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Your search found 4 Results

  1. 1
    320919

    Integrating gender issues into HIV / AIDS programs: an operational guide.

    Ofosu-Amaah AW; Oppong MY

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, Gender and Development Group, 2004 Nov. [43] p.

    This Operational Guide provides specific guidance to national HIV/AIDS program management teams, public-sector ministries, private sector entities, and non-governmental and community-based organizations (NGOs/CBOs) implementing World Bank-financed HIV/AIDS programs and projects, as well as the World Bank's operational staff who design these programs and projects. It provides concrete examples of the integration of gender concerns into all stages of project preparation, implementation, monitoring and evaluation (M&E). The immediate objective is to provide the tools needed to identify and analyze gender-specific issues and concerns in HIV/AIDS programs and make appropriate provisions in HIV/AIDS operations to address these concerns. The ultimate goal of this Operational Guide is to enhance the effectiveness of HIV/AIDS interventions by ensuring that the gender inequalities that underlie the epidemic are addressed. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    129385

    Population issues briefing kit 1997.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 1997. 24 p.

    This UN Population Fund Briefing Kit for 1997 provides information on ten topics. The first discussion, on reproductive rights, reproductive health, and family planning (FP) is augmented by information on how FP saves lives by allowing women to properly time, space, and end births and on recognition of the human right to plan and regulate family size. Section 2 covers issues related to population, development, and the empowerment of women and reviews the mandates included in the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development, the 1995 World Summit for Social Development, and the 1995 Fourth World Conference on Women. Section 3 links population with sustainable development and environmental degradation and calls for recognition of the skill of women as effective managers of natural resources. The fourth section reviews population trends which estimate an annual increase in world population of 81 million people at a growth rate of 1.5%. Section 5 presents demographic trends by region and highlights the concepts of the "rate of natural increase" and of the "total fertility rate." Section 6 considers migration in terms of internal migration and urbanization and of international migration. The seventh section discusses information, education, and communication as a means of increasing the empowerment contained in the acquisition of knowledge. Section 8 covers the data barrier posed by the lack of reliable vital statistics and/or the failure to disaggregate data in many countries. Filling this data gap is shown to be a priority, especially in order to include the work of women in national accounting and censuses. Section 9 outlines the challenges for population programs in the 21st century, and the final section considers the necessity to craft policies to support the family in its role of providing support and protection for its members.
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  3. 3
    128463

    Claiming our rights: a manual for women's human rights education in Muslim societies.

    Afkhami M; Vaziri H

    Bethesda, Maryland, Sisterhood is Global Institute, 1996. [4], xiv, 168 p.

    This manual presents a multidimensional framework that allows grassroots Muslim women from various backgrounds to examine the relationship between their basic human rights as inscribed in major international documents and their culture. The introduction contains the manual's objective and background, the major international sources of women's rights, the major premises upon which the manual is based, the theoretical framework of the communication model (involving a communicator, an audience, a medium, and a message), the general structure of the model, and a note to facilitators. The next section presents the learning exercises that can be used by facilitators and participants to discuss women's rights 1) within the family; 2) to autonomy in family planning decisions; 3) to bodily integrity; 4) to subsistence; 5) to education and learning; 6) to employment and fair compensation; 7) to privacy, religious beliefs, and free expression; 8) during times of conflict; and 9) to political participation. Section 3 contains a workshop and facilitator evaluation form. Appendices contain auxiliary material such as relevant religious passages, descriptions of the first heroines of Islam, samples of Arabic proverbs concerning women, the text of international human rights instruments, and a list of various human rights and women's organizations in selected Muslim societies. The manual ends with an annotated bibliography.
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  4. 4
    127537

    Gender equity: concepts and tools for development.

    Centre for Development and Population Activities [CEDPA]

    Washington, D.C., CEDPA, 1996. [2], 43 p.

    This handbook reviews the field of gender and development to help development professionals incorporate gender analysis to improve their projects, programs, and institutions. The first section contributes to overall understanding of gender through a consideration of 1) the definition of "gender"; 2) the gender division of labor; 3) approaches to meet practical needs and fulfill strategic interests; and 4) the impact of gender on women's lives in terms of education, health, and employment. Section 2 traces and charts the evolution of thinking about women's development and the parallel changing pattern of women's development programs, contrasts the "Women in Development" and "Gender and Development" approaches, presents top-down and bottom-up strategies to improve gender equity, and lists UN milestones in promotion of the advancement of women. The third section presents gender training and analysis as the two most important tools for implementing gender-focused development. Critical elements for integrating gender into organizations are identified, and the following models for conducting gender analysis are considered: the contextual analysis model (used before a project starts), the Harvard Framework (used during a project), the Women's Empowerment Framework (analyses a project from a women's empowerment standpoint), and the Gender Analysis Matrix (used to understand community perceptions of a project). The final section of the manual reviews the commitment to improving gender equity contained in the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development and the Platform for Action of the Fourth World Conference on Women (WCW). Appendices provide a glossary of gender and development terms, a summary of the WCW Platform for Action, and a checklist for building gender equity into project design and implementation.
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