Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 8 Results

  1. 1
    375003

    WHO guidelines for the treatment of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2016. [56] p.

    Since the publication of the WHO Guidelines for the management of sexually transmitted infections in 2003, changes in the epidemiology of STIs and advancements in prevention, diagnosis and treatment necessitate changes in STI management. These guidelines provide updated treatment recommendations for common infections caused by C. trachomatis based on the most recent evidence; they form one of several modules of guidelines for specific STIs. It is strongly recommended that countries take updated global guidance into account as they establish standardized national protocols, adapting this guidance to the local epidemiological situation and antimicrobial susceptibility data. The objectives of these guidelines are: to provide evidence-based guidance on treatment of infection with C. trachomatis; and to support countries to update their national guidelines for treatment of chlamydial infection.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    375002

    WHO guidelines for the treatment of Treponema pallidum (syphilis).

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2016. [60] p.

    Since the publication of the WHO Guidelines for the management of sexually transmitted infections in 2003, changes in the epidemiology of STIs and advancements in prevention, diagnosis and treatment necessitate changes in STI management. These guidelines provide updated treatment recommendations for treatment of Treponema pallidum (syphilis) based on the most recent evidence. They form one of several modules of guidelines for specific STIs. It is strongly recommended that countries take updated global guidance into account as they establish standardized national protocols and adapt it to the local epidemiological situation and antimicrobial susceptibility data. The objectives of these guidelines are: to provide evidence-based guidance on treatment of infection with Treponema pallidum; and to support countries to update their national guidelines for treatment of Treponema pallidum.
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    375001

    WHO guidelines for the treatment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2016. [64] p.

    Since the publication of the WHO Guidelines for the management of sexually transmitted infections in 2003, changes in the epidemiology of STIs and advancements in prevention, diagnosis and treatment necessitate changes in STI management. There is an urgent need to update treatment recommendations for gonococcal infections to respond to changing antimicrobial resistance (AMR) patterns of N. gonorrhoeae. High-level resistance to previously recommended quinolones is widespread and decreased susceptibility to the extended-spectrum (third-generation) cephalosporins, another recommended first-line treatment in the 2003 guidelines, is increasing and several countries have reported treatment failures. These guidelines for the treatment of common infections caused by N. gonorrhoeae form one of several modules of guidelines for specific STIs. It is strongly recommended that countries take updated global guidance into account as they establish standardized national protocols, adapting this guidance to the local epidemiological situation and antimicrobial susceptibility data. The objectives of these guidelines are: to provide evidence-based guidance on treatment of infection with N. gonorrhoeae; and to support countries to update their national guidelines for treatment of gonococcal infection.
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    332557

    WHO Technical Consultation on Postpartum and Postnatal Care.

    Matthews M; Severin VX; Jelka Z

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], Department of Making Pregnancy Safer, 2010. [65] p. (WHO/MPS/10.03)

    On October 29, 2008, WHO Technical Consultation on Postpartum and Postnatal Care was held in Geneva, Switzerland. This report reflects the discussions, proceedings and recommendations for follow-up. The World Health Organization (WHO) is in the process of revising and updating its guidance on postpartum and postnatal care delivered by skilled providers. The purposes of the revision are to encourage and support broader provision of care and to foster a new, woman-centred concept of care that promotes health and sustains attention to dangerous complications. This consultation report also discusses follow up activities after the revision of the WHO guidance.
    Add to my documents.
  5. 5
    192154

    Scaling up antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings. Guidelines for a public health approach.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of HIV / AIDS

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, Department of HIV / AIDS, 2002. 163 p.

    These guidelines are part of the World Health Organization’s commitment to the global scale-up of antiretroviral therapy. Their development involved international consultative meetings throughout 2001, in which more than 200 clinicians, scientists, government representatives, representatives of civil society and people living with HIV/AIDS from more than 60 countries participated. The recommendations included in this document are largely based on a review of evidence and reflect the best current practices. Where the body of evidence was not conclusive, expert consensus was used as a basis for recommendations. We hope that this guidance will help Member countries as they work towards meeting the global target of having three million people on antiretroviral therapy by 2005. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  6. 6
    191651

    Female genital mutilation: the prevention and the management of the health complications. Policy guidelines for nurses and midwives.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Gender and Women’s Health; World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, Department of Gender and Women's Health, 2001. 16 p. (WHO/FCH/GWH/01.5; WHO/RHR/01.18)

    These guidelines are intended for use primarily by those responsible for developing policies and directing the working practices of nurses, midwives and other frontline health care providers. They are also intended to complement the training materials for nurses and midwives in the management of girls and women with FGM. The purpose of the policy guidelines is: to promote and strengthen the case against the medicalization of FGM; to support and protect nurses, midwives and other health personnel in adhering to WHO guidelines not to close an opened up infibulation; to empower nurses and midwives to carry out functions in relation to FGM which are outside their current legal scope of practice; and to encourage appropriate documentation of FGM in clinical records and health information system. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  7. 7
    191650

    Guidelines for using HIV testing technologies in surveillance: selection, evaluation, and implementation.

    UNAIDS / WHO Working Group on Global HIV / AIDS / STI Surveillance; United States. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC]

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2001. iv, 38 p. (WHO/CDS/CSR/EDC/2001.16; UNAIDS/01.22E)

    As the HIV/AIDS epidemic imposes an ever-larger burden globally, surveillance for HIV becomes more critical in order to understand the trends of the epidemic and to make sound decisions on how best to respond to it. This is especially true in developing countries, which account for a disproportionate share of new and long-standing infections. To help countries focus their surveillance activities in the context of their epidemic state (low-level, concentrated, or generalized), the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/ AIDS (UNAIDS) have developed a conceptual framework to improve HIV surveillance—second generation HIV surveillance. Guidelines for second generation HIV surveillance suggest approaches to make better use of data to increase and improve the response to the HIV epidemic. As biological surveillance (serosurveillance) is an important component of most HIV surveillance activities, an understanding of current HIV testing technologies is important. In the context of second generation HIV surveillance, these laboratory guidelines suggest methods for selecting, evaluating, and implementing HIV testing technologies and strategies based on a country’s laboratory infrastructure and surveillance needs. The guidelines provide recommendations for specimen selection, collection, storage, and testing and for the selection and evaluation of appropriate HIV testing strategies and technologies to meet surveillance objectives. Quality assurance issues are also addressed. These technical guidelines are written for HIV surveillance coordinators and other health professionals involved in HIV testing for surveillance purposes in developing countries. They are part of a series of operational guidelines for second generation HIV surveillance systems. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  8. 8
    191604

    Working document on monitoring and evaluating of national ART programmes in the rapid scale-up to 3 by 5.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, [2003]. 20 p.

    Currently, five to six million people infected with HIV in the developing world need access to antiretroviral (ARV) therapy to survive. Only 400,000 have this access. The failure to deliver ARVs to the millions of people who need them is a global health emergency. To address this emergency, WHO is fully committed to achieving the "3 by 5" target - getting three million people on ARVs by the end of 2005. This is a means to achieving the treatment goal: universal access to ARVS for all who need them. WHO will lead the effort, with UNAIDS and other partners, using its skills and experience in coordinating global responses to diseases such as the effective and rapid control of SARS. The monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of the 3 by 5 initiative is a high priority. It will be crucial to know how countries are meeting the agreed goals and objectives and how local levels (districts, Regions or Provinces) are monitoring progress and identifying any problems they may encounter. The need for a substantial amount of country input and ownership of the process will require a refinement of the M&E strategy in close consultation with countries. However, key components of the M&E strategy can be developed now, with further refinements and developments to come later. This document is a work in progress. It represents the best effort to describe a coherent approach to the monitoring and evaluation of scaling up to the reach the goal of 3 by 5 that is possible at this time. This working document is best viewed as a step in a process that will include field testing, the gathering of additional experience, additional review, the validation of indicators presented and subsequently refinement. If inadequacies are found in this working document, they are mostly the result of incomplete information and experience on which to base decisions. That will be corrected as experience mounts. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.