Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 6 Results

  1. 1
    339662

    Training manual to fight trafficking in children for labour, sexual and other forms of exploitation. Textbook 1: Understanding child trafficking.

    International Labour Office [ILO]. International Programme on the Elimination of Child Labour; UNICEF; United Nations. Global Initiative to Fight Human Trafficking

    Geneva, Switzerland, International Labour Organization, 2009. 51 p.

    This training manual is aimed at governments, workers, employer's groups, nongovernmental organizations, and international agencies working for children. It can be used in a training environment and as a stand-alone resource for those who wish to hone their understanding and skills in efforts to end child trafficking.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    339673

    Training manual to fight trafficking in children for labour, sexual and other forms of exploitation. Textbook 2: Action against child trafficking at policy and outreach levels.

    International Labour Office [ILO]. International Programme on the Elimination of Child Labour; UNICEF; United Nations. Global Initiative to Fight Human Trafficking

    Geneva, Switzerland, International Labour Organization, 2009. 48 p.

    This book focuses on actions that can be taken to prevent trafficking, protect children from being trafficked, pursue traffickers, and support trafficked children to rebuild their lives. These recommendations are categorized under four main headings commonly used to describe anti-trafficking actions: Broad protection: to prevent children and former victims from being (re)trafficked; Prevention: of the crime of child trafficking and the exploitation that is its end result; Law enforcement: in particular within a labor context and relating to labor laws and regulations; Victim assistance: covering the kinds of responses necessary to help trafficked children and to reduce their vulnerability to being re-trafficked.
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    315305

    Integrated Management of Childhood Illness: complementary course on HIV / AIDS.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Child and Adolescent Health and Development; UNICEF

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2006. [393] p.

    Even though children living with HIV/AIDS respond very well to treatment with antiretroviral therapy (ART), to date few children living with HIV/AIDS have access to ART mostly due to a lack of cheap feasible diagnostic tests for infants, lack of affordable child-friendly ARV drugs and lack of trained health personnel. This course aims to address the issue of lack of trained personnel. With an ever increasing burden of HIV and a high percentage of children infected, health workers urgently require accurate, up to date training and information on assessment and management of HIV in children. The IMCI complementary course on HIV is designed to assist health workers to assess, classify, treat and follow up HIV exposed infants and children, to identify the role of family and community in caring for the child with HIV/AIDS and also to enhance health workers' skills in counseling of caretakers around HIV/AIDS. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    312293

    WHO / UNICEF regional child survival strategy: accelerated and sustained action towards MDG 4.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for the Western Pacific; UNICEF. East Asia and the Pacific Regional Office

    Manila, Philippines, WHO, Regional Office for the Western Pacific. 2006. [42] p.

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Committee for the Western Pacific at its fifty-fourth session adopted resolution WPR/RC54.R9 that strongly urged Member States to place child health higher on their political, economic and health agendas and to allocate and utilize financial resources from all available sources to match the burden of childhood disease. This prompted a new drive to reduce child mortality in Member States, particularly in areas of greatest need. The renewed commitment and emphasis on childhood mortality reduction warrants a regional strategy for child survival that accommodates the most important life-saving interventions and leads to a childhood mortality reduction in the Region in line with the MDG. Action is required through resource mobilization, stronger outcome orientation, advocacy and monitoring that addresses the existing limitations in human and financial resources that currently prevent optimizing the delivery of life-saving interventions to improve child survival. WHO and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) have joined forces to develop this strategy. The document is intended for governments of Member States, policy-makers and partner agencies. This joint WHO/UNICEF Regional Child Survival Strategy was endorsed by the fifty-sixth session of the WHO Regional Committee for the Western Pacific. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  5. 5
    296295

    Emergency field handbook: a guide for UNICEF staff.

    UNICEF

    New York, New York, UNICEF, 2005 Jul. [420] p.

    Since its inception, UNICEF has provided life-saving assistance and assured protection for children in emergencies - both natural and man-made. Guiding UNICEF's response in humanitarian situations is the principle that children in the midst of natural disasters and armed conflict have the same needs and rights as children in stable situations. Emergencies have grown increasingly complex and their impact is especially devastating on the most vulnerable. In health and nutrition, water and sanitation, protection, education and HIV/AIDS, UNICEF's Core Commitments for Children in Emergencies are not merely a mission statement - they are a humanitarian imperative. UNICEF will keep these commitments and ensure a reliable, timely response in emergencies. The Core Commitments also provide a framework within which we work with our key national, United Nations and non-governmental partners to provide humanitarian assistance. This handbook has been developed as a practical tool for UNICEF field staff to meet the needs of children and women affected by disasters. It is the result of extensive consultation. We urge you to use it as an essential reference tool and to share it with our key partners. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  6. 6
    293308

    Integrated management of childhood.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Division of Child Health and Development; UNICEF

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, Division of Child Health and Development, 2002 Sep 3. 34 p.

    CHECK FOR GENERAL DANGER SIGNS: ASK: Is the child able to drink or breastfeed? Does the child vomit everything? Has the child had convulsions? LOOK: See if the child is lethargic or unconscious. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.