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Your search found 8 Results

  1. 1
    339653

    Rapid advice: antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection in adults and adolescents.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of HIV / AIDS

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2009 Nov. 25 p.

    Based on the latest scientific evidence, the World Health Organization (WHO) has released new recommendations on HIV treatment and prevention and infant feeding in the context of HIV. WHO now recommends earlier initiation of antiretroviral therapy for adults and adolescents, the delivery of more patient-friendly antiretroviral drugs (ARVs), and prolonged use of ARVs to reduce the risk of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. For the first time, WHO recommends that HIV-positive mothers or their infants take ARVs while breastfeeding to prevent HIV transmission.
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  2. 2
    344811
    Peer Reviewed

    Evidence behind the WHO guidelines: Hospital Care for Children: what is the aetiology and treatment of chronic diarrhoea in children with HIV?

    Ford A; Duke T; Campbell H

    Journal of Tropical Pediatrics. 2009 Dec; 55(6):349-55.

    This clinical review aims to address the issue of appropriate treatment for chronic diarrhea in children with HIV and evaluates the scientific evidence behind WHO's recommendations for this matter. It finds that highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) substantially reduces diarrhea, increases the effectiveness of antimicrobial agents, and improves weight gain.
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  3. 3
    342429
    Peer Reviewed

    Antiretroviral resistance patterns and HIV-1 subtype in mother-infant pairs after the administration of combination short-course zidovudine plus single-dose nevirapine for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV.

    Chalermchockcharoenkit A; Culnane M; Chotpitayasunondh T; Vanprapa N; Leelawiwat W; Mock PA; Asavapiriyanont S; Teeraratkul A; McConnell MS; McNicholl JM; Tappero JW

    Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2009 Jul 15; 49(2):299-305.

    BACKGROUND: World Health Organization guidelines for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) recommend administration of zidovudine and single-dose nevirapine (NVP) for HIV-1-infected women who are not receiving treatment for their own health or if complex regimens are not available. This study assessed antiretroviral resistance patterns among HIV-infected women and infants receiving single-dose NVP in Thailand, where the predominant circulating HIV-1 strains are CRF01_AE recombinants and where the minority are subtype B. METHODS: Venous blood samples were obtained from (1) HIV-infected women who received zidovudine from 34 weeks' gestation and single-dose NVP plus oral zidovudine during labor and (2) HIV-infected infants who received single-dose NVP after birth plus zidovudine for 4 weeks after delivery. HIV-1 drug resistance testing was performed using the TruGene assay (Bayer HealthCare). RESULTS: Most mothers and infants were infected with CRF01_AE. NVP resistance was detected in 34 (18%) of 190 women and 2 (20%) of 10 infants. There was a significantly higher proportion of NVP mutations in women with delivery viral loads of >50,000 copies/mL (adjusted odds ratio, 8.5; 95% confidence interval, 2.2-32.8, [Formula: see text] for linear trend) and in those with subtype B rather than CRF01_AE infections (38% vs. 16%; adjusted odds ratio, 3.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-11.8; P = .038). CONCLUSIONS: The lower frequency of NVP mutations among mothers infected with subtype CRF01_AE, compared with mothers infected with subtype B, suggests that individuals infected with subtype CRF01_AE may be less susceptible to the induction of NVP resistance than are individuals infected with subtype B.
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  4. 4
    322021

    Handbook of supply management at first-level health care facilities. 1st version for country adaptation.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2006. 73 p. (WHO/HIV/2006.03)

    All first-level health care facilities, namely primary health care clinics and outpatient departments based in district hospitals, use medicines and related supplies. It takes a team effort to manage these supplies, involving all health care facility staff: doctors, nurses, health workers and storekeepers. This is especially true in small facilities with only one or two health workers. Each staff member should know how to manage all supplies at the health care facility correctly. Each staff member has an important role. The Handbook of Supply Management at First-Level Health Care Facilities describes all major medicines and supply management tasks, known as the standard procedures of medicines supply management at first-level health care facilities. Each chapter covers one major task, explains how the task fits into the process of maintaining a consistent supply of medicines, and recommends which standard procedures to use. Annexes at the back of the handbook contain various checklists and examples of forms which can be introduced as needed at your health care facility. This handbook is part of a package used in an integrated training and capacity-building course targeted at first-level health care facilities. It can be used in conjunction with the existing Integrated Management of Adult and Adolescent Illness (IMAI) strategy developed by WHO. It can also be used for basic training activities independent of IMAI training courses. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    288905

    Interim patient monitoring guidelines for HIV care and ART. Based on the WHO HIV Patient ART Monitoring Meeting, held at WHO / HQ, Geneva, Switzerland, from 29-31 March 2004. (March 2005 update of 6th August 2004 draft).

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2005 Mar. 191 p.

    These guidelines have been provided by the World Health Organization (WHO) and other international partners in order to: 1. Facilitate national stakeholder consensus on a minimum, standardized set of data elements to be included in patient monitoring tools; 2. Aid in the development of an effective national HIV care/ART patient monitoring system; 3. Enable the rapid scale-up of effective chronic HIV care, ART and prevention; and 4. Contribute to effective programme monitoring and global reporting and planning through the measurement of district-, national- and international-level indicators. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    192146

    Guidelines for surveillance of HIV drug resistance. Draft.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2003. 79 p.

    The purposes of the HDRST include: 1) to work with the National AIDS Committee to consider the specific public health uses of HIV drug resistance surveillance in the country, and to assess feasibility of surveillance; 2) to develop an appropriate time line for resistance surveillance activities, in coordination with other important implementation plans such as expanding HIV treatment; 3) to assess the country's capacity for HIV drug resistance surveillance, to decide on the populations and groups to be targeted, and to identify additional resources and activities needed; 4) to perform HIV drug resistance threshold surveys to assess when the frequency of resistance in persons newly diagnosed with HIV has reached the 5% threshold indicating a need for resistance surveillance; 5) to implement, when appropriate, HIV drug resistance surveillance; 6) to collaborate with the National AIDS Committee and the national treatment programme; to explore the feasibility of treatment programme monitoring by adding a resistance monitoring component to other year-end programme monitoring activities; 7) after routine surveillance is established, to consider implementing other special studies for in-depth evaluation of certain aspects of drug resistance within the country; 8) to insure implementation of all activities in accordance with international ethical standards designed to promote the well- being and health of individuals and communities; 9) to insure the dissemination of results in order to promote and support the public health of the country. (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    273362

    Antiretroviral drugs for treating pregnant women and preventing HIV infection in infants: guidelines on care, treatment and support for women living with HIV / AIDS and their children in resource-constrained settings.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2004. v, 49 p.

    Mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) is the most important source of HIV infection in children. In 2001, the United Nations General Assembly Special Session on HIV/AIDS committed countries to reduce the proportion of infants infected with HIV by 20% by 2005 and by 50% by 2010. Achieving this urgently requires an increase in access to integrated and comprehensive programmes to prevent HIV infection in infants and young children. Such programmes consist of interventions focusing on primary prevention of HIV infection among women and their partners; prevention of unintended pregnancies among HIV-infected women; prevention of HIV transmission from HIV-infected women to their children; and the provision of treatment, care and support for women living with HIV/AIDS, their children and families. WHO convened a Technical Consultation on Antiretroviral Drugs and the Prevention of Mother-to-child Transmission of HIV Infection in Resource-limited Settings in Geneva, Switzerland on 5–6 February 2004. Scientists, policymakers, programme managers and community representatives reviewed the most recent experience with programmes and evidence on the safety and efficacy of various antiretroviral (ARV) regimens for preventing HIV infection in infants. This information was reviewed in the context of the rapid expansion of ARV treatment in resource-constrained settings using standardized and simplified drug regimens. Prior to the Technical Consultation, a draft set of recommendations had been issued for public comment. (excerpt)
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  8. 8
    191883
    Peer Reviewed

    Can highly active antiretroviral therapy reduce the spread of HIV? A study in a township of South Africa.

    Auvert B; Males S; Puren A; Taljaard D; Caraël M

    Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes. 2004 Mar 1; 36(1):613-621.

    To estimate the proportion of people eligible for combination antiretroviral therapy and to evaluate the potential impact of providing HAART on the spread of HIV-1 under World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines in a South African township with a high prevalence of HIV-1. A community-based cross-sectional study in a township near Johannesburg, South Africa, of a random sample of approximately 1000 men and women aged 15 to 49 years. Background characteristics and sexual behavior were recorded by questionnaire. Participants were tested for HIV-1, and their CD4+ cell counts and plasma HIV-1 RNA loads were measured. The proportion of people whose CD4+ cell count was less than 200 cells/mm/3 and who would be eligible to receive HAART under WHO guidelines was estimated. The potential impact of antiretroviral drugs on the spread of HIV-1 in this setting was determined by estimating among the partnerships engaged in by HIV-1–positive individuals the proportion of spousal and nonspousal partnerships eligible to receive HAART and then by calculating the potential impact of HAART on the annual risk of HIV-1 transmission due to sexual contacts with HIV-1–infected persons. The results were compared with those obtained using United States Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS) guidelines. The overall prevalence of HIV-1 infection was 21.8% (19.2%–24.6%), and of these people, 9.5% (6.1%–14.9%) or 2.1% (1.3%–3.3%) of all those aged 15 to 49 years would be eligible for HAART (ranges are 95% confidence limits). In each of the next years 6.3% (4.6%–8.4%) of those currently infected with HIV-1 need to start HAART. Among the partnerships in which individuals were HIV-1–positive, only a small proportion of spousal partnerships (7.6% [3.4%–15.6%]) and nonspousal partnerships (5.7%, [3.0% 10.2%]) involved a partner with a CD4+ cell count below 200 cells/mm3 and would have benefited from the reduction of transmission due to the decrease in plasma HIV-1 RNA load under HAART. Estimates of the impact of HAART on the annual risk of HIV-1 transmission show that this risk would be reduced by 11.9% (7.1% 17.0%). When using USDHHS guidelines, the proportion of HIV-1 positive individuals eligible for HAART reached 56.3% (49.1% 63.2%) and the impact of HAART on the annual risk of HIV- transmission reached 71.8% (64.5%–77.5%). The population impact of HAART on reducing sexual transmission of HIV-1 is likely to be small under WHO guidelines, and reducing the spread of HIV-1 will depend on further strengthening of conventional prevention efforts. A much higher impact of HAART is to be expected if USDHHS guidelines are used. (author's)
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