Your search found 10 Results

  1. 1
    068511

    No-scalpel vasectomy in the United States.

    Antarsh L

    [Unpublished] 1989. Presented at the First International Symposium on No-Scalpel Vasectomy, Bangkok, Thailand, December 3-6, 1989. 10 p.

    The paper describes the introduction and use of the no-scalpel vasectomy in the United States. Vasectomy is popular in the U.S., with 336,000 of them performed in 1987 almost exclusively buy urologists, family practitioners, and surgeons. Receiving no government funding for the new procedure's introduction in the U.S., the Association for Voluntary Surgical Contraception (AVSC) turned to family planning clinics, Planned Parenthoods, and medical schools to reach experienced vasectomists interested in co-sponsoring orientation seminars for other doctors. Programs were held in 1988, in California, Massachusetts and New York, in which attendees were provided self-training packages, and asked to report their experiences with the new technique. Field reports were received from 25 physicians on 2,237 vasectomies, and included both positive and negative comments. Even though the technique is uncomplicated, physicians generally found the technique difficult to master with only teaching materials. Accordingly, the U.S. training model was modified to include a rubbermodel f the scrotal skin and underlying was with the training packet, visits to practitioners' offices by clinical instructors, a compressed training period of 1 day, and hands on training. A minimum of 6-9 cases is generally required to properly learn the technique. 3-4 training seminars will be conducted over the next year in different regions of the U.S. in addition to other efforts aimed at meeting demand for training from interested doctors. Care is taken in choosing instructors and participants, with interest especially strong in training of trainers. Of central concern to the AVSC is their ability to keep pace with growing demand for training, while ensuring 6-12 month follow-up and high-quality instruction and practice of the technique.
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  2. 2
    011374

    [Voluntary sterilization in France and in the world] La sterilisation volontaire en France et dans le monde.

    Palmer R; Dourlen-Rollier AM; Audebert A; Geraud R

    Paris, Masson, 1981. 277 p.

    This monograph, directed not only to medical and paramedical personnel but to sterilization seekers as well, touches upon all aspects of voluntary sexual sterilization. The history of sterilization is follwed by a review of female and male anatomy and physiology, and of present available and reversible methods of contraception. All surgical, laparoscopic, tubal, electrocoagulation, culdoscopic, or hysteroscopic methods of female sterilization are described, and results, including morbidity and mortality, complication rates, side effects, and failure rates are presented. This part of the monograph is illustrated with clear and schematic drawings. Problems related to demand for reversal of sterilization are discussed. The same is done for male sterilization, its techniques and complications. The monograph discusses the ever increasing demographic problem in the world , and the role and the extent of voluntary sexual sterilization in industrialized countries and in third world countries, stressing the efforts of those international agencies, such as WHO, IPPF, the Population Council, the European Council, UNFPA, and the World Federation of Associations for Voluntary Sterilization, which promote sterilization around the world, and offer sterilization services. The authors then investigate the role of the physician in the decision to recur to sterilization as a permanent contraceptive method, and in deciding the proper surgical technique. A special chapter discusses the psychological conflicts related to sterilization, especially those which arise before the intervention, and which may very well represent the strongest contraindication to sterilization. A final chapter is devoted to France and to the sociocultural aspects which make sterilization more or less acceptable, the existing legislation, and the professional problems linked to sterilization interventions.
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  3. 3
    007498
    Peer Reviewed

    Sequelae of vasectomy. Report of a Meeting on Vasectomy, organized by the Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction held at WHO, Geneva, 3-6 August 1981.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction

    Contraception. 1982 Feb; 25(2):119-23.

    In response to enquiries received by the World Health Organization (WHO) from several countries, the WHO Special Program of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction convened a meeting of experts in Geneva during August 1981 to review the available animal, clinical, and epidemiological data on vasectomy, with particular emphasis on clinical implications of longterm sequelae of vasectomy in cardiovascular disease. The occurrence of circulating antibodies to sperm antigens has been demonstrated after vasectomy in all animal species studied thus far by various techniques. Prospective clinical studies of vasectomized and nonvasectomized men have been conducted at 4 centers in the U.S. involving clinical and laboratory evaluation of subjects before surgery and at intervals thereafter. A total of 412 vasectomized men were enrolled in these studies; most were followed for 2, 3, or 4 years. The only significant finding was the development of antibody to sperm antigens. Alexander and Clarkson first reported that vasectomy increases the extent and severity of diet-induced atherosclerosis in cynomolgus monkeys. In a 2nd study, Clarkson and Alexander extended their previous findings to evaluate the effects of vasectomy on naturally occurring atherosclerosis in rhesus monkeys. The mechanism by which vasectomy exacerbates atherosclerosis in monkeys has not been defined. At present epidemiological data which have been published come from observations in the U.S. and United Kingdom and in particular from 2 studies involving 4830 and 1764 vasectomized men studied at about 5-6 years after surgery. No health risks of vasectomy were detected in these early years. Other epidemiological projects are in progress in the U.S. Various options were discussed for further epidemiological studies which might be conducted in developing countries where large numbers of men have been vasectomized. The cohort approach and the case control method, the 2 main study options, are briefly reviewed.
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  4. 4
    800893

    Sterilization Services at Planned Parenthood of Maryland.

    Trimble FH

    MARYLAND STATE MEDICAL JOURNAL. 1980 May; 29(5):68-9.

    In response to the growing public demand for non-hospital sterilization services, the Planned Parenthood Clinic in Baltimore began providing vasectomy services in April, 1971. Between 1971-1979, 4117 vasectomies were performed at the clinic under local anesthesia. Prior to vasectomy the patient is given a medical exam and a medical history is obtained. The patient is also interviewed by a counselor. Vasectomies are generally performed on Friday afternoons, and follow-up appointments are made until a negative semen analysis is obtained. The clinic has performed 73 minilaparotomies. Patients who wish to have a minilaparotomy must make 4-5 visits to the clinic. During the first visit the patient is seen by a counselor. During the 2nd visit a medical exam is given and a medical history is obtained. Blood, urine, and gonorrhoea tests are performed and a pap smear is obained. The counselor then explains all the risks involved in the procedure and an appointment for the operation is made if the patient wishes to continue. Operative procedures include: 1) inserting a Hulka tenaculum sound; 2) administering a local anesthesia; 3) making a 2-5 cm incision; and 4) performing a Pomeroy ligation. The operation takes 20-30 minutes and the patient is usually discharged 2 hours later. The patient is told to call the physician at any time if she experiences any difficulties and to return for a follow-up visit 2-4 weeks later.
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  5. 5
    746753

    Illustration bank collection d'illustrations.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 1974. 107 p.

    Included in this illustration bank collection are illustrations of pregnancy at full term, normal delivery, vasectomy operations, condoms, a diaphragm being placed over the cervix, the applciation of spermicidal cream to a diaphragm, and the lippes loop.
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  6. 6
    790479

    Vasectomy: operative procedures and sterility tests not standardized.

    Family Planning Perspectives. March-April 1979; 11(2):122, 126.

    Disparity in operative procedures and postoperative tests (in establishing sterility) was the main finding of a survey of 50 vasectomy clinics (37 responded) which performed more than 10,800 of the 25,000 clinic vasectomies in 1977. The surveyed clinics used at least 10 different techniques to cut the vas, with excision and ligation accounting for only 27% of all procedures. Bilateral vertical incision under local anesthesia was the most common method used in clinical vasectomies; midline vertical and horizontal incisions were also used. Length of resected vas ranged from 5-10 mm. to 40-50 mm. Although all clinics utilized postoperative microscopic examination of the semen to determine sterility, clinic standards for determining when and under what conditions the examination should be performed were not uniform. The Planned Parenthood Federation of America (thru its National Medical Advisory Committee) formulated a standard protocol for evaluating sterility. The protocol requires the man to have 15 postoperative ejaculates before his semen can be analyzed for sterility; at least 1 specimen should exhibit azoospermia (absence of living sperm) before contraception can be discontinued. The presence of motile sperm after 25 ejaculations or nonmotile sperm after 50 ejaculations, may require a second operation.
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  7. 7
    765514

    Techniques of male sterilization.

    MORRIS N; ARTHURE H

    In: Morris, N. and Arthure, H. Sterilization as a means of birth control in men and women. London, Peter Owen, 1976. p. 80-100

    Vasectomy was 1st used at the start of the 20th century and became prominent in the 1950s in family planning programs in Asian countries. The secondary sex characteristics do not change after vasectomy, and there is normal erectile power, libido, orgasm, and ejaculatory volume. Spermatogenesis continues normally in men following vasectomy, and plasma testosterone levels remain unchanged. Vasectomy involves cutting both vasa deferentes through an incision in the scrotum which is usually performed with local anesthesia without hospitalization. Preliminary counseling is necessary so that both partners understand the nature and effects of the operation. Semen banks may be used when available for men undergoing vasectomy. There is no evidence for the greater efficiency of 1 technique over the other. Patients must submit sperm samples for examination after 8-12 weeks and then every 4 weeks until 2 consecutive specimens are negative. Possible complications include: 1) a vasovagal reaction; 2) skin discoloration; 3) edema of the scrotal skin, 4) postoperative pain, 5) infection; 6) ulceration and gangrene of the scrotal skin, and 7) hydrocele or epididymo-orchitis. Successful reanastamosis of the vas deferens with reappearance of sperm can be accomplished in 50-80% of the patients, and the semen is not of quality to insure impregnation in 1/4 of these cases.
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  8. 8
    735549

    Conclusions and recommendations of the IPPF Central Medical Committee (CMC) and its panel of experts on sterilization.

    Keinman RL

    In: Kleinman, R.L., ed. Male and female sterilization. A report of the meeting of the IPPF Panel of Experts on Sterilization, Bombay, January 11-14, 1973. London, International Planned Parenthood Federation, 1973. p. 8-12

    The conclusions and recommendations fall into 3 categories, i.e., policy, administrative and technical. Important points in the 1st category include; that sterilization be available and avilable on request, that it be voluntary, and that facilities for reversal procedures be free and avilable. Administrave recommendations include; that no arbitrary hospital stay be assinged to vasectomy patients, that no arbitrary selection criteria concerning previous training or surgical skill be used in accepting personnel for vasectomy patients, that no arbitrary selection criteria concerning previous training or surgical skill be used in accepting personnel for vasectomy training, and that endoscopic techniques should not be done without an anesthetist. Among the technical recommendations were: that postpartum sterilization under local anesthesia by laparotomy be encouraged, as that is the simplest of all female procedures; taht vaginal procedures should only be done with proper operative and anathestic facilities; that division of the uteirne tubes by the Pomeroy technique using 0 chromic catgut should be employed in mass programs of female sterilization; the removal of part of the uterine tube for biopsy and histological examination as a check on the success of the operation should not be done; general anesthesia should never be used for a simple vasectomy unless there are complications; and that tetanus toxoid should not be given to avoid infection.
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  9. 9
    753743

    An overview of research approaches to the control of male fertility.

    Perry MI; Speidel JJ; Winter JN

    In: Sciarra, J.J., Markland, C. and Speidel, J.J., eds. Control of male fertility. (Proceedings of a Workshop on the Control of Male Fertility, San Francisco, June 19-21, 1974). Hagerstown, Maryland, Harper and Row, 1975. p. 274-307

    Literature on research approaches to permanent and relatively reversible methods of male fertility control is reviewed. Sources and expenditures for research into male fertility control are noted. Permanent methods discussed include electrocautery of the vas, transcutaneous interruption of the vas, vasectomy clips, chemical occlusion of the vas, and passive immunization. Reversible methods reviewed include vasovasotomy, intravasal plugs, and vas valves. Current research into animal models, reversibility after vas occlusion, nonocclusive surgical techniques, pharmacological alteration of male reproductive function, including adrenergic blocking agents, steroidal compounds, inhibitors of gonadotropin secretion, clomiphene citrate, organosiloxanes, prostaglandins, alpha-chlorohydrin, heterocyclic agents, and alkylating agents, and delivery systems for antifertility agents is discussed. Research into semen storage and improved condoms is also reviewed. As a relatively low proportion of funds are committed to research in male fertility control, a greater investment in applied and clinical research is warranted.
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  10. 10
    020882

    The experience of the Association for Voluntary Sterilization in supporting vasectomy programs.

    Jezowski TW; Ahmad JS

    [Unpublished] 1982. Paper prepared for Conference on Vasectomy, Colombo, Sri Lanka, Oct. 4-7, 1982. 21 p.

    Discusses the factors responsible for the decline of male acceptance of vasectomy over the past decade. The Association for Voluntary Sterilization (AVS) is a nonprofit organization working in the United States which helps funding of similar programs in other developed and developing countries. Reasons for the decline of vasectomy acceptance include the lack of attention paid to male sterilization in countries with family planning programs, the introduction of new technology for female sterilization, the introduction of new effective methods of contraception, and the exaggerated sexual role of the male and the need to protect his virility. The author reviews successful vasectomy programs and finds that, to be successful, a program should have strong leadership, a focussed design, clinic hours that would not interfere with patients' working schedules, and should pay attention to the needs of men, e.g., emphasizing that vasectomy does not cause impotency. The program should also have a community-based orientation, since all the services are not hospital-based and can be brought to the client's home, thereby emphasizing the minor nature of the surgery. AVS believes that vasectomy as a means of family planning can be effective. It is safe, inexpensive, simple, and deliverable. A special fund was allocated in 1983 to stimulate the development of several pilot and demonstration projects in a variety of countries.
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