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  1. 1
    372636

    Atlas of Sustainable Development Goals 2018: From World Development Indicators.

    World Bank

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 2018. 91 p.

    he Atlas of Sustainable Development Goals 2018 is a visual guide to the trends, challenges and measurement issues related to each of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. The Atlas features maps and data visualizations, primarily drawn from World Development Indicators (WDI) - the World Bank’s compilation of internationally comparable statistics about global development and the quality of people’s lives. Given the breadth and scope of the SDGs, the editors have been selective, emphasizing issues considered important by experts in the World Bank’s Global Practices and Cross Cutting Solution Areas. Nevertheless, The Atlas aims to reflect the breadth of the Goals themselves and presents national and regional trends and snapshots of progress towards the UN’s seventeen Sustainable Development Goals related to: poverty, hunger, health, education, gender, water, energy, jobs, infrastructure, inequalities, cities, consumption, climate, oceans, the environment, peace, institutions, and partnerships.
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  2. 2
    375130

    Atlas of Sustainable Development Goals 2017. From World Development Indicators.

    World Bank

    Washington, D.C., International Bank for Reconstruction and Development / The World Bank, 2017. 131 p.

    The Atlas of Sustainable Development Goals 2017 uses maps, charts and analysis to illustrate, trends, challenges and measurement issues related to each of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. The Atlas primarily draws on World Development Indicators (WDI) - the World Bank's compilation of internationally comparable statistics about global development and the quality of people's lives Given the breadth and scope of the SDGs, the editors have been selective, emphasizing issues considered important by experts in the World Bank's Global Practices and Cross Cutting Solution Areas. Nevertheless, The Atlas aims to reflect the breadth of the Goals themselves and presents national and regional trends and snapshots of progress towards the UN's seventeen Sustainable Development Goals: poverty, hunger, health, education, gender, water, energy, jobs, infrastructure, inequalities, cities, consumption, climate, oceans, the environment, peace, institutions, and partnerships. Between 1990 and 2013, nearly one billion people were raised out of extreme poverty. Its elimination is now a realistic prospect, although this will require both sustained growth and reduced inequality. Even then, gender inequalities continue to hold back human potential. Undernourishment and stunting have nearly halved since 1990, despite increasing food loss, while the burden of infectious disease has also declined. Access to water has expanded, but progress on sanitation has been slower. For too many people, access to healthcare and education still depends on personal financial means. To date the environmental cost of growth has been high. Accumulated damage to oceanic and terrestrial ecosystems is considerable. But hopeful signs exist: while greenhouse gas emissions are at record levels, so too is renewable energy investment. While physical infrastructure continues to expand, so too does population, so that urban housing and rural access to roads remain a challenge, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa. Meanwhile the institutional infrastructure of development strengthens, with more reliable government budgeting and foreign direct investment recovering from a post-financial crisis decline. Official development assistance, however, continues to fall short of target levels.
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  3. 3
    334265

    Atlas of African health statistics, 2012. Health situation analysis of the African region.

    African Health Observatory; World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for Africa

    Brazzaville, Republic of Congo, WHO, Regional Office for Africa, 2012. [105] p.

    With over 730 million inhabitants in 46 countries, the African Region accounts for about one seventh of the world’s population. This statistical atlas provides the health status and trends in the countries of the African Region, the various components of their health systems, coverage and access levels for specific programmes and services, and the broader determinants of health in the Region, and the progress made on reaching the Millennium Development Goals. Each indicator is described, as appropriate, in terms of place (WHO regions and countries in the African Region), person (age and sex) and time (various years) using a bar graph. The aim is to give a comprehensive overview of the health situation in the African Region and its 46 Member States. The main source for the data is WHO-AFRO’s integrated database, based on the World Health Statistics 2012. Other UN agency databases have been used when necessary. All the data and figures in this atlas can be accessed through the African Health Observatory..
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  4. 4
    075934

    Global population assistance report, 1982-1990.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 1992 Apr 1. v, 102 p.

    The global population assistance report for the UN Population Fund (UNFPA), 1982-90, provides background on development activities, the levels and trends in international assistance, current commitments, expenditures, types of programs funded, and future resource requirements. Numerous tables, maps, and figures in the appendix provide information on commitments and expenditures by country and region historically. The report highlights the following: 1) a record high for grants totaling US$801.8 million, 2) an increase of 12% from 1989 to 1990 in commitments, 3) the US, Japan, Norway, Germany, Canada, Sweden, the United Kingdom, Netherlands, Finland, and Denmark as donors comprising 96% of commitments all increasing contributions, 4) the World Bank increasing its loan agreement from US$125 to US$169 million between 1989-90, 5) donors commiting aid in roughly equal proportions: 30% to bilateral aid, 34% to UN agencies, and 35% to nongovernmental organizations, 6) the donor contributions of population assistance as a % of Official Development Assistance dropping from 1.21% to 1.18% between 1989-90, 7) and US$9 billion/year being required in order to meet the medium projection target in 2000. Expenditure increased in Africa from US$128 to US$153 from 1989 to 1990. Stable expenditures amounted to US$208 million in Asia and the Pacific, US$92 million in Latin America and the Caribbean, and US$52 million in the Middle East and north Africa. The use of multiple channels of support means the distribution of assistance is adapted to local conditions. 66% of all exenditures go toward family planning services, 15% for information, education, and communication, and 5% for basic data collection.
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  5. 5
    077120

    The World Bank atlas 1989. 22nd edition.

    World Bank

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 1989. 29 p.

    This 22nd edition of the Atlas presents current economic and social indicators that describe trends, indicate orders of magnitude, and characterize significant differences among countries. This year illiteracy rates, share of agriculture in gross domestic product, and daily calorie supply per capita are presented in the main table, and illiteracy rates rather than school enrollment ratios are charted. The Atlas reveals that real per capita income has risen during the 1980s for the majority of countries. However, more than 10% of the world's population lives in countries where the real gross national product per capita is not growing; more than half live in countries where the average gross national product per capita is still under $500. Relative income levels are also affected by fluctuations in exchange rates and terms of trade, which have been sharp during the decade. Hence the levels and ranking of gross national product per capita estimates have changed in ways not necessarily related to economic performance. The social indicators provide evidence of improved standards of living since the early 1970s. Recent trends are difficult to discern because conditions change gradually and data on these conditions are less current and less frequently gathered.
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