Your search found 14 Results

  1. 1
    372636

    Atlas of Sustainable Development Goals 2018: From World Development Indicators.

    World Bank

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 2018. 91 p.

    he Atlas of Sustainable Development Goals 2018 is a visual guide to the trends, challenges and measurement issues related to each of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. The Atlas features maps and data visualizations, primarily drawn from World Development Indicators (WDI) - the World Bank’s compilation of internationally comparable statistics about global development and the quality of people’s lives. Given the breadth and scope of the SDGs, the editors have been selective, emphasizing issues considered important by experts in the World Bank’s Global Practices and Cross Cutting Solution Areas. Nevertheless, The Atlas aims to reflect the breadth of the Goals themselves and presents national and regional trends and snapshots of progress towards the UN’s seventeen Sustainable Development Goals related to: poverty, hunger, health, education, gender, water, energy, jobs, infrastructure, inequalities, cities, consumption, climate, oceans, the environment, peace, institutions, and partnerships.
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  2. 2
    375130

    Atlas of Sustainable Development Goals 2017. From World Development Indicators.

    World Bank

    Washington, D.C., International Bank for Reconstruction and Development / The World Bank, 2017. 131 p.

    The Atlas of Sustainable Development Goals 2017 uses maps, charts and analysis to illustrate, trends, challenges and measurement issues related to each of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. The Atlas primarily draws on World Development Indicators (WDI) - the World Bank's compilation of internationally comparable statistics about global development and the quality of people's lives Given the breadth and scope of the SDGs, the editors have been selective, emphasizing issues considered important by experts in the World Bank's Global Practices and Cross Cutting Solution Areas. Nevertheless, The Atlas aims to reflect the breadth of the Goals themselves and presents national and regional trends and snapshots of progress towards the UN's seventeen Sustainable Development Goals: poverty, hunger, health, education, gender, water, energy, jobs, infrastructure, inequalities, cities, consumption, climate, oceans, the environment, peace, institutions, and partnerships. Between 1990 and 2013, nearly one billion people were raised out of extreme poverty. Its elimination is now a realistic prospect, although this will require both sustained growth and reduced inequality. Even then, gender inequalities continue to hold back human potential. Undernourishment and stunting have nearly halved since 1990, despite increasing food loss, while the burden of infectious disease has also declined. Access to water has expanded, but progress on sanitation has been slower. For too many people, access to healthcare and education still depends on personal financial means. To date the environmental cost of growth has been high. Accumulated damage to oceanic and terrestrial ecosystems is considerable. But hopeful signs exist: while greenhouse gas emissions are at record levels, so too is renewable energy investment. While physical infrastructure continues to expand, so too does population, so that urban housing and rural access to roads remain a challenge, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa. Meanwhile the institutional infrastructure of development strengthens, with more reliable government budgeting and foreign direct investment recovering from a post-financial crisis decline. Official development assistance, however, continues to fall short of target levels.
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  3. 3
    334265

    Atlas of African health statistics, 2012. Health situation analysis of the African region.

    African Health Observatory; World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for Africa

    Brazzaville, Republic of Congo, WHO, Regional Office for Africa, 2012. [105] p.

    With over 730 million inhabitants in 46 countries, the African Region accounts for about one seventh of the world’s population. This statistical atlas provides the health status and trends in the countries of the African Region, the various components of their health systems, coverage and access levels for specific programmes and services, and the broader determinants of health in the Region, and the progress made on reaching the Millennium Development Goals. Each indicator is described, as appropriate, in terms of place (WHO regions and countries in the African Region), person (age and sex) and time (various years) using a bar graph. The aim is to give a comprehensive overview of the health situation in the African Region and its 46 Member States. The main source for the data is WHO-AFRO’s integrated database, based on the World Health Statistics 2012. Other UN agency databases have been used when necessary. All the data and figures in this atlas can be accessed through the African Health Observatory..
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  4. 4
    165358

    A global view of HIV infections.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    [Geneva, Switzerland], UNAIDS, 2001. [2] p.

    This wall chart depicts a global view of HIV infections. Its three maps illuminate the magnitude, impact, and recent trends of HIV spread in regions, countries and societies. The first map displays the HIV infection prevalence rate among adults at the end of 1999. This measures the impact of the epidemic in a country, regardless of the size of its population. The second map shows the estimated number of people living with HIV/AIDS at the end of 1999. This map allows for a better understanding of the magnitude of resource needs for the care and support of those infected and affected with the epidemic. Finally, map three gives the proportional change in estimated adult HIV prevalence between 1994 and 1999, reflecting recent dynamics of the HIV epidemics.
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  5. 5
    100933

    The current global situation of the HIV / AIDS pandemic. La situation actuelle de la pandemie de VIH / SIDA dans le monde.

    WEEKLY EPIDEMIOLOGICAL RECORD. 1994 Jul 1; 69(26):191-2.

    Between mid-1993 and mid-1994, the number of AIDS cases reported to WHO increased 37%. The cumulative number of reported global AIDS cases is 985,119 (as of mid-1994). Of all reported AIDS cases, 42% are in the US, 33.5% in Africa, 11.5% in the Americas (excluding the US), 11.5% in Europe, 1% in Asia, and 0.5% in Oceania. Based on available data on global HIV infections, WHO considered incomplete reporting, underdiagnosis, and reporting delay to estimate the number of AIDS cases to be about 4 million and the global distribution of AIDS cases to be greater than 67% in the US, 12% in the Americas, 10% in the US, 6% in Asia, more than 4% in Europe, and less than 1% in Oceania. This adjusted number is a 60% increase over the estimated 2.5 million cases as of July 1993. The rise in AIDS cases in Asia reflects the rapid spread of the AIDS epidemic there. More than an estimated 16 million adults and 1 million children have been infected with HIV since the beginning of the HIV/AIDS pandemic (as of July 1994). Most of the HIV infected adults have been in sub-Saharan Africa (>10 million). South and Southeast Asia had the next highest number of all adults ever infected with HIV (2.5 million) followed by Latin America and the Caribbean (2 million) and North America (>1 million). Australia has the lowest number of cumulative adult HIV infected cases (>25,000). An estimated 80-90% of all children ever infected with HIV have lived in sub-Saharan Africa. The number of HIV infected adults and adult AIDS cases alive as of mid-1994 in sub-Saharan Africa was 8 million. The number for South and Southeast Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, and North America was 2.5 million, 1.5 million, and more than 800,000, respectively. The number of HIV infected persons alive as of mid 1994 in developed countries was not much different than that of mid 1993, suggesting that the number of AIDS deaths was about the same as the number of new HIV infections.
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  6. 6
    075934

    Global population assistance report, 1982-1990.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 1992 Apr 1. v, 102 p.

    The global population assistance report for the UN Population Fund (UNFPA), 1982-90, provides background on development activities, the levels and trends in international assistance, current commitments, expenditures, types of programs funded, and future resource requirements. Numerous tables, maps, and figures in the appendix provide information on commitments and expenditures by country and region historically. The report highlights the following: 1) a record high for grants totaling US$801.8 million, 2) an increase of 12% from 1989 to 1990 in commitments, 3) the US, Japan, Norway, Germany, Canada, Sweden, the United Kingdom, Netherlands, Finland, and Denmark as donors comprising 96% of commitments all increasing contributions, 4) the World Bank increasing its loan agreement from US$125 to US$169 million between 1989-90, 5) donors commiting aid in roughly equal proportions: 30% to bilateral aid, 34% to UN agencies, and 35% to nongovernmental organizations, 6) the donor contributions of population assistance as a % of Official Development Assistance dropping from 1.21% to 1.18% between 1989-90, 7) and US$9 billion/year being required in order to meet the medium projection target in 2000. Expenditure increased in Africa from US$128 to US$153 from 1989 to 1990. Stable expenditures amounted to US$208 million in Asia and the Pacific, US$92 million in Latin America and the Caribbean, and US$52 million in the Middle East and north Africa. The use of multiple channels of support means the distribution of assistance is adapted to local conditions. 66% of all exenditures go toward family planning services, 15% for information, education, and communication, and 5% for basic data collection.
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  7. 7
    072268

    Contributions of the IGU and ICA commissions in population studies.

    Nag P

    POPULATION GEOGRAPHY. 1989 Jun-Dec; 11(1-2):86-96.

    This paper surveys the contributions of the International Geographic Union (IGU) and the International Cartographic Association (ICA) to the field of population studies over the past 3 decades. Reviewing the various focal themes of conferences sponsored by the organizations since the 1960s, the author examines the evolution of population studies in IGU and ICA. During the 1960s, IGU began holding symposia addressing the issue of population pressure on the physical and social resource in developing countries. However, it wasn't until 1972, at a meeting in Edmonton, Canada, when IGU first addressed the issue of migration. But since then, migration has remained on the the key concerns of IGU. In 1978, the union hosted a symposium on Population Redistribution in Africa -- the first in a series of conferences focusing on the issue of migration. As an outgrowth of migration, the IGU also began addressing the related issue of population education. The interest in migration has continued through the 1980s. In addition to studies of regional migration, the IGU has also focused on conceptual issues such as migrant labor, environmental concerns, women and migration, and urbanization. In 1984, IGU began cooperating with ICA in the areas of census cartography and population cartography. The author concludes his review of IGU and ICA activities by discussing the emerging trends in population studies. The author foresees a more refined study of migration and more sophisticated population mapping, the result of better study techniques and the use of computer technology.
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  8. 8
    069810

    [Populations on the planet] Populations sur la planete.

    Levy ML

    Population et Societes. 1991 Dec; (263):1-3.

    This work contrasts 2 world population atlases published in 1991, 1 the work of a demographer and the other of a geographer. Both works synthesize the concepts of demography as it is currently practiced. The work by the geography, Daniel Noin, (Atlas of World Population) has a more detailed bibliography and glossary and concentrates on the contemporary population situation. The other work (The Population of the World. From Antiquity to 2050), by Jean-Claude Chesnais, takes a historic approach. The 2 works are complementary and neither raises ecological alarms. They stress different issues in their conclusions, Chesnais asking whether the nations of Europe can compensate for their loss of demographic and economic power by regrouping into an entity large enough to maintain influence, Noin identifying fertility decline in the poor countries as the major current demographic challenge. Both authors use the same analytical instrument and rely on UN statistics. The UN, since its origin, has been the site of a confrontation between 2 schools of demographic thought, the American which is preoccupied with rapid population growth in the poor countries, and the French, which stresses fertility decline and demographic aging in the developed countries. The analytical instrument in both cases is the theory of demographic transition, on which both authors have already written. The 2 authors classify the countries differently, 1 identifying 5 stages of transition and the other 3 stages and 8 types of countries. Agreement on the basic phenomenon of the transition is accompanied by some difference of interpretation.
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  9. 9
    077120

    The World Bank atlas 1989. 22nd edition.

    World Bank

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 1989. 29 p.

    This 22nd edition of the Atlas presents current economic and social indicators that describe trends, indicate orders of magnitude, and characterize significant differences among countries. This year illiteracy rates, share of agriculture in gross domestic product, and daily calorie supply per capita are presented in the main table, and illiteracy rates rather than school enrollment ratios are charted. The Atlas reveals that real per capita income has risen during the 1980s for the majority of countries. However, more than 10% of the world's population lives in countries where the real gross national product per capita is not growing; more than half live in countries where the average gross national product per capita is still under $500. Relative income levels are also affected by fluctuations in exchange rates and terms of trade, which have been sharp during the decade. Hence the levels and ranking of gross national product per capita estimates have changed in ways not necessarily related to economic performance. The social indicators provide evidence of improved standards of living since the early 1970s. Recent trends are difficult to discern because conditions change gradually and data on these conditions are less current and less frequently gathered.
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  10. 10
    059994

    Report on organization and conduct of [Sub-Regional] Training Workshop on Census Cartography for English-Speaking Southern and Eastern African Countries. Nairobi, Kenya, 8-19 May, 1989.

    United Nations. Economic Commission for Africa

    [Unpublished] 1989. 9, [9] p. (ECA.STAT/CSAS.1/89/13; RAF/87/P03)

    A recent workshop was organized for the English-speaking countries of Southern and Eastern Africa to use remote sensing materials for census mapping. This included lectures on interpretation of aerial photographs and satellite imagery and its applications to census mapping. The participants were senior statisticians or cartographers in management positions in their countries. the subjects included fundamentals of map interpretation, a laboratory of topographic map reading and scale conversions, census cartography with the definition of census, roles of maps in the census, and planning a census mapping program. The pre- enumeration of cartographic programs and cartographic field work were also covered. The automation of census cartography with the use of micro-computers in the preparation of thematic maps and charts, the delineation and mapping of enumeration and supervision areas, and post- enumeration census mapping activities. This was followed by publication maps, satellite imagery and its uses in census mapping. A field demonstration was then conducted on satellite imagery interpretation and delineation. At the conclusion of the workshop and evaluation was done by questionnaire. The results indicated a need by the participants for more technical documentation on various aspects of computer mapping, especially on equipment, software, and material support. Computer mapping and the publication maps were considered by some as the most important part, and therefore would need additional technical expertise for implementation in their countries.
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  11. 11
    054750

    The geography of fertility in the ESCAP region.

    United Nations. Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific [ESCAP]

    Bangkok, Thailand, United Nations. Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific [ESCAP], 1988 Aug. iii, 41, [31] p. (Asian Population Studies Series No. 62-K)

    The goal of this Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) project was to help family planning administrators and other development planners to pinpoint areas of high and low fertility through reference to a series of maps. Maps have the advantage of being able to summarize an enormous number of items of information in an easily comprehendable manner, including not only the levels and trends of fertility of each area, but also the contrasts between areas and groups of areas at 1 time and over time. The project began when data from the 1980 censuses became available and focused on 10 countries: Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippines, Republic of Korea, Sri Lanka, and Thailand. The maps show in detail, in some cases at the level of very small administrative areas, levels and trends of fertility during the 1970s and where possible the 1960s. The 10 countries participating in this study had to develop new methodological techniques to estimate the fertility of small areas from census data. In most cases, fertility was estimated from the age-sex distribution and children ever born classified by age of mother. Central to the analysis was the concept of reverse survival, which assumes that the number of births can be estimated from the census counts of children and an estimate of the number of children who would have been enumerated in the census if they had not died. The major lesson of this study was that maps of fertility can be drawn with sufficient accuracy to show patterns that cannot be identified easily through any other approach.
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  12. 12
    205220

    The World Bank atlas, 1986.

    World Bank

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 1986. 28 p.

    This atlas presents data on population, gross national product (GNP), and GNP per capita for 1983 in current US dollars for 184 countries and territories. In addition, preliminary estimates for each of these indicators for 1984, annual growth rates for 1973-1983, data on life expectancy, infant mortality, and primary school enrollment are also included. Using color-coded maps of the world to designate different levels for various factors, the maps are easy to read. A comprehensive chart lists all statistics included in the maps. Population growth in the developing countries peaked at 2.4% a year in 1965; this rate has since fallen to about 2.1%, with much of the decline occurring in China. Of the 1.5 billion people that will be added before the end of the century, more than 1/2 will be in countries with a GNP per capita of $400 or less. About 1/6 of the world's people live in countries with a GNP per capita of more than $5500. About 1/10 of the world population live in countries where the average life expectancy at birth is less than 50 years. Life expectancy is closely related to a country's average income. The proportion of infants who die in their 1st year has dropped by 1/2 since 1960, and primary school enrollments in developing countries are twice what they were in 1960--almost 500 million, up from about 240 million.
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  13. 13
    200602

    Features of the 1982 China census from international standpoint.

    Kannisto V

    In: A census of one billion people. Papers for International Seminar on China's 1982 Population Census, edited by Li Chengrui. Boulder, Colorado, Westview Press, 1986. 37-52.

    This paper examines how the 1982 China census met the standards prevalent in the world at large and formulated by the international community into recommendations under UN guidance. It also examines to what extent the China census met the recommendations, what alternatives were adopted and why, and what methods it used to carry them out. China's 1982 census met the criteria of individual enumeration, universality, simultaneity, and defined periodicity. The 1982 census was a register-based de jure census in which the field interview and its checks determined the final content of census information. It was necesary to restrict the number of census questions to fewer than would have been desirable. The questionnaire included 5 household and 13 individual topics. Questions on live births and deaths in the household since 1981 were included, although not generally recommended. Age data is unusually accurate due to people's awareness of what animal sign they were born under. Housing questions were not asked in this census, but may be included in the next census. Sampling was used only in the small-scale post-enumeration survey. In China, the administrative network is so complete and reaches down to so small a unit that no further subdivision for census purposes is needed at all. A most unconventional feature of the censuses of China has been the virtually complete absence of mapping. An extensive program of 4887 pilot censuses ensured the success of the full census. The publicity effort involved 2-way communication from the national office to the public and back. The issue of confidentiality was felt to be problematical in China and best solved by not asking questions that people would be reluctant to answer. The method of enumeration differed greatly from the usual ones in that it centered on enumeration stations with home visits used to a lesser extent. Several questions were precoded, but the enumerator had to write in the number as well as circle the correct item. 10% advance tabulations were made for all units and found to be very representative.
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  14. 14
    034447

    The World Bank atlas, 1985.

    World Bank

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 1985. 28 p.

    This atlas presents data on population, gross national product (GNP), and GNP per capita for 1982 in current US dollars for 189 countries and territories. In addition, preliminary estimates for each of these indicators for 1983, annual growth rates for 1973-1982, data on life expectancy, infant mortality, and primary school enrollment are also included. Using color-coded maps of the world to designate different levels of various factors, the maps are easy to read. A comprehensive chart lists all statistics included in the maps. 1/5 of the world's population lives in China, 1/7 lives in India, and 1/10 in the US and USSR combined. 3/4 of the world's people live in developing countries; of 189 countries and territories, 114 have fewer than 10 million people, and 61 have fewer than 1 million people. Population growth in the developing countries peaked at 2.4% a year in 1965--that rate has fallen to 2.1% since then, with much of the decline occurring in China. Nearly 1/2 the world's people live in countries with an average 1982 GNP per capita of $270. During 1973-1982 the GNP per capita increased at a rate of 4% per year or more. Yet, one of the biggest changes in human life during the last 2 decades is that people in developing countries can expect to live much longer; 60 years for an infant born in 1982, compared with 45 years for an infant born in 1960. Primary education is much more widely available today than it was 20 years ago, especially for girls; the average enrollment for developing countries is up from 80% in 1960 to 96% in 1982.
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