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Your search found 92 Results

  1. 1
    375395

    A tool for strengthening gender-sensitive national HIV and Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) monitoring and evaluation systems.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2016. 126 p.

    WHO and UNAIDS have released a new tool for strengthening gender-sensitive national HIV and sexual and reproductive health (SRH) monitoring and evaluation systems. The tool provides step-by-step guidance to strategic information specialists and monitoring and evaluation officers of HIV and SRH programmes on how to ask the right questions in order to uncover gender inequalities and their influence on health; identify and select gender-sensitive indicators; conduct gender-analysis of SRH and HIV data; and strengthen monitoring and evaluation systems to enable appropriate data collection and gender analysis. The tool has been used by nearly 30 country teams of strategic information specialists, civil society and HIV programme implementers to analyse their own SRH and HIV data from a gender equality perspective. It can be used for training monitoring and evaluation specialists as well as a resource guide for SRH and HIV programmes to develop gender profiles of their SRH and HIV situation. “Know your epidemic, know your response” has been the cornerstone of the HIV response. This tool supports this approach by helping identify inequities and underlying drivers and hence, improve evidence-informed SRH and HIV programmes for all, but particularly for women and girls.
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  2. 2
    375323

    WASH’Nutrition: A practical guidebook on increasing nutritional impact through integration of WASH and nutrition programmes for practitioners in humanitarian and developent contexts.

    Dodos J

    Paris, France, Action Contre la Faim [ACF], 2017. 156 p.

    Undernutrition is a multi-sectoral problem with multi-sectoral solutions. By applying integrated approaches, the impact, coherence and efficiency of the action can be improved. This operational guidebook demonstrates the importance of both supplementing nutrition programmes with WASH activities and adapting WASH interventions to include nutritional considerations i.e. making them more nutrition-sensitive and impactful on nutrition. It has been developed to provide practitioners with usable information and tools so that they can design and implement effective WASH and nutrition programmes. Apart from encouraging the design of new integrated projects, the guidebook provides support for reinforcing existing integrated interventions. It does not provide a standard approach or strict recommendations, but rather ideas, examples and practical tools on how to achieve nutrition and health gains with improved WASH. Integrating WASH and nutrition interventions will always have to be adapted to specific conditions, opportunities and constrains in each context. The guidebook primarily addresses field practitioners, WASH and Nutrition programme managers working in humanitarian and development contexts, and responds to the need for more practical guidance on WASH and nutrition integration at the field level. It can also be used as a practical tool for donors and institutions (such as ministries of health) to prioritise strategic activities and funding options. (Excerpt)
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  3. 3
    375167

    WHO recommendations on antenatal care for a positive pregnancy experience.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research; World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Nutrition for Health and Development; World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Maternal, Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2016. 172 p.

    The World Health Organization has released a new set of antenatal care (ANC) recommendations to improve maternal and perinatal health worldwide. The guidelines seek to reduce the global burden of stillbirths, reduce pregnancy complications and provide all women and adolescents with a positive pregnancy experience. High quality health care during pregnancy and childbirth can prevent deaths from pregnancy complications, perinatal deaths and stillbirths, yet globally, less than two-thirds of women receive antenatal care at least four times throughout their pregnancy. The new ANC model raises the recommended number of ANC visits from four to eight, thereby increasing the number of opportunities providers have to detect and address preventable complications related to pregnancy and childbirth. The guidelines provide 49 recommendations for routine and context-specific ANC visits, including nutritional interventions, maternal / fetal assessments, preventive measures, interventions for common physiological symptoms and health system interventions. Given that women around the world experience maternal care in a wide range of settings, the recommendations also outline several context-specific service delivery options, including midwife-led care, group care and community-based interventions.
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  4. 4
    358778

    WHO recommendations for the prevention and treatment of postpartum haemorrhage.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2012. 41 p.

    Postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) is a major cause of mortality, morbidity and long term disability related to pregnancy and childbirth. Effective interventions to prevent and treat PPH exist and can largely reduce the burden of this life-threatening condition. Given the availability of new scientific evidence related to the prevention and treatment of PPH, this document updates previous WHO recommendations and adds new recommendations for the prevention and treatment of PPH. The primary goal of this guideline is to provide a foundation for the implementation of interventions shown to have been effective in reducing the burden of PPH. Health professionals responsible for developing national and local health policies constitute the main target audience of this document. Obstetricians, midwives, general medical practitioners, health care managers and public health policy-makers, particularly in under-resourced settings are also targeted. This document establishes general principles of PPH care and it is intended to inform the development of clinical protocols and health policies related to PPH.
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  5. 5
    353472

    Practical guidelines for supporting EDUCAIDS implementation.

    Greenall M

    Paris, France, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization [UNESCO], 2012. 158 p.

    The education sector has a significant role to play in the response to HIV and AIDS. The sector can help to prevent the spread of HIV through education, and, in countries that are highly affected by HIV, by taking steps to protect itself from the effects of the epidemic. It can also make a significant contribution by supporting health improvement more generally and by helping to improve the sexual and reproductive health of young people in particular.This framework is designed to help those working in the education sector at a national level to understand the need for a robust response to HIV and AIDS in order to achieve Education for All (EFA) and the education-related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The document also highlights the education sector’s role in contributing to universal access to HIV and AIDS prevention, treatment, care and support.
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  6. 6
    333226

    Planning and implementing an essential package of sexual and reproductive health services: Guidance for integrating family planning and STI / RTI with other reproductive health and primary health services.

    Williams K; Warren C; Askew I

    [New York, New York], Population Council, 2010 Oct. [56] p.

    The goal of this guidance document is to provide a framework for developing an essential sexual and reproductive health (SRH) package. It focuses on two priority areas: 1) integrating family planning into maternal and newborn care services, and 2) integrating services for preventing and managing sexually transmitted infections / reproductive tract infections into primary healthcare services. This guidance document comprises three sections. The Introduction explains and justifies why the development and implementation of an essential SRH package should be planned and framed within the World Health Organization's six Building Blocks of Health Systems. The second section presents the "How To" steps and checklist tools for planning, implementing and scaling up, including specific examples for the two priority areas indicated above. The third section provides the evidence-base supporting the recommendations and action-points proposed in each tool. This evidence-base includes key findings and summary recommendations from a literature review (in matrix format) and a bibliography of the references included in the literature review.
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  7. 7
    332557

    WHO Technical Consultation on Postpartum and Postnatal Care.

    Matthews M; Severin VX; Jelka Z

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], Department of Making Pregnancy Safer, 2010. [65] p. (WHO/MPS/10.03)

    On October 29, 2008, WHO Technical Consultation on Postpartum and Postnatal Care was held in Geneva, Switzerland. This report reflects the discussions, proceedings and recommendations for follow-up. The World Health Organization (WHO) is in the process of revising and updating its guidance on postpartum and postnatal care delivered by skilled providers. The purposes of the revision are to encourage and support broader provision of care and to foster a new, woman-centred concept of care that promotes health and sustains attention to dangerous complications. This consultation report also discusses follow up activities after the revision of the WHO guidance.
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  8. 8
    344811
    Peer Reviewed

    Evidence behind the WHO guidelines: Hospital Care for Children: what is the aetiology and treatment of chronic diarrhoea in children with HIV?

    Ford A; Duke T; Campbell H

    Journal of Tropical Pediatrics. 2009 Dec; 55(6):349-55.

    This clinical review aims to address the issue of appropriate treatment for chronic diarrhea in children with HIV and evaluates the scientific evidence behind WHO's recommendations for this matter. It finds that highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) substantially reduces diarrhea, increases the effectiveness of antimicrobial agents, and improves weight gain.
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  9. 9
    342429
    Peer Reviewed

    Antiretroviral resistance patterns and HIV-1 subtype in mother-infant pairs after the administration of combination short-course zidovudine plus single-dose nevirapine for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV.

    Chalermchockcharoenkit A; Culnane M; Chotpitayasunondh T; Vanprapa N; Leelawiwat W; Mock PA; Asavapiriyanont S; Teeraratkul A; McConnell MS; McNicholl JM; Tappero JW

    Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2009 Jul 15; 49(2):299-305.

    BACKGROUND: World Health Organization guidelines for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) recommend administration of zidovudine and single-dose nevirapine (NVP) for HIV-1-infected women who are not receiving treatment for their own health or if complex regimens are not available. This study assessed antiretroviral resistance patterns among HIV-infected women and infants receiving single-dose NVP in Thailand, where the predominant circulating HIV-1 strains are CRF01_AE recombinants and where the minority are subtype B. METHODS: Venous blood samples were obtained from (1) HIV-infected women who received zidovudine from 34 weeks' gestation and single-dose NVP plus oral zidovudine during labor and (2) HIV-infected infants who received single-dose NVP after birth plus zidovudine for 4 weeks after delivery. HIV-1 drug resistance testing was performed using the TruGene assay (Bayer HealthCare). RESULTS: Most mothers and infants were infected with CRF01_AE. NVP resistance was detected in 34 (18%) of 190 women and 2 (20%) of 10 infants. There was a significantly higher proportion of NVP mutations in women with delivery viral loads of >50,000 copies/mL (adjusted odds ratio, 8.5; 95% confidence interval, 2.2-32.8, [Formula: see text] for linear trend) and in those with subtype B rather than CRF01_AE infections (38% vs. 16%; adjusted odds ratio, 3.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-11.8; P = .038). CONCLUSIONS: The lower frequency of NVP mutations among mothers infected with subtype CRF01_AE, compared with mothers infected with subtype B, suggests that individuals infected with subtype CRF01_AE may be less susceptible to the induction of NVP resistance than are individuals infected with subtype B.
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  10. 10
    328537

    Procuring Single-Use Injection Equipment and Safety Boxes: A Practical Guide for Pharmacists, Physicians, Procurement Staff and Programme Managers

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Health Technology and Pharmaceuticals, Department of Blood Safety and Clinical Technology

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2003 May 5. (WHO/BCT/03.04)

    The objective of this guide is to accompany pharmacists, physicians, procurement staff and programme managers through the process of procuring single-use injection equipment and safety boxes of assured quality, on a national or international market, at reasonable prices. International organizations have established standardized procurement procedures for medicines and medical devices. This guide describes how these procedures can be used to ensure the procurement of injection equipment and safety boxes. Institutions procuring injection equipment need to develop a list of manufacturers that are prequalified on the basis of certain criteria which include international quality standards. This guide provides steps and tools for procurement, including a pre-qualification procedure of injection equipment for purchase. Developing a monitoring system for supplier performance will improve and safeguard the quality of injection equipment selected and prevent or eliminate unreliable suppliers.
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  11. 11
    328042
    Peer Reviewed

    Global initiatives for improving hospital care for children: state of the art and future prospects.

    Campbell H; Duke T; Weber M; English M; Carai S; Tamburlini G

    Pediatrics. 2008 Apr; 121(4):e984-92.

    Deficiencies in the quality of health care are major limiting factors to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals for child and maternal health. Quality of patient care in hospitals is firmly on the agendas of Western countries but has been slower to gain traction in developing countries, despite evidence that there is substantial scope for improvement, that hospitals have a major role in child survival, and that inequities in quality may be as important as inequities in access. There is now substantial global experience of strategies and interventions that improve the quality of care for children in hospitals with limited resources. The World Health Organization has developed a toolkit that contains adaptable instruments, including a framework for quality improvement, evidence-based clinical guidelines in the form of the Pocket Book of Hospital Care for Children, teaching material, assessment, and mortality audit tools. These tools have been field-tested by doctors, nurses, and other child health workers in many developing countries. This collective experience was brought together in a global World Health Organization meeting in Bali in 2007. This article describes how many countries are achieving improvements in quality of pediatric care, despite limited resources and other major obstacles, and how the evidence has progressed in recent years from documenting the nature and scope of the problems to describing the effectiveness of innovative interventions. The challenges remain to bring these and other strategies to scale and to support research into their use, impact, and sustainability in different environments.
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  12. 12
    328129

    [Family planning: a global handbook for providers. Evidence-based guidance developed through worldwide collaboration]

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research; Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Center for Communication Programs. Information and Knowledge for Optimal Health [INFO]

    Baltimore, Maryland, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Center for Communication Programs, 2008. [489] p. (WHO Family Planning Cornerstone)

    This new handbook on family planning methods and related topics is the first of its kind. Through an organized, collaborative process, experts from around the world have come to consensus on practical guidance that reflects the best available scientific evidence. The World Health Organization (WHO) convened this process. Many major technical assistance and professional organizations have endorsed and adopted this guidance. This book serves as a quick-reference resource for all levels of health care workers. It is the successor to The Essentials of Contraceptive Technology, first published in 1997 by the Center for Communication Programs at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. In format and organization it resembles the earlier handbook. At the same time, all of the content of Essentials has been re-examined, new evidence has been gathered, guidance has been revised where needed, and gaps have been filled. This handbook reflects the family planning guidance developed by WHO. Also, this book expands on the coverage of Essentials: It addresses briefly other needs of clients that come up in the course of providing family planning. (excerpt)
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  13. 13
    326029

    Implementation process review of the "Training of Teachers Manual on Preventive Education against HIV / AIDS in the School Setting".

    Girault P

    [Paris, France], UNESCO, Internal Oversight Service, Evaluation Section, 2003 Aug. 50 p. (IOS/EVS/PI/33)

    At a recent review workshop in Uzbekistan and elsewhere concerns have been raised that the manual is too strictly focused on transferring biomedical knowledge and does not pay enough attention to reducing vulnerability to HIV/AIDS by promoting lifeskills. It is also believed that the HIV information in the manual needs to be updated, and that the inclusion of teaching of more participatory training techniques could be considered. In addition, in some countries, a strict focus on HIV/AIDS is not realistic - embedding HIV/AIDS in a wider school-health approach should be considered. Before expanding to other countries, UNESCO decided then to do a review of the progress implementation of the "Preventive Education against HIV/AIDS in the School Setting" project and a review of the manual. The particular interest of this review is to look at the way that the project was implemented and to review the manual based on the comments generated by the targeted countries. Its overall aim is to generate recommendations both on the content of the manual and the implementation process, before expanding to other countries covered by UNESCO Bangkok. (excerpt)
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  14. 14
    323078

    [Family planning: a global handbook for providers. Evidence-based guidance developed through worldwide collaboration] Planificacion familiar: un manual mundial para proveedores. Orientacion basada en la evidencia desarrollada gracias a la colaboracion mundial.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research; Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Center for Communication Programs. Information and Knowledge for Optimal Health [INFO]

    Baltimore, Maryland, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Center for Communication Programs, 2007. [383] p. (WHO Family Planning Cornerstone)

    This new handbook on family planning methods and related topics is the first of its kind. Through an organized, collaborative process, experts from around the world have come to consensus on practical guidance that reflects the best available scientific evidence. The World Health Organization (WHO) convened this process. Many major technical assistance and professional organizations have endorsed and adopted this guidance. This book serves as a quick-reference resource for all levels of health care workers. It is the successor to The Essentials of Contraceptive Technology, first published in 1997 by the Center for Communication Programs at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. In format and organization it resembles the earlier handbook. At the same time, all of the content of Essentials has been re-examined, new evidence has been gathered, guidance has been revised where needed, and gaps have been filled. This handbook reflects the family planning guidance developed by WHO. Also, this book addresses briefly other needs of clients that come up in the course of providing family planning. (excerpt)
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  15. 15
    322021

    Handbook of supply management at first-level health care facilities. 1st version for country adaptation.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2006. 73 p. (WHO/HIV/2006.03)

    All first-level health care facilities, namely primary health care clinics and outpatient departments based in district hospitals, use medicines and related supplies. It takes a team effort to manage these supplies, involving all health care facility staff: doctors, nurses, health workers and storekeepers. This is especially true in small facilities with only one or two health workers. Each staff member should know how to manage all supplies at the health care facility correctly. Each staff member has an important role. The Handbook of Supply Management at First-Level Health Care Facilities describes all major medicines and supply management tasks, known as the standard procedures of medicines supply management at first-level health care facilities. Each chapter covers one major task, explains how the task fits into the process of maintaining a consistent supply of medicines, and recommends which standard procedures to use. Annexes at the back of the handbook contain various checklists and examples of forms which can be introduced as needed at your health care facility. This handbook is part of a package used in an integrated training and capacity-building course targeted at first-level health care facilities. It can be used in conjunction with the existing Integrated Management of Adult and Adolescent Illness (IMAI) strategy developed by WHO. It can also be used for basic training activities independent of IMAI training courses. (excerpt)
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  16. 16
    321122

    Engaging faith-based organizations in HIV prevention. A training manual for programme managers.

    Toure A; Melek M; Jato M; Kane M; Kajungu R

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 2007. [53] p.

    The influence behind faith-based organizations is not difficult to discern. In many developing countries, FBOs not only provide spiritual guidance to their followers; they are often the primary providers for a variety of local health and social services. Situated within communities and building on relationships of trust, these organizations have the ability to influence the attitudes and behaviours of their fellow community members. Moreover, they are in close and regular contact with all age groups in society and their word is respected. In fact, in some traditional communities, religious leaders are often more influential than local government officials or secular community leaders. Many of the case studies researched for the UNFPA publication Culture Matters showed that the involvement of faith-based organizations in UNFPA-supported projects enhanced negotiations with governments and civil society on culturally sensitive issues. Gradually, these experiences are being shared across countries andacross regions, which has facilitated interfaith dialogue on the most effective approaches to prevent the spread of HIV. Such dialogue has also helped convince various faith-based organizations that joining together as a united front is the most effective way to fight the spread of HIV and lessen the impact of AIDS. This manual is a capacity-building tool to help policy makers and programmers identify, design and follow up on HIV prevention programmes undertaken by FBOs. The manual can also be used by development practitioners partnering with FBOs to increase their understanding of the role of FBOs in HIV prevention, and to design plans for partnering with FBOs to halt the spread of the virus. (excerpt)
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  17. 17
    320921

    Consultation on Indicators for the Right to Health, Chateau de Penthes, Geneva, 1-2 April 2004. Meeting report.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Ethics, Trade, Human Rights and Health Law

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, Department of Ethics, Trade, Human Rights and Health Law, 2004 Dec. 18 p.

    This document provides an overview of the presentations and discussions on the issue of right to health indicators from a workshop held 1-2 April 2004. Part A (Background and rationale) explains the origins and aims of the concept of right to health indicators, as well as the ultimate objective of this series of consultations. Part B (Proposed frameworks and related concepts/initiatives) describes the framework proposed by the UN Special Rapporteur on the right to health (Paul Hunt) on right to health indicators. Part C (Related conceptual frameworks to human rights) provides an overview of two presentations on (1) the Commission on Human Security's work on human security and the social minimum and (2) WHO's work on Millennium Development Goals and equity. Part D (Work in progress and mapping exercises) contains summaries of a number of presentations relating to ongoing work relevant to right to health indicators. Part E (Conclusions) list ways forward and activities to be completed before the next meeting (tentatively planned for June 2005). (author's)
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  18. 18
    320919

    Integrating gender issues into HIV / AIDS programs: an operational guide.

    Ofosu-Amaah AW; Oppong MY

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, Gender and Development Group, 2004 Nov. [43] p.

    This Operational Guide provides specific guidance to national HIV/AIDS program management teams, public-sector ministries, private sector entities, and non-governmental and community-based organizations (NGOs/CBOs) implementing World Bank-financed HIV/AIDS programs and projects, as well as the World Bank's operational staff who design these programs and projects. It provides concrete examples of the integration of gender concerns into all stages of project preparation, implementation, monitoring and evaluation (M&E). The immediate objective is to provide the tools needed to identify and analyze gender-specific issues and concerns in HIV/AIDS programs and make appropriate provisions in HIV/AIDS operations to address these concerns. The ultimate goal of this Operational Guide is to enhance the effectiveness of HIV/AIDS interventions by ensuring that the gender inequalities that underlie the epidemic are addressed. (excerpt)
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  19. 19
    320235

    Making commitments matter: a toolkit for young people to evaluate national youth policy.

    United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs

    New York, New York, United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, [2003]. [113] p.

    This Toolkit is meant for national youth organizations and/or representatives working with youth. It can be used as a tool to: Assess your country's progress in reaching the WPAY goals; Prioritize your organization's work, based on your findings; Initiate actions at the national level. This Toolkit should be used as a starting point for determining what your government, and civil society, has done to better the lives of young people, since 1995. In addition to providing methods for evaluating this progress, the Toolkit also contains concrete tools to further your youth work. As such, we hope that you will find it both informative and useful, and a good resource for your organization. (excerpt)
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  20. 20
    319319

    Coordinated strategy to abandon female genital mutilation / cutting in one generation: a human rights-based approach to programming. Leveraging social dynamics for collective change.

    Gillespie G; De Vita MG

    New York, New York, UNICEF, 2007. [53] p. (Technical Note)

    The coordinated strategy presented in this technical note describes a human rights-based approach to female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) programming. The note aims to provide guidance to programmers who are supporting large-scale abandonment of FGM/C in Egypt, Sudan and countries in sub-Saharan Africa. To provide a more comprehensive understanding of FGM/C as a social convention, this coordinated strategy includes an in-depth examination of the research documented by the UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre in 'Changing a Harmful Social Convention: Female genital mutilation/cutting', Innocenti Digest. Its focus is limited to the social dynamics of the practice at the community level, and it applies game theory, the science of interdependent decision-making, to the social dynamics of FGM/C. This strategy does not cover everything that occurs at the community level, but rather, looks at the practice from the perspective of a particular type of social convention described by Thomas C. Schelling in The Strategy of Conflict. It introduces an innovative approach to FGM/C programming that is intended to bring about lasting social change. (excerpt)
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  21. 21
    318280

    Human papillomavirus and HPV vaccines: technical information for policy-makers and health professionals.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Immunization, Vaccines and Biologicals. Initiative for Vaccine Research

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2007. 36 p. (WHO/IVB/07.05)

    Cervical cancer is the most common cancer affecting women in developing countries. It has been estimated to have been responsible for almost 260 000 deaths in 2005, of which about 80% occurred in developing countries. Cervical cancer is caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). Recently a vaccine that has the potential to prevent certain HPV infections, and hence reduce the incidence of cervical cancer and other anogenital cancers, has been licensed. Another vaccine is in advanced clinical testing. This document provides key information on HPV, HPV-related diseases and HPV vaccines, and is intended to underpin the guidance note on HPV vaccine introduction, recently produced by WHO and the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA). HPV are DNA viruses that infect skin or mucosal cells. There are more than 100 known HPV genotypes, at least 13 of which can cause cancer of the cervix and are associated with other anogenital cancers and cancers of the head and neck; they are called "high-risk" genotypes. The two most common of these (genotypes 16 and 18) cause approximately 70% of all cervical cancers. HPV (especially genotypes 6 and 11) can also cause genital warts, a common benign condition of the external genitalia that causes significant morbidity. HPV is highly transmissible, with peak incidence of infection soon after the beginning of sexual activity. Most people acquire the infection at some time in their life. Factors contributing to development of cervical cancer after HPV infection include immune suppression, multiparity, early age at first delivery, cigarette smoking, long-term use of hormonal contraceptives, and co-infection with Chlamydia trachomatis or Herpes simplex virus. (excerpt)
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  22. 22
    318273

    Women, ageing and health: a framework for action. Focus on gender.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Gender, Women and Health

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2007. 55 p.

    The concepts and principles in this document build on the World Health Organization's active ageing policy framework, which calls on policy-makers, practitioners, nongovernmental organizations and civil society to optimize opportunities for health, participation and security in order to enhance quality of life for people as they age. This requires a comprehensive approach that takes into account the gendered nature of the life course. This report endeavors to provide information on ageing women in both developing and developed countries; however, data is often scant in many areas of the developing world. Some implications and directions for policy and practice based on the evidence and known best practices are included in this report. These are intended to stimulate discussion and lead to specific recommendations and action plans. The report provides an overall framework for taking action that is useful in all settings. Specific responses in policy, practice and research is undoubtedly best left to policy-makers, experts and older people in individual countries and regions, since they best understand the political, economic and social context within which decisions must be made. (excerpt)
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  23. 23
    318272

    Human rights-based programming: what it is.

    Melo LA; Toure A; Angarita A; Heckadon S; Rasul Z

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 2006 Dec. [37] p.

    A human rights-based approach to programming is a conceptual framework and methodological tool for ensuring that human rights principles are reflected in policies and national development frameworks. Human rights are the minimum standards that people require to live in freedom and dignity. They are based on the principles of universality, indivisibility, interdependence, equality and non-discrimination. Through the systematic use of human rights-based programming, UNFPA seeks to empower people to exercise their rights, especially their reproductive rights, and to live free from gender-based violence. It does this by supporting programmes aimed at giving women, men and young people ('rights holders') the information, life skills and education they need to claim their rights. It also contributes to capacity-building among public officials, teachers, health-care workers and others who have a responsibility to fulfill these rights ('duty bearers'). In addition, UNFPA strengthens civil society organizations, which often serve as intermediaries between governments and individuals, and promotes mechanisms by which duty bearers can be held accountable. (excerpt)
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  24. 24
    316012

    Integrated management of childhood illness: An emphasis on the management of infectious diseases.

    Benguigui Y; Stein F

    Seminars in Pediatric Infectious Diseases. 2006 Apr; 17(2):80-98.

    The Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) strategy has helped strengthen the application and expand coverage of key child survival interventions aimed at preventing deaths from infectious disease, respiratory illness, and malnutrition, whether at the health services, in the community, or at home. IMCI covers the prevention, treatment, and follow-up of the leading causes of mortality, which are responsible for at least two-thirds of deaths of children younger than 5 years in the countries of the Americas. The IMCI clinical guidelines take an evidence-based, syndrome approach to case management that supports the rational, effective, and affordable use of drugs and diagnostic tools. When clinical resources are limited, the syndrome approach is a more realistic and cost-effective way to manage patients. Careful and systematic assessment of common symptoms and well-selected clinical signs provide sufficient information to guide effective actions. (author's)
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  25. 25
    315305

    Integrated Management of Childhood Illness: complementary course on HIV / AIDS.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Child and Adolescent Health and Development; UNICEF

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2006. [393] p.

    Even though children living with HIV/AIDS respond very well to treatment with antiretroviral therapy (ART), to date few children living with HIV/AIDS have access to ART mostly due to a lack of cheap feasible diagnostic tests for infants, lack of affordable child-friendly ARV drugs and lack of trained health personnel. This course aims to address the issue of lack of trained personnel. With an ever increasing burden of HIV and a high percentage of children infected, health workers urgently require accurate, up to date training and information on assessment and management of HIV in children. The IMCI complementary course on HIV is designed to assist health workers to assess, classify, treat and follow up HIV exposed infants and children, to identify the role of family and community in caring for the child with HIV/AIDS and also to enhance health workers' skills in counseling of caretakers around HIV/AIDS. (excerpt)
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