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Your search found 5 Results

  1. 1
    326566

    Care of girls and women living with female genital mutilation. A clinical handbook.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2018. 458 p.

    Girls and women who have been subjected to female genital mutilation (FGM) need high quality, empathetic and appropriate health care to meet their specific needs. This handbook is for health care providers involved in the care of girls and women who have been subjected to any form of FGM. This includes obstetricians and gynaecologists, surgeons, general medical practitioners, midwives, nurses and other country-specific health professionals. Health-care professionals providing mental health care, and educational and psychosocial support – such as psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers and health educators – will also find this handbook helpful. It includes advice on how to: 1) communicate effectively and sensitively with girls and women who have developed health complications due to FGM; 2) communicate effectively and sensitively with the husbands or partners and family members of those affected; 3) provide quality health care to girls and women who have health problems due to FGM, including immediate and short-term urogynaecological or obstetric complications; 4) provide support to women who have mental health and sexual health complications caused by FGM; 5) make informed decisions on how and when to perform deinfibulation; 6) identify when and where to refer patients who need additional support and care; and 7) work with patients and families to prevent the practice of FGM.
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  2. 2
    375880

    Strengthening health systems to respond to women subjected to intimate partner violence or sexual violence: a manual for health managers.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2017. 172 p.

    This manual is intended for health managers at all levels of the health systems. The manual is based on the World Health Organization (WHO) guideline Responding to intimate partner violence and sexual violence against women: WHO clinical and policy guidelines, 2013. Those guidelines inform this manual and its companion clinical handbook for healthcare providers, Health care for women subjected to intimate partner violence or sexual violence, 2014. The manual draws on the WHO health systems building blocks as outlined in Everybody’s business: strengthening health systems to improve health outcomes: WHO’s framework for action..
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  3. 3
    375409

    Caring for newborns and children in the community. Planning handbook for programme managers and planners.

    Marsh D; Shirey PW

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization, Department of Maternal, Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health, 2015. 168 p.

    Prevention and treatment services need to be brought closer to children who are not adequately reached by the health system. To help meet this need, WHO and UNICEF have developed state-of-the-art packages to enable community health workers to care for pregnant women, newborns and children. Caring for Newborns and Children in the Community comprises three packages of materials for training and support of CHWs. Countries will assess their current community-based services and choose to what extent they are able to implement these packages for improving child and maternal health and survival: (1) Caring for the newborn at home, (2) caring for the child's healthy growth and development, (3) caring for the sick child in the community.
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  4. 4
    281421

    Feeding the non-breastfed child 6-24 months of age, Geneva, 8-10 March 2004. Meeting report.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Child and Adolescent Health and Development; World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Nutrition for Health and Development

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2004. [28] p. (WHO/FCH/CAH/04.13)

    According to current UN recommendations, infants should be exclusively breastfed for the first six months of life, and thereafter should receive appropriate complementary feeding with continued breastfeeding up to two years or beyond. However, there are a number of infants who will not enjoy the benefits of breastfeeding in the early months of life or for whom breastfeeding will not occur or will stop before the recommended duration of two years or beyond. A group that calls for particular attention is the infants of mothers who are known to be HIV positive. To reduce the risk of transmission, it is recommended that, when acceptable, feasible, affordable, sustainable and safe, these mothers give replacement feeding from birth. Otherwise, they should breastfeed exclusively and stop as soon as alternative feeding options become feasible. Another group includes those infants whose mothers have died, or who for some reason do not breastfeed. Recommendations for appropriate feeding of breastfed infants from six months onwards have been summarized by PAHO in the publication Guiding Principles for Complementary Feeding of the Breastfed Child. Some of these guiding principles are not applicable to non breast fed children, others need adaptation. WHO convened this informal meeting to identify an analogous set of guiding principles for feeding of non-breastfed children after six months of age. For infants less than six months, guidelines for decision makers and a guide for health care manager are already available. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    099740

    Care of mother and baby at the health centre: a practical guide. Report of a technical working group.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Division of Family Health. Maternal Health and Safe Motherhood Programme

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, Division of Family Health, Maternal Health and Safe Motherhood Programme, 1994. [3], 55 p. (Safe Motherhood Practical Guide; WHO/FHE/MSM/94.2)

    This report is designed for health planners and program managers to improve access to health and to decentralize maternal and newborn health care. It covers secondary care services that traditional birth attendants (TBAs), midwives, and other nonphysician health workers in health centers can perform. Specifically, it defines the tasks and skills required to provide comprehensive care of mother and infant at the health center and in the community. It also looks at the role of the health center in training, supervision, and continuing logistic support for community based care. The first chapter examines the health center's role in maternal health and the 3 approaches to integrated care: vertical integration, integration across time, and horizontal integration. The next chapter reviews the essential elements of obstetric and neonatal care, including sexually transmitted diseases and HIV/AIDS. Topics discussed in the chapter on developing and maintaining a functional referral system include referral protocols, functional links with referral centers, obstetric first aid, maternity waiting homes, transport and communication, and reception of referred cases in referral centers. Institutional support mechanisms (chapter 4) are training; teamwork and supervision; logistics, maintenance, and essential drugs and supplies; management, communication, and interpersonal skills; and data collection and research. Topics included in the chapter on community support systems are TBA training and retraining, integrating the TBA into the health care system, IEC, and community support mechanisms for the health of mothers and newborns. The last chapter revolves around evaluation and monitoring, including estimating catchment area and coverage, monitoring quality of care for mothers and newborns, performance indicators, record keeping, and home-based maternal records.
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