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  1. 1
    323933

    Monitoring human rights in contraceptive services and programmes.

    Gruskin S; Kumar S; Nicholson A; Ali M; Khosla R

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2017. 73 p.

    This tool for Monitoring human rights in contraceptive services and programmes contributes to the World Health Organization’s (WHO’s) ongoing work on rights-based contraceptive programmes. This work builds directly on WHO’s 2014 Ensuring human rights within contraceptive programmes: a human rights analysis of existing quantitative indicators and the 2015 publication Ensuring human rights within contraceptive service delivery implementation guide by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and WHO. This tool is intended for use by countries to assist them in strengthening their human rights efforts in contraceptive programming. The tool uses existing commonly-used indicators to highlight areas where human rights have been promoted, neglected or violated in contraceptive programming; gaps in programming and in data collection; and opportunities for action within the health sector and beyond, including opportunities for partnership initiatives.
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  2. 2
    323639

    Programme reporting standards for sexual, reproductive, maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2017. 32 p.

    Information about design, context, implementation, monitoring and evaluation is central to understanding the processes and impacts of sexual, reproductive, maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health (SRMNCAH) programmes, in support of effective replication and scale-up of these efforts. Existing reporting guidelines do not demand sufficient detail in the reporting of contextual and implementation issues. We have, therefore, developed programme reporting standards (PRS) to provide guidance for complete and accurate reporting on the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation processes of SRMNCAH programmes. The PRS can be used by SRMNCAH programme implementers and researchers. The PRS can be used prospectively to guide the reporting of a programme throughout its life cycle, or retrospectively to describe what was done, when, where, how and by whom. The PRS is intended as a guide for implementation researchers who need to document important details of implementation and context in addition to the results of their studies. The PRS is intended for programme managers and other staff or practitioners who have designed, implemented and/or evaluated SRMNCAH programmes. It can be used by governmental and nongovernmental organizations, bilateral and multilateral agencies, as well as by the private sector. The PRS is also intended as a guide for implementation researchers who need to document important details of implementation and context in addition to the results of their studies
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  3. 3
    355272

    Global standards for quality health care services for adolescents. A guide to implement a standards-driven approach to improve the quality of health-care services for adolescents. Volume 4: Scoring sheets for data analysis.

    Chatterjee S; Baltag V

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization, 2015. 132 p.

    Global initiatives are urging countries to prioritize quality as a way of reinforcing human rights-based approaches to health. Yet evidence from both high- and low-income countries shows that services for adolescents are highly fragmented, poorly coordinated and uneven in quality. Pockets of excellent practice exist, but, overall, services need significant improvement and should be brought into conformity with existing guidelines. The aim of Global standards for quality health-care services for adolescents is to assist policy-makers and health service planners in improving the quality of health-care services so that adolescents find it easier to obtain the health services that they need to promote, protect and improve their health and well-being. This volume is to be used in conjunction with the monitoring tools in Volume 3. Using this data analysis method, countries can determine compliance with quality standards. How to use this volume: The scoring sheets in this volume are organized by criterion. There is a separate scoring sheet for each criterion. The total scores for all the criteria that apply to a standard are averaged to yield an overall score for that standard.
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  4. 4
    355271

    Global standards for quality health care services for adolescents. A guide to implement a standards-driven approach to improve the quality of health-care services for adolescents. Volume 3: Tools to conduct quality and coverage measurement surveys to collect data about compliance with the global standards.

    Chatterjee S; Baltag V

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization, 2015. 100 p.

    Global initiatives are urging countries to prioritize quality as a way of reinforcing human rights-based approaches to health. Yet evidence from both high- and low-income countries shows that services for adolescents are highly fragmented, poorly coordinated and uneven in quality. Pockets of excellent practice exist, but, overall, services need significant improvement and should be brought into conformity with existing guidelines. The aim of Global standards for quality health-care services for adolescents is to assist policy-makers and health service planners in improving the quality of health-care services so that adolescents find it easier to obtain the health services that they need to promote, protect and improve their health and well-being. This volume includes tools to determine whether the implementation of the standards has been achieved. These tools can be adapted for use in different contexts -be it self-assessments on a limited number of criteria, or external assessments (monitoring visits) by district managers, on a wider, or full range, of standards and criteria. The tools can be equally adapted to develop checklists for supportive supervision. The toolkit included in this volume contains seven tools to collect data about quality of care (as measured by the criteria of the standards) and two tools to gather information about coverage.
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  5. 5
    355270

    Global standards for quality health care services for adolescents. A guide to implement a standards-driven approach to improve the quality of health-care services for adolescents. Volume 2: Implementation guide.

    Chatterjee S; Baltag V

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization, 2015. 28 p.

    Global initiatives are urging countries to prioritize quality as a way of reinforcing human rights-based approaches to health. Yet evidence from both high- and low-income countries shows that services for adolescents are highly fragmented, poorly coordinated and uneven in quality. Pockets of excellent practice exist, but, overall, services need significant improvement and should be brought into conformity with existing guidelines. The aim of Global standards for quality health-care services for adolescents is to assist policy-makers and health service planners in improving the quality of health-care services so that adolescents find it easier to obtain the health services that they need to promote, protect and improve their health and well-being. This volume, the Implementation guide, provides detailed guidance on identifying what actions need to be taken to implement the standards at the national, district and facility levels. It can be used to develop checklists to assess the status of implementation.
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  6. 6
    355269

    Global standards for quality health care services for adolescents. A guide to implement a standards-driven approach to improve the quality of health-care services for adolescents. Volume 1: Standards and criteria.

    Chatterjee S; Baltag V

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization, 2015 40 p.

    Global initiatives are urging countries to prioritize quality as a way of reinforcing human rights-based approaches to health. Yet evidence from both high- and low-income countries shows that services for adolescents are highly fragmented, poorly coordinated and uneven in quality. Pockets of excellent practice exist, but, overall, services need significant improvement and should be brought into conformity with existing guidelines. The aim of Global standards for quality health-care services for adolescents is to assist policy-makers and health service planners in improving the quality of health-care services so that adolescents find it easier to obtain the health services that they need to promote, protect and improve their health and well-being. The implementation plan and the monitoring tools that accompany the standards in this document provide guidance on identifying what actions need to be taken to implement the standards and to assess whether the standards have been achieved. The primary intention of the standards is to improve the quality of care for adolescents in government healthcare services; however, they are equally applicable to facilities run by NGOs and those in the private sector. The ultimate purpose of implementing the standards is to increase adolescents’ use of services and, thus, to contribute to better health outcomes.
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  7. 7
    374002
    Peer Reviewed

    Development, updates, and future directions of the World Health Organization Selected Practice Recommendations for Contraceptive Use.

    Chen MJ; Kim CR; Whitehouse KC; Berry-Bibee E; Gaffield ME

    International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics. 2016 Dec 13; 7 p.

    Correct and consistent use of contraception decreases the risk of unintended pregnancy; yet, outdated policies or practices can delay initiation or hinder continuation of contraceptive methods. To promote the quality of, and access to, family planning services, WHO created a series of evidence-based guidance documents for family planning, known as WHO's Four Cornerstones of Family Planning Guidance. The Medical eligibility criteria for contraceptive use (MEC), first published in 1996, provides guidance on the safety of various contraceptive methods in users with specific health conditions or characteristics (i.e. who can use a contraceptive method safely). The Selected practice recommendations for contraceptive use (SPR) is the second cornerstone, outlining how to safely and effectively use contraceptive methods. These two documents can serve as a reference for policymakers and program managers as they develop their own national family planning policies in the context of local needs, values, and resources. The two other cornerstone documents -- the Decision making tool for family planning clients and providers and Family planning: a global handbook for providers -- provide guidance to healthcare providers for applying these recommendations in practice. Between 2013 and 2014, WHO convened a Guideline Development Group (GDG) to review and update the MEC and SPR in line with current evidence. As a result of these meetings, the fifth edition of the MEC was published in 2015, and the third edition of the SPR will be released on December 14, 2016. The purpose of the present report is to describe the methods used to develop the SPR recommendations, research gaps identified during the guideline development process, and future directions for the dissemination and implementation of the SPR among policymakers and family planning program managers worldwide. (excerpt)
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  8. 8
    375167

    WHO recommendations on antenatal care for a positive pregnancy experience.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research; World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Nutrition for Health and Development; World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Maternal, Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2016. 172 p.

    The World Health Organization has released a new set of antenatal care (ANC) recommendations to improve maternal and perinatal health worldwide. The guidelines seek to reduce the global burden of stillbirths, reduce pregnancy complications and provide all women and adolescents with a positive pregnancy experience. High quality health care during pregnancy and childbirth can prevent deaths from pregnancy complications, perinatal deaths and stillbirths, yet globally, less than two-thirds of women receive antenatal care at least four times throughout their pregnancy. The new ANC model raises the recommended number of ANC visits from four to eight, thereby increasing the number of opportunities providers have to detect and address preventable complications related to pregnancy and childbirth. The guidelines provide 49 recommendations for routine and context-specific ANC visits, including nutritional interventions, maternal / fetal assessments, preventive measures, interventions for common physiological symptoms and health system interventions. Given that women around the world experience maternal care in a wide range of settings, the recommendations also outline several context-specific service delivery options, including midwife-led care, group care and community-based interventions.
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  9. 9
    375003

    WHO guidelines for the treatment of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2016. [56] p.

    Since the publication of the WHO Guidelines for the management of sexually transmitted infections in 2003, changes in the epidemiology of STIs and advancements in prevention, diagnosis and treatment necessitate changes in STI management. These guidelines provide updated treatment recommendations for common infections caused by C. trachomatis based on the most recent evidence; they form one of several modules of guidelines for specific STIs. It is strongly recommended that countries take updated global guidance into account as they establish standardized national protocols, adapting this guidance to the local epidemiological situation and antimicrobial susceptibility data. The objectives of these guidelines are: to provide evidence-based guidance on treatment of infection with C. trachomatis; and to support countries to update their national guidelines for treatment of chlamydial infection.
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  10. 10
    375002

    WHO guidelines for the treatment of Treponema pallidum (syphilis).

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2016. [60] p.

    Since the publication of the WHO Guidelines for the management of sexually transmitted infections in 2003, changes in the epidemiology of STIs and advancements in prevention, diagnosis and treatment necessitate changes in STI management. These guidelines provide updated treatment recommendations for treatment of Treponema pallidum (syphilis) based on the most recent evidence. They form one of several modules of guidelines for specific STIs. It is strongly recommended that countries take updated global guidance into account as they establish standardized national protocols and adapt it to the local epidemiological situation and antimicrobial susceptibility data. The objectives of these guidelines are: to provide evidence-based guidance on treatment of infection with Treponema pallidum; and to support countries to update their national guidelines for treatment of Treponema pallidum.
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  11. 11
    375001

    WHO guidelines for the treatment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2016. [64] p.

    Since the publication of the WHO Guidelines for the management of sexually transmitted infections in 2003, changes in the epidemiology of STIs and advancements in prevention, diagnosis and treatment necessitate changes in STI management. There is an urgent need to update treatment recommendations for gonococcal infections to respond to changing antimicrobial resistance (AMR) patterns of N. gonorrhoeae. High-level resistance to previously recommended quinolones is widespread and decreased susceptibility to the extended-spectrum (third-generation) cephalosporins, another recommended first-line treatment in the 2003 guidelines, is increasing and several countries have reported treatment failures. These guidelines for the treatment of common infections caused by N. gonorrhoeae form one of several modules of guidelines for specific STIs. It is strongly recommended that countries take updated global guidance into account as they establish standardized national protocols, adapting this guidance to the local epidemiological situation and antimicrobial susceptibility data. The objectives of these guidelines are: to provide evidence-based guidance on treatment of infection with N. gonorrhoeae; and to support countries to update their national guidelines for treatment of gonococcal infection.
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  12. 12
    335271

    Monitoring national cervical cancer prevention and control programmes: quality control and quality assurance for visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA)-based programmes.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; Pan American Health Organization [PAHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2013. [41] p.

    This guide outlines quality control (QC) and quality assurance (QA) considerations to support introduction or scale-up of visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) as a screening test for cervical cancer, within the context of national comprehensive cervical cancer prevention and control programmes. The guide proposes a framework for QC and QA including a core set of indicators, and provides examples for how the indicators can be set, measured and used to strengthen programme implementation. The guide is intended primarily for programme managers, supervisors and other stakeholders working in public health programmes for cervical cancer prevention and control.
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  13. 13
    334706

    Indoor residual spraying: an operational manual for indoor residual spraying (IRS) for malaria transmission control and elimination.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2013. [116] p.

    This manual has been created to enhance existing knowledge and skills, and to assist malaria programme managers, entomologists and vector control and public health officers to design, implement and sustain high quality IRS programmes. Though comprehensive, this manual is not intended to replace field expertise in IRS. The manual is divided into three chapters: IRS policy, strategy and standards for national policy makers and programme managers; IRS management, including stewardship and safe use of insecticides, for both national programme managers and district IRS coordinators; IRS spray application guidelines, primarily for district IRS coordinators, supervisors and team leaders. This manual will enable national programmes to: develop or refine national policies and strategies on vector control; develop or update existing national guidelines; develop or update existing national training materials; review access and coverage of IRS programmes; review the quality and impact of IRS programmes.
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  14. 14
    358772

    Male latex condom specification, prequalification and guidelines for procurement, 2010.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]; United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]; Family Health International [FHI]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2010. 152 p.

    Consistent and correct use of condoms is vital to achieve the level of protection required to prevent unintended pregnancy and the transmission of HIV and other STIs. Another vital factor is the quality of the product. If condoms leak or break, they cannot offer adequate protection. In many programmes attention tends to be focused on the condom user and the promotion of condoms. Often, inadequate attention is paid to ensuring, as a key component of a comprehensive condom programming strategy, that a quality product is manufactured, purchased, stored, distributed and handled properly. The male latex condom is an important medical device, and its manufacture needs to be regulated and controlled as such.This document describes a technically sound, systematic process to support the manufacture, prequalification, procurement and distribution of a quality product that can meet the needs of different populations in a broad spectrum of challenging environmental conditions. It is intended primarily for any policy-maker, manager or procurement officer who has the responsibility for procuring, supplying and promoting natural latex male condoms.
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  15. 15
    334568

    Making health services adolescent friendly: Developing national quality standards for adolescent friendly health services.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Maternal, Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2012. [56] p.

    This guidebook sets out the public health rationale for making it easier for adolescents to obtain the health services that they need to protect and improve their health and well-being, including sexual and reproductive health services. It defines ‘adolescent-friendly health services’ from the perspective of quality, and provides step-by-step guidance on developing quality standards for health service provision to adolescents. Drawing upon international experience, it is also tailored to national epidemiological, social, cultural and economic realities, and provides guidance on identifying what actions need to be taken to assess whether appropriate standards have been achieved.
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  16. 16
    353472

    Practical guidelines for supporting EDUCAIDS implementation.

    Greenall M

    Paris, France, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization [UNESCO], 2012. 158 p.

    The education sector has a significant role to play in the response to HIV and AIDS. The sector can help to prevent the spread of HIV through education, and, in countries that are highly affected by HIV, by taking steps to protect itself from the effects of the epidemic. It can also make a significant contribution by supporting health improvement more generally and by helping to improve the sexual and reproductive health of young people in particular.This framework is designed to help those working in the education sector at a national level to understand the need for a robust response to HIV and AIDS in order to achieve Education for All (EFA) and the education-related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The document also highlights the education sector’s role in contributing to universal access to HIV and AIDS prevention, treatment, care and support.
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  17. 17
    333111

    Human rights and gender equality in health sector strategies. How to assess policy coherence.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; United Nations. Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights [OHCHR]; Sweden. Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency [SIDA]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2011. [163] p.

    This tool, developed in collaboration between WHO, the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) and the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (Sida) is designed to support countries to strengthen national health strategies by applying human rights and gender equality commitments and obligations. The tool poses critical questions to identify gaps and opportunities in the review or reform of health sector strategies.
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  18. 18
    332557

    WHO Technical Consultation on Postpartum and Postnatal Care.

    Matthews M; Severin VX; Jelka Z

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], Department of Making Pregnancy Safer, 2010. [65] p. (WHO/MPS/10.03)

    On October 29, 2008, WHO Technical Consultation on Postpartum and Postnatal Care was held in Geneva, Switzerland. This report reflects the discussions, proceedings and recommendations for follow-up. The World Health Organization (WHO) is in the process of revising and updating its guidance on postpartum and postnatal care delivered by skilled providers. The purposes of the revision are to encourage and support broader provision of care and to foster a new, woman-centred concept of care that promotes health and sustains attention to dangerous complications. This consultation report also discusses follow up activities after the revision of the WHO guidance.
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  19. 19
    339653

    Rapid advice: antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection in adults and adolescents.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of HIV / AIDS

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2009 Nov. 25 p.

    Based on the latest scientific evidence, the World Health Organization (WHO) has released new recommendations on HIV treatment and prevention and infant feeding in the context of HIV. WHO now recommends earlier initiation of antiretroviral therapy for adults and adolescents, the delivery of more patient-friendly antiretroviral drugs (ARVs), and prolonged use of ARVs to reduce the risk of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. For the first time, WHO recommends that HIV-positive mothers or their infants take ARVs while breastfeeding to prevent HIV transmission.
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  20. 20
    342429
    Peer Reviewed

    Antiretroviral resistance patterns and HIV-1 subtype in mother-infant pairs after the administration of combination short-course zidovudine plus single-dose nevirapine for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV.

    Chalermchockcharoenkit A; Culnane M; Chotpitayasunondh T; Vanprapa N; Leelawiwat W; Mock PA; Asavapiriyanont S; Teeraratkul A; McConnell MS; McNicholl JM; Tappero JW

    Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2009 Jul 15; 49(2):299-305.

    BACKGROUND: World Health Organization guidelines for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) recommend administration of zidovudine and single-dose nevirapine (NVP) for HIV-1-infected women who are not receiving treatment for their own health or if complex regimens are not available. This study assessed antiretroviral resistance patterns among HIV-infected women and infants receiving single-dose NVP in Thailand, where the predominant circulating HIV-1 strains are CRF01_AE recombinants and where the minority are subtype B. METHODS: Venous blood samples were obtained from (1) HIV-infected women who received zidovudine from 34 weeks' gestation and single-dose NVP plus oral zidovudine during labor and (2) HIV-infected infants who received single-dose NVP after birth plus zidovudine for 4 weeks after delivery. HIV-1 drug resistance testing was performed using the TruGene assay (Bayer HealthCare). RESULTS: Most mothers and infants were infected with CRF01_AE. NVP resistance was detected in 34 (18%) of 190 women and 2 (20%) of 10 infants. There was a significantly higher proportion of NVP mutations in women with delivery viral loads of >50,000 copies/mL (adjusted odds ratio, 8.5; 95% confidence interval, 2.2-32.8, [Formula: see text] for linear trend) and in those with subtype B rather than CRF01_AE infections (38% vs. 16%; adjusted odds ratio, 3.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-11.8; P = .038). CONCLUSIONS: The lower frequency of NVP mutations among mothers infected with subtype CRF01_AE, compared with mothers infected with subtype B, suggests that individuals infected with subtype CRF01_AE may be less susceptible to the induction of NVP resistance than are individuals infected with subtype B.
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  21. 21
    321121

    UNAIDS practical guidelines for intensifying HIV prevention: Towards universal access.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2007. [66] p. (UNAIDS/07.07E; JC1274E)

    These Practical Guidelines for Intensifying HIV Prevention: Towards Universal Access are designed to provide policy makers and planners with practical guidance to tailor their national HIV prevention response so that they respond to the epidemic dynamics and social context of the country and populations who remain most vulnerable to and at risk of HIV infection. They have been developed in consultation with the UNAIDS cosponsors, international collaborating partners, government, civil society leaders and other experts. They build on Intensifying HIV Prevention: UNAIDS Policy Position Paper and the UNAIDS Action Plan on Intensifying HIV Prevention. In 2006, governments committed themselves to scaling up HIV prevention and treatment responses to ensure universal access by 2010. While in the past five years treatment access has expanded rapidly, the number of new HIV infections has not decreased - estimated at 4.3 (3.6-6.6) million in 2006 - with many people unable to access prevention services to prevent HIV infection. These Guidelines recognize that to sustain the advances in antiretroviral treatment and to ensure true universal access requires that prevention services be scaled up simultaneously with treatment. (excerpt)
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  22. 22
    319155
    Peer Reviewed

    IAP Guidelines 2006 on hospital based management of severely malnourished children (adapted from the WHO guidelines).

    Bhatnagar S; Lodha R; Choudhury P; Sachdev HP; Shah N

    Indian Pediatrics. 2007 Jun 17; 44(6):443-461.

    Malnutrition in children is widely prevalent in India. It is estimated that 57 million children are underweight (moderate and severe). More than 50% of deaths in 0-4 years are associated with malnutrition. The median case fatality rate is approximately 23.5% in severe malnutrition, reaching 50% in edematous malnutrition. There is a need for standardized protocol-based management to improve the outcome of severely malnourished children. In 2006, Indian Academy of Pediatrics undertook the task of developing guidelines for the management of severely malnourished children based on adaptation from the WHO guidelines. We summarize below the revised consensus recommendations (and wherever relevant the rationale) of the group. (excerpt)
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  23. 23
    311687

    Fulfilling reproductive rights for women affected by HIV / AIDS. A tool for monitoring progress toward three Millennium Development Goals. Updated version.

    de Bruyn M

    Chapel Hill, North Carolina, Ipas, 2006 Aug. 20 p.

    In 2004, more than 25 national and international organizations presented a statement to the secretariat of the United Nations (UN) Commission on the Status of Women that highlighted relatively neglected areas in the reproductive health of women affected by HIV/AIDS. In collaboration with the International Community of Women Living with HIV/AIDS (ICW), the Center for Health and Gender Equity (CHANGE) and the Pacific Institute for Women's Health, Ipas used that statement and a literature review to develop this practical tool to help nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) address those neglected areas of reproductive health. Since the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) have become a common framework for assessing progress in development, the tool links those areas of reproductive health to three of the MDGs related to empowering women, improving maternal health and combating HIV/AIDS. This document is an updated version of the original resource published in 2004. Changes were made after the eight partner NGOs listed below piloted the benchmarks in 11 developing countries. (excerpt)
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  24. 24
    299727

    Monitoring the Declaration of Commitment on HIV / AIDS: guidelines on construction of core indicators.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2005 Jul. 106 p. (UNAIDS/05.17E)

    The primary purpose of this document is to provide key constituents, who are actively involved in an individual country's response to HIV and AIDS, with essential information on core indicators that measure the effectiveness of the national response. These guidelines will also help ensure the transparency of the process used by national governments and UNAIDS to prepare progress reports on implementation of the UNGASS Declaration of Commitment on HIV/AIDS. Countries are strongly encouraged to integrate the core indicators into their ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities. These indicators are designed to help countries assess the current state of their national response while simultaneously contributing to a better understanding of the global response to the AIDS pandemic, including progress towards meeting the Declaration of Commitment targets. Given the parallel applications of the indicators, the guidelines in this document are designed to improve the quality and consistency of data collected at country level, which will enhance the accuracy of conclusions drawn from the data at both regional and global levels. This document also includes an overview of global indicators that will be used by UNAIDS and its partners to assess key components of the response that are best measured on a worldwide basis. (excerpt)
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  25. 25
    290366

    Interim WHO clinical staging of HIV / AIDS and HIV / AIDS case definitions for surveillance. African region.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2005. [46] p. (WHO/HIV/2005.02)

    With a view to facilitating the scale-up of access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the African Region the present document outlines recent revisions made by WHO to the clinical staging of HIV/AIDS and to case definitions for HIV/AIDS disease surveillance. These interim guidelines are based on an international drafting meeting held in Saas Fee in June 2004 and on recommendations made by experts from African countries at a meeting held in Nairobi in December of the same year. The revisions to the clinical staging target professionals ranging from senior consultants in teaching and referral hospitals to surveillance officers and first-level health care providers, all of whom have important roles in caring for people living with HIV and AIDS (PLWHA), including children. It is proposed that countries review, adapt and repackage the guidelines as appropriate for specific tasks at different levels of health service delivery. It is hoped that national HIV/ AIDS programmes in African countries will thus be assisted to develop, revise or strengthen their ART guidelines, patient monitoring and surveillance efforts. The interim clinical staging and revised definitions for surveillance are currently being reviewed in the other WHO regions and will be finalized at a global meeting to be held in September 2005. (excerpt)
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