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Your search found 10 Results

  1. 1
    375003

    WHO guidelines for the treatment of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2016. [56] p.

    Since the publication of the WHO Guidelines for the management of sexually transmitted infections in 2003, changes in the epidemiology of STIs and advancements in prevention, diagnosis and treatment necessitate changes in STI management. These guidelines provide updated treatment recommendations for common infections caused by C. trachomatis based on the most recent evidence; they form one of several modules of guidelines for specific STIs. It is strongly recommended that countries take updated global guidance into account as they establish standardized national protocols, adapting this guidance to the local epidemiological situation and antimicrobial susceptibility data. The objectives of these guidelines are: to provide evidence-based guidance on treatment of infection with C. trachomatis; and to support countries to update their national guidelines for treatment of chlamydial infection.
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  2. 2
    375002

    WHO guidelines for the treatment of Treponema pallidum (syphilis).

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2016. [60] p.

    Since the publication of the WHO Guidelines for the management of sexually transmitted infections in 2003, changes in the epidemiology of STIs and advancements in prevention, diagnosis and treatment necessitate changes in STI management. These guidelines provide updated treatment recommendations for treatment of Treponema pallidum (syphilis) based on the most recent evidence. They form one of several modules of guidelines for specific STIs. It is strongly recommended that countries take updated global guidance into account as they establish standardized national protocols and adapt it to the local epidemiological situation and antimicrobial susceptibility data. The objectives of these guidelines are: to provide evidence-based guidance on treatment of infection with Treponema pallidum; and to support countries to update their national guidelines for treatment of Treponema pallidum.
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  3. 3
    375001

    WHO guidelines for the treatment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2016. [64] p.

    Since the publication of the WHO Guidelines for the management of sexually transmitted infections in 2003, changes in the epidemiology of STIs and advancements in prevention, diagnosis and treatment necessitate changes in STI management. There is an urgent need to update treatment recommendations for gonococcal infections to respond to changing antimicrobial resistance (AMR) patterns of N. gonorrhoeae. High-level resistance to previously recommended quinolones is widespread and decreased susceptibility to the extended-spectrum (third-generation) cephalosporins, another recommended first-line treatment in the 2003 guidelines, is increasing and several countries have reported treatment failures. These guidelines for the treatment of common infections caused by N. gonorrhoeae form one of several modules of guidelines for specific STIs. It is strongly recommended that countries take updated global guidance into account as they establish standardized national protocols, adapting this guidance to the local epidemiological situation and antimicrobial susceptibility data. The objectives of these guidelines are: to provide evidence-based guidance on treatment of infection with N. gonorrhoeae; and to support countries to update their national guidelines for treatment of gonococcal infection.
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  4. 4
    321121

    UNAIDS practical guidelines for intensifying HIV prevention: Towards universal access.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2007. [66] p. (UNAIDS/07.07E; JC1274E)

    These Practical Guidelines for Intensifying HIV Prevention: Towards Universal Access are designed to provide policy makers and planners with practical guidance to tailor their national HIV prevention response so that they respond to the epidemic dynamics and social context of the country and populations who remain most vulnerable to and at risk of HIV infection. They have been developed in consultation with the UNAIDS cosponsors, international collaborating partners, government, civil society leaders and other experts. They build on Intensifying HIV Prevention: UNAIDS Policy Position Paper and the UNAIDS Action Plan on Intensifying HIV Prevention. In 2006, governments committed themselves to scaling up HIV prevention and treatment responses to ensure universal access by 2010. While in the past five years treatment access has expanded rapidly, the number of new HIV infections has not decreased - estimated at 4.3 (3.6-6.6) million in 2006 - with many people unable to access prevention services to prevent HIV infection. These Guidelines recognize that to sustain the advances in antiretroviral treatment and to ensure true universal access requires that prevention services be scaled up simultaneously with treatment. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    312466

    Preventing child maltreatment: a guide to taking action and generating evidence.

    Butchart A; Harvey AP; Mian M; Furniss T

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2006. [98] p.

    There is thus an increased awareness of the problem of child maltreatment and growing pressure on governments to take preventive action. At the same time, the paucity of evidence for the effectiveness of interventions raises concerns that scarce resources may be wasted through investment in well-intentioned but unsystematic prevention efforts whose effectiveness is unproven and which may never be proven. For this reason, the main aim of this guide is to provide technical advice for setting up policies and programmes for child maltreatment prevention and victim services that take into full account existing evidence on the effectiveness of interventions and that use the scientific principles of the public health approach. This will encourage the implementation of scientifically testable interventions and their evaluation. It is hoped that, in this way, the guide will contribute to a geographical expansion of the evidence base to include more evaluations of interventions from low-income and middle-income countries, and a greater variety of evaluated interventions. The long-term aim is to be able to prepare evidence-based guidelines on interventions for child maltreatment. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    282171

    Guidelines for the control of tuberculosis through DOTS strategy in Pacific Island countries.

    Blanc L; Ahn DI; Diletto C

    Manila, Philippines, World Health Organization [WHO], Regional Office for the Western Pacific, 1999. [43] p.

    Each of the small Pacific island countries has its own characteristics that need specific approaches in the implementation of DOTS strategy. The available tuberculosis guidelines are often too complex and too difficult to adapt. So health managers and health workers of these small countries need to have operational guidelines that are practical and simple to assist them in implementing an effective tuberculosis control programme based on the WHO recommended DOTS strategy. The main objectives of the guidelines are as follows: to guide tuberculosis programme managers in the implementation of DOTS strategy and the control of tuberculosis; to guide health workers and community leaders in identifying and referring suspect cases; and to guide health workers, patients and their families towards achieving a cure. As the guidelines are tested in a variety of different situations in the field, comments would be welcome and will help to improve future editions. Comments can be sent to WHO Regional Office for the Western Pacific, Tuberculosis Programme, Chronic Communicable Disease Unit. (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    282159

    Guidelines for implementing collaborative TB and HIV programme activities.

    Hargreaves N; Scano F

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], Stop TB Department, 2003. [84] p. (WHO/CDS/TB/2003.319; WHO/HIV/2003.01)

    The main aim of the guidelines is to enable the central units of national TB and HIV/AIDS programmes to support districts to plan, coordinate and implement collaborative TB/HIV activities. The guidelines are intended for countries with either an overlapping TB and HIV epidemic or where there is an increasing HIV rate which may fuel the TB epidemic. The WHO “Strategic Framework to Reduce the Burden of TB/HIV" provides the evidence base for these guidelines. The guidelines are designed to implement the interventions as described in this framework. The guidelines reflect lessons learned from TB/HIV field sites including ProTEST with experience from comprehensive TB/HIV health services and interventions. The guidelines are structured in line with the main theme of putting these interventions into action: what to implement, how to implement it and by whom. The health situation is urgent and requires a move away from small scale, often costly and time-limited pilot projects to phased implementation of collaborative TB/HIV activities. Phased implementation will build on experience learned form ProTEST pilot sites. Human and financial constraints make phased implementation necessary. (excerpt)
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  8. 8
    274990

    District guidelines for yellow fever surveillance.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Division of Emerging and Other Communicable Diseases Surveillance and Control; World Health Organization [WHO]. Expanded Programme on Immunization [EPI]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, Division of Emerging and Other Communicable Diseases Surveillance and Control, 1998. 59 p. (WHO/EPI/GEN/98.09)

    Yellow fever is a viral haemorrhagic fever transmitted by mosquitos infected with the yellow fever virus. The disease is untreatable, and case fatality rates in severe cases can exceed 50%. Yellow fever can be prevented through immunization with the 17D yellow fever vaccine. The vaccine is safe, inexpensive and reliable. A single dose provides protection against the disease for at least 10 years and possibly life-long. There is high risk for an explosive outbreak in an unimmunized population—and children are especially vulnerable—if even one laboratory-confirmed case of yellow fever occurs in the population. Effective activities for disease surveillance remain the best tool for prompt detection and response to an outbreak of yellow fever especially in populations where coverage rates for yellow fever vaccine are not high enough to provide protection against yellow fever. The guidelines in this manual describe how to detect and confirm suspected cases of yellow fever. They also describe how to respond to an outbreak of yellow fever and prevent additional cases from occurring. The guidelines are intended for use at the district level. (excerpt)
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  9. 9
    192307

    Guidelines for effective use of data from HIV surveillance systems.

    UNAIDS / WHO Working Group on Global HIV / AIDS / STI Surveillance; Family Health International [FHI]; World Health Organization [WHO]; European Commission; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2004. 60 p.

    By tracking the past course of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, warning of possible future spread and measuring changes in infection and behaviour over time, second- generation surveillance is designed to produce information that is useful in planning and evaluating HIV/AIDS prevention and care activities over time. This objective has been met in many countries, where useful, high-quality data are now available. Nevertheless, a gap remains between the collection of useful data and the actual use of these data to reduce people's exposure to HIV infection and to improve the lives of those infected. More effort has been put into improving the quality of data collection than into ensuring the appropriate use of data. Collecting high-quality data is an important prerequisite to using them well, but why are available data not used better? One reason is that surveillance systems are often fragmented. This means that many departments or groups are responsible for various aspects of data collection. Each considers its job done after it has held its own "dissemination workshop". No single entity is responsible for compiling all the data, analysing them and presenting them as a cohesive whole. Further, very few countries budget adequately for analysing, presenting and using data, either the financial or human resources. When financial resources are allocated, people often underestimate the skills and time required to use data well. Many surveillance officials responding to an informal WHO/UNAIDS survey gave one final reason: they simply do not know how to use the data. This is hardly surprising: most people responsible for surveillance systems are physicians and public health professionals who are good at interpreting trends in disease but who have limited training in the different ways HIV surveillance data can be used to improve programming, measure the success of prevention, lobby for policy change and engage affected communities in the response. This publication aims to provide guidance in these areas. It discusses the three major areas of data use: programme planning, programme monitoring and evaluation and advocacy, giving examples of how data can be used effectively in these contexts. The publication concentrates on the mechanics of using data: not just what can be done with data but how it can be done. How can data be packaged for different audiences? Who should be involved in dissemination? What makes a good press release? What steps are required to produce a national report? Practical guidance is given on how to develop interesting and persuasive presentations and how to present data effectively. Suggestions are made for bringing together programme planning and advocacy. Different countries have different epidemics, different surveillance systems and different data use needs. It is hoped, however, that all countries can find some general principles that will provide pointers on how to improve performance in areas of data use relevant to them. (excerpt)
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  10. 10
    104400

    Hookworm infection and anaemia: approaches to prevention and control.

    Pawlowski ZS; Schad GA; Stott GJ

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 1991. vi, 96 p.

    WHO published this manual on the prevention and control of hookworm infection and anemia primarily for community health workers. The manual addresses the epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of these conditions. Its annexes provide details of appropriate examination techniques for hookworm and hookworm anemia surveys and sample survey considerations. It emphasizes the importance of thorough population surveys. The worldwide prevalence of infection with Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus is about 25%. It occurs predominantly in developing countries, where prevalence may be as high as 80% in some areas. It is a major cause of iron deficiency anemia. Its presence indicates deficiencies in sanitation and health education. Many persons, including public health officials, are not interested in national control of hookworm infection, probably because it induces low mortality and it is technically difficult to measure and quantify hookworm-related morbidity. Control of hookworm infection and hookworm-related anemia is uncomplicated and effective. It consists of health education, effective sanitation, and treatment with antihelminthics and iron supplements. The manual's seven chapters cover the following: hookworms infecting humans; clinical pathology of hookworm infection; hookworm infection as a cause of anemia; epidemiology of hookworm infection; principles of prevention and control; assessing the situation; and practical prevention and control.
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