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Your search found 8 Results

  1. 1
    374222

    Quality of care in contraceptive information and services, based on human rights standards: a checklist for health care providers.

    Kiarie J; Khosla R; Ali M; Cottingham J

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2017. 32 p.

    Unmet need for contraception remains high in many settings, and is highest among the most vulnerable in society: adolescents, the poor, those living in rural areas and urban slums, people living with HIV, and internally displaced people. The latest estimates are that 225 million women have an unmet need for modern contraception, and the need is greatest where the risks of maternal mortality are highest. There is increasing recognition that promotion and protection of human rights in contraceptive services and programs is critical to addressing this challenge. However, despite these efforts, human rights are often not explicitly integrated into the design, implementation and monitoring of services. A key challenge is how to best support health care providers and facility managers at the point of service delivery, often in low-resource real-world settings, to ensure their use of human rights aspects in provision of contraceptive services. The point of service delivery is the most direct point of contact where potential violations/omissions of rights come into play and requires special attention. This checklist covers five areas of competence needed by health care providers to provide quality of care in contraceptive information and services including: respecting users’ privacy and guaranteeing confidentiality, choice, accessible and acceptable services, involvement of users in improving services and fostering continuity of care and follow-up. International and regional human rights treaties, national constitutions and laws provide guarantees specifically relating to access to contraceptive information, commodities and services. In addition, over the past few decades, international, regional and national legislative and human rights bodies have increasingly applied human rights to contraceptive information and services. They recommend, among other actions, that states should ensure timely and affordable access to good quality sexual and reproductive health information and services, including contraception, which should be delivered in a way that ensures fully informed decision making, respects dignity, autonomy, privacy and confidentiality, and is sensitive to individuals’ needs and perspectives. This document presents a user friendly checklist specifically addressed to health care providers, at the primary health care level, who are involved in the direct provision of contraceptive information and services. It is complimentary to WHO guidelines on Ensuring human rights in the provision of contraceptive information and services: Guidance and recommendations, and the Implementation Guide published jointly with UNFPA in 2015. This checklist also builds on WHO vision document on Standards for Improving Quality of Care for Maternal and Newborn Care and its ongoing work under the Quality, Equity and Dignity initiative. The checklist should be read along with other guidance from WHO and also from partners.
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  2. 2
    328129

    [Family planning: a global handbook for providers. Evidence-based guidance developed through worldwide collaboration]

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research; Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Center for Communication Programs. Information and Knowledge for Optimal Health [INFO]

    Baltimore, Maryland, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Center for Communication Programs, 2008. [489] p. (WHO Family Planning Cornerstone)

    This new handbook on family planning methods and related topics is the first of its kind. Through an organized, collaborative process, experts from around the world have come to consensus on practical guidance that reflects the best available scientific evidence. The World Health Organization (WHO) convened this process. Many major technical assistance and professional organizations have endorsed and adopted this guidance. This book serves as a quick-reference resource for all levels of health care workers. It is the successor to The Essentials of Contraceptive Technology, first published in 1997 by the Center for Communication Programs at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. In format and organization it resembles the earlier handbook. At the same time, all of the content of Essentials has been re-examined, new evidence has been gathered, guidance has been revised where needed, and gaps have been filled. This handbook reflects the family planning guidance developed by WHO. Also, this book expands on the coverage of Essentials: It addresses briefly other needs of clients that come up in the course of providing family planning. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    323078

    [Family planning: a global handbook for providers. Evidence-based guidance developed through worldwide collaboration] Planificacion familiar: un manual mundial para proveedores. Orientacion basada en la evidencia desarrollada gracias a la colaboracion mundial.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research; Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Center for Communication Programs. Information and Knowledge for Optimal Health [INFO]

    Baltimore, Maryland, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Center for Communication Programs, 2007. [383] p. (WHO Family Planning Cornerstone)

    This new handbook on family planning methods and related topics is the first of its kind. Through an organized, collaborative process, experts from around the world have come to consensus on practical guidance that reflects the best available scientific evidence. The World Health Organization (WHO) convened this process. Many major technical assistance and professional organizations have endorsed and adopted this guidance. This book serves as a quick-reference resource for all levels of health care workers. It is the successor to The Essentials of Contraceptive Technology, first published in 1997 by the Center for Communication Programs at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. In format and organization it resembles the earlier handbook. At the same time, all of the content of Essentials has been re-examined, new evidence has been gathered, guidance has been revised where needed, and gaps have been filled. This handbook reflects the family planning guidance developed by WHO. Also, this book addresses briefly other needs of clients that come up in the course of providing family planning. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    308491

    Improving access to quality care in family planning: WHO's four cornerstones of evidence-based guidance.

    Wu SC; Zou Y; Church K; Meirik O

    Journal of Reproduction and Contraception. 2007 Jun; 18(2):63-71.

    The four cornerstones of guidance in technique service of family planning are established by WHO based on high quality evidences. They have been updated according to the appearing new evidences, and the consensuses were reached by the international experts in this field. The four documents include Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use, Selected Practice Recommendations for Contraceptive Use, Decision-making Tool for Family Planning Clients and Providers and The Global Handbook for Family Planning Providers. The first two documents mainly face to the policy-makers and programme managers and were treated as the important references for creating the local guideline. The other two documents were developed for the front-line health-care and family planning providers at different levels, which include plenty of essential technical information to help providers improve their ability in service delivery and counselling. China paid great attention to the introduction and application of WHO guidelines. As soon as the newer editions of these documents were available, the Chinese version would be followed. WHO guidelines have been primarily adapted with the newly issued national guideline, The Clinical Practical Skill Guidelines- Family Planning Part, which was established by China Medical Association. At the same time, the WHO guidelines have been introduced to some of the clinicians and family planning providers at different levels. In the future, more special training courses will be introduced to the township level based on the needs of grass-root providers. (author's)
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  5. 5
    315301

    Family planning: a global handbook for providers. Evidence-based guidance developed through worldwide collaboration.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research; Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Center for Communication Programs. Information and Knowledge for Optimal Health [INFO]

    Baltimore, Maryland, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Center for Communication Programs, 2007. [383] p. (WHO Family Planning Cornerstone)

    This new handbook on family planning methods and related topics is the first of its kind. Through an organized, collaborative process, experts from around the world have come to consensus on practical guidance that reflects the best available scientific evidence. The World Health Organization (WHO) convened this process. Many major technical assistance and professional organizations have endorsed and adopted this guidance. This book serves as a quick-reference resource for all levels of health care workers. It is the successor to The Essentials of Contraceptive Technology, first published in 1997 by the Center for Communication Programs at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. In format and organization it resembles the earlier handbook. At the same time, all of the content of Essentials has been re-examined, new evidence has been gathered, guidance has been revised where needed, and gaps have been filled. This handbook reflects the family planning guidance developed by WHO. Also, this book expands on the coverage of Essentials: It addresses briefly other needs of clients that come up in the course of providing family planning. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    136037

    Family planning handbook for health professionals. The sexual and reproductive health approach.

    Evans I; Huezo C

    London, England, International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF], 1997. viii, 379 p. (IPPF Medical Publications)

    The "Family Planning Handbook for Health Professionals" is based on the concepts of sexual and reproductive health. It replaces the "Family Planning Handbook for Doctors" (1988) by emphasizing the role of a team of professionals, including medical doctors, nurses, midwives, and counselors. In addition to covering available contraceptive methods, the handbook includes chapters on infertility, sexually transmitted diseases, routine reproductive health screening, and cervical cytology. It is intended for use by health care professionals in association with IPPF's "Medical and Service Delivery Guidelines," but offers more in-depth explanations of the background, techniques, and methods.
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  7. 7
    136038

    Medical and service delivery guidelines for family planning. 2nd ed., 1997.

    Huezo CM; Carignan CS

    London, England, International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF], 1997. xxii, 298 p. (IPPF Medical Publications)

    Consistent with the framework adopted at the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development, this second edition of "Medical and Service Delivery Guidelines for Family Planning" emphasizes the reproductive health needs of couples rather than family planning (FP) program targets. The focus of the guidelines is on providing services that reach essential standards of quality and are scientifically, socially, and operationally sound. They can be utilized as a guide for the delivery of FP services, a reference document for assessing quality of care, an outline for pre-service and in-service training, and as a tool for supervisors. In addition to updating information on specific contraceptive methods, this second edition includes new chapters on emergency contraception, pregnancy diagnosis, reproductive tract infections and STDs, and infection prevention and control. Intended users include program planners and users, as well as clinical and community-based services providers, trainers, and supervisors.
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  8. 8
    069524

    Caribbean family planning guide: a self-instructional manual for health professionals.

    Parris OE; Lee Poy PI; Kopp Z

    New York, New York, International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region, 1990. xiii, 431 p.

    This is the 1st instruction manual dealing with the delivery of family planning services in the Caribbean. It will be of great value to nursing and medical students, clinicians, and other allied health care professionals. Most of the contributors came from the West Indies because of their wealth of knowledge and experience in the practice of family planning in the region. The material has been crystallized into clear steps to help beginners and quick, accurate references for those already in the field. Each chapter has a pretest in the beginning and a posttest at the end to help with selfanalysis. The subject matter ranges from contraceptive technology, family planning as a human right to dealing with sexual molestation, HIV infection, mental and physical handicaps, and teenage pregnancy. Students will find useful information about the rationale and significance of family planning, its history, and essential skills like counseling and communication, in depth information on each type of contraceptive is also included. There is a list of recommended activities encouraging the application of learning to real-life situations. And there is a section of recommended references for further study. The material in this manual is designed to be appropriate for Caribbean health professionals, but can also be used in countries of similar economic development as well as more developed nations.
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