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Your search found 8 Results

  1. 1
    375137

    Measuring gender equality.

    Posadas J; Paci P; Sajaia Z; Lokshin M

    Washington, D.C., International Bank for Reconstruction and Development / The World Bank, 2017 Apr. 302 p.

    Gender equality is a core development objective in its own right and also smart development policy and business practice. No society can develop sustainably without giving men and women equal power to shape their own lives and contribute to their families, communities, and countries. And yet, critical gender gaps continue to exist in all countries and across multiple dimensions. The gender module of the World Bank’s ADePT software platform produces a comprehensive set of tables and graphs using household surveys to help diagnose and analyze the prevailing gender inequalities at the country level and over time. This book provides a step-by-step guide to the use of the ADePT software and an introduction to its basic economic concepts and econometric methods. The module is organized around the framework proposed by the World Development Report 2012: Gender Equality and Development. It covers gender differences in outcomes in three primary dimensions of gender equality: human capital (or endowments), economic opportunities, and voice and agency. Particular focus is given to the analysis and decomposition techniques that allow for further exploring of gender gaps in economic opportunities.
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  2. 2
    335517

    The art of knowledge exchange: A results-focused planning guide for development practitioners. 2nd ed.

    Kumar S; Leonard A; Watkins R; Vovides Y; Kerby B

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 2013. [174] p.

    Knowledge exchange, or peer-to-peer learning, is a powerful way to share, replicate, and scale-up what works in development. Development practitioners increasingly seek to learn from the experiences of others who have gone through, or are going through, similar challenges. They want to have ready access to practical knowledge and solutions and enhance their confidence, conviction, and skills to customize the solutions to their own context. The second edition of the Art of Knowledge Exchange: A Results-Focused Planning Guide for Development Practitioners follows a strategic approach to learning and breaks down the knowledge exchange process into five simple steps. It also provides tools you need to design your knowledge exchange and practical guidance on how to use them to get the results you want from your knowledge exchange. This second edition contains a full revision of the original Art of Knowledge Exchange as well as new chapters on implementation and results of knowledge exchanges. The Guide also distills lessons from over 100 exchanges financed by South-South Facility, analytical work conducted by the World Bank Institute, and the Task Team for South-South Cooperation, and reflects the rich experiences of World Bank staff, learning professionals, government officials, and other practitioners engaged in South-South knowledge exchange activities.
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  3. 3
    333828

    The art of knowledge exchange: a results-focused planning guide for development practitioners.

    Kumar S; Leonard A

    [Washington, D.C.], World Bank, [2011]. [94] p. (\)

    Designing and implementing knowledge exchange initiatives can be a big undertaking. This guide takes the guesswork out of the process by breaking it down into simple steps and providing tools to help you play a more effective role as knowledge connector and learning facilitator. It will help you: identify and assess capacity development needs; design and develop an appropriate knowledge exchange initiative that responds to those needs; implement the knowledge exchange initiative; measure and report the results.
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  4. 4
    320919

    Integrating gender issues into HIV / AIDS programs: an operational guide.

    Ofosu-Amaah AW; Oppong MY

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, Gender and Development Group, 2004 Nov. [43] p.

    This Operational Guide provides specific guidance to national HIV/AIDS program management teams, public-sector ministries, private sector entities, and non-governmental and community-based organizations (NGOs/CBOs) implementing World Bank-financed HIV/AIDS programs and projects, as well as the World Bank's operational staff who design these programs and projects. It provides concrete examples of the integration of gender concerns into all stages of project preparation, implementation, monitoring and evaluation (M&E). The immediate objective is to provide the tools needed to identify and analyze gender-specific issues and concerns in HIV/AIDS programs and make appropriate provisions in HIV/AIDS operations to address these concerns. The ultimate goal of this Operational Guide is to enhance the effectiveness of HIV/AIDS interventions by ensuring that the gender inequalities that underlie the epidemic are addressed. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    284283

    Optimizing the allocation of resources for HIV prevention: the allocation by cost-effectiveness (ABC) model. Guidelines.

    World Bank

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 2002 Jul. 12 p.

    In the context of a growing HIV/AIDS epidemic and limited resources for prevention, the Allocation By Cost-Effectiveness Model (ABC Model) is designed to help policymakers decide how to distribute funds between different HIV prevention interventions to achieve the maximum impact on the epidemic. Specifically, policymakers can use the ABC Model to determine the resource allocation that will prevent the maximum number of new HIV infections at any given budget level. These guidelines present the Allocation By Cost-Effectiveness Model and show how it can be applied to a particular country or region. They are meant to be used in conjunction with the ABC Spreadsheet and give a detailed description of how to fill the ABC spreadsheet, how to read the output results, and what issues to consider when interpreting them. For a specific application of the ABC Model, refer to: Optimizing the Allocation of Resources among Prevention Interventions in Honduras. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    281982

    HIV / AIDS medicines and related supplies: contemporary context and procurement. Technical guide.

    Tayler Y; Abbott F; Perez Casas C; Fink C; Green C

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 2004 Feb. 103 p.

    This Guide sets out principles and advice for the procurement of HIV/AIDS medicines and related supplies for programs scaling up antiretroviral therapy (ART) and associated health services, such as basic and palliative care, disease prevention, treatment of opportunistic infections, and laboratory tests. ART includes the treatment of infected adults and children and the prevention of mother-to-child transmission. A wide range of other commodities— particularly condoms and support for basic living and care—are also essential to support the treatment and prevention of HIV. The primary audience for this guide is World Bank staff and those responsible for procuring HIV/AIDS medicines and related supplies in Bank-funded programs and projects. That could include either procurement agency staff or technical agency staff. Policymakers and Bank partners will also benefit from the information and advice in the guide. (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    274981

    Education and HIV / AIDS: a sourcebook of HIV / AIDS prevention programs.

    World Bank

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 2003. [395] p.

    This Sourcebook aims to support efforts by countries to strengthen the role of the education sector in the prevention of HIV/AIDS. It was developed in response to numerous requests for a simple forum to help countries share their practical experiences of designing and implementing programs that are targeted at school-age children. The Sourcebook seeks to fulfill this role by providing concise summaries of programs, using a standard format that highlights the main elements of the programs and makes it easier to compare the programs with each other. For many countries, HIV/AIDS is a newly recognized challenge to the education sector, and as a result, very few programs have been in place long enough to be formally evaluated. Rather than delaying access to program information until success was confirmed, the Sourcebook combines two approaches to offer some assurance of program quality. First, the programs were selected by national experts because they show promise where they have been implemented. Second, all the programs were benchmarked against criteria that the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) Inter-Agency Task Team (IATT) for Education considers to be sound programming practice. This provides a framework for exploring the strengths and weaknesses of the program design, pending more conclusive evaluation. The Sourcebook has been developed rapidly to fill an important gap in information on programming within the education sector. It is a work in progress, and the content will be expanded and refined in use. (excerpt)
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  8. 8
    084889

    International migration in North America, Europe, Central Asia, the Middle East and North Africa: research and research-related activities.

    Russell SS

    Geneva, Switzerland, United Nations, Economic Commission for Europe, 1993. v, 83 p.

    As a joint effort of the World Bank and the Economic Commission for Europe, the aim of this report was to identify international migration research and research-related activities in major political and institutional context, general overviews, and data sources, migration is discussed in terms of demography, international policies, economic and labor market aspects, highly skilled workers, development, integration, migration networks, ethnic relations, refugees and asylum seekers. East-west migration is also treated in a political and institutional context, with general overviews and data sources cited. The development and labor markets as well as ethnicity and return migration are considered. South-north migration is examined in a broad manner, with special emphasis on migration in the Mediterranean Basin and the Middle East. The review is meant to serve as a useful resource and as a stimulus for dialogue. Basic data are missing on east-west migration and labor, migration patterns within the Middle-East, and north-south movements other than from North Africa. Basic institutional sources for data and research on international migration are available from the Council of Europe; the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD); the International Labor Organization; the International Organization for Migration; the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees; the Intergovernmental Consultations on Asylum, Refugee, and Migration Policies in Europe, North America, and Australia; and the European Community. 13 major publications are primary sources of data, of which the most extensive is OECD's SOPEMI Report. 9 sources of data pertain to demographic aspects of migration. The 1986 SOPEMI report and updates document national policies and practices of entry control in OECD member countries; the UN Population Division also published a survey of population policies, including migration policies. The Commission of European Communities policies, including migration policies. The Commission of European Communities also publishes a document on noncommunity citizens. Researchers who have analyzed recent trends are identified, and research papers are cited for labor aspects of migration, highly skilled workers and migration, migration and development, integration and ethnic relations, migrant networks, refugees and asylum seekers, security, return migration, clandestine migration and ethical issues.
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