted the Declaration and Platform for Action, reflecting a new international commitment to the goals of equality, development and peace for all women everywhere. Five years later, in June 2000, Member States reaffirmed their commitments to the twelve critical areas of concern in the Beijing Platform at the Beijing +5 session of the General Assembly at United Nations Headquarters in New York, and considered future actions and initiatives for the year 2000 and beyond. The United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) is fulfilling the principles and recommendations of Beijing through its ongoing work, mandated by the Programme of Action endorsed by 179 countries at the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) in Cairo in 1994. The Cairo agenda represents an international commitment to principles of reproductive health and rights for women and men, gender equality and male responsibility, and to the autonomy and empowerment of women everywhere. (excerpt)
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  22. 22
    289588

    World Population Conference Rome, August 31 - September 10.

    Notestein FW

    Population Index. 1954 Oct; 20(4):241-248.

    As most demographers know, a World Population Conference was held in Rome from August 31 to September 10 this year under the sponsorship of the United Nations, its interested specialized agencies and the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population. In terms of scope of subject matter, amount of documentation and breadth of geographic distribution in attendance it proved to be much the largest population conference ever held. (excerpt)
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  23. 23
    287506

    Talking points for Bill Gates, UN Media Leaders Summit on HIV / AIDS, January 15, 2004. 8-10 minute remarks.

    Gates B

    [Unpublished] 2004. 4 p.

    The media have played a crucial role in highlighting the most important issues of our time—civil rights, apartheid, political oppression. Yet HIV/AIDS may be the greatest challenge of all. You have played a remarkable role already. In fact, the media had a great influence on my own commitment to fight diseases in the developing world. Early on, when my wife, Melinda, and I were thinking about our philanthropy and how we could have the greatest impact with our resources, my father sent me a clip from a newspaper about preventable deaths in poor countries. I remember reading a chart that listed the world’s deadliest diseases. One disease I had never even heard of— rotavirus—was killing literally half a million kids each year. I thought: That can’t be true, that’s got to be a typo. If a single disease was killing that many kids, we would have heard about it—it’d be front-page news. But it isn’t. As Melinda and I have become more engaged in global health issues over the past decade, one thing has become clear: not enough is being done about the millions of preventable deaths each year from diseases like AIDS or malaria. In part, that’s because people aren’t aware of what is happening. We don’t see these issues covered enough in newspapers, radio and television. (excerpt)
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  24. 24
    287145

    United Nations-supported Global Media AIDS Initiative announces new media efforts to address HIV / AIDS in Russia, India, China, Indonesia and U.S. News release.

    Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Global Media AIDS Initiative

    Bangkok, Thailand, Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 2004 Jul 13. 3 p.

    New HIV-focused public education efforts in Russia, India, China, Indonesia, and the United States were announced today by the United Nations-supported Global Media AIDS Initiative, a collective of media companies from around the globe who have committed resources to the fight against AIDS. New resources are also being developed to enable media companies to broadly share content and expertise based on successful ongoing public education campaigns. Additionally, expanded media efforts to address HIV/AIDS in Indonesia were also included among the round four funding announced by the Global Fund earlier this month. Established at a special meeting held at United Nations headquarters on January 15, 2004 by Secretary General Kofi Annan and directed in partnership by The Joint Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), the United Nations Department of Public Information, and the Kaiser Family Foundation with additional support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Global Media AIDS Initiative seeks to engage media companies to combat HIV/AIDS. More than twenty leading media executives from around the world have joined the Initiative and committed their companies to expanding public knowledge and understanding about HIV/AIDS. (excerpt)
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  25. 25
    274789

    Overcoming AIDS stigma and media fatigue.

    Spadacini BM

    Global AIDSLink. 2003 Apr-May; (79):12-13.

    The media plays a unique role within society either to denounce or to perpetuate the bias and moral judgments against people with HIV/AIDS. Sometimes journalists can underestimate how influential their portrayal of HIV/AIDS is in shaping people's attitudes, especially when society fails to distinguish between people and the disease they suffer from; when denial is so pervasive that the infected are ostracized by their families. In addition, reporters, editors and producers constantly grapple with ways to find fresh angles to discuss HIV, and ensure their viewers and readers remain engaged by a topic that never appears to grow old. To address these and other key topics concerning the media and its treatment of HIV/AIDS, the World Bank organized a distance-learning course from June to November 2002 that simultaneously brought together journalists and HIV/AIDS project managers from Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, Nigeria and Malawi. The course, entitled Fighting the HIV/AIDS Pandemic through Information and Strategic Communication, recognizes the role that successful communication campaigns can play in increasing understanding of the disease and promoting life-saving behaviors. Each program stream consisted of eight video-conferenced modules, which were followed up through in-country work. (excerpt)
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