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  1. 1
    048309

    Fourteenth annual report.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 1985 Dec. ix, 219 p.

    In response to mandates of the 1984 International Conference on Population, WHO's Special Program of Research, Development, and Research Training in Human Reproduction has established new Task Forces, strengthened the research capabilities of institutions in developing countries, intensified research on steroidal contraception, expanded attention to the social determinants and consequences of fertility, and increased collaboration with other major international programs engaged in research in human reproduction. The bulk of this annual report includes a technical review of the activities and plans of the Program's 9 Task Forces: Tasks Force on Long-Acting Systemic Agents; Task Force on Postovulatory Methods; Task Force on Vaccines; Task Force on Plants; Task Force on Male Methods; Task Force on Infertility; Task Force on Safety and Efficacy; Task Force on Behavioral and Social Determinants of Fertility; and work in the strengthening of research resources. Each Task Force report is presented in 4 major sections: the field of interest, comprising a brief review of the relevant technical subjects; the strategic plan, explaining how work is structured and scheduled; collaboration with other programs; and activities of the Task Force through the end of 1985. Also included in this report are sections on resources for research and management and financial matters. A Committee on Resources for Research has just been formed to review strategies for strengthening research resources in developing countries.
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  2. 2
    002311

    Fertility regulating agents from plants.

    Soejarto DD; Bingel AS; Slaytor M; Farnsworth NR

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 1978; 56(3):343-52.

    The WHO Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction has established a 6-center program to investigate new fertility regulating agents from plants for use in humans. Establishment of the project was preceded by a comprehensive search of the literature, including the following sources: 1) articles on medical botany; 2) reports of testing crude plant extracts for fertility regulating purposes; 3) reports of in vitro effects of plant extracts; and 4) reports of a limited number of experimental studies in human subjects. The limitations of these sources of data are discussed. Information on 3000 plants was collected and computerized, using a weighting system, in order to assign priorities on the plant substances most promising for further study. The 6 centers will then procede to initiate pharmacological and chemical studies on the priority substances. Both male and female antifertility agents are included in the study. (Summary in FRE)
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  3. 3
    795757

    Fertility control sought from plants in worldwide effort.

    Small WE

    American Pharmacy. 1979 Sep; 19(10):23-4.

    Pharmaceutical scientists and botanists from all over the world met at the University of Illinois to map a 3-year program for collecting and testing plants which may be effective in regulating fertility. Launched in July, 1979, the project will continue through May, 1982. The study is sponsored by the World Health Organization. More than 100 pounds of each plant sample are needed for the pharmacological and phytochemical tests. 300 plant species will be studied, which represents only a fraction of the almost 4000 species for which fertility-regulating information has been gathered. In 1974 Americans paid about $3 billion for prescriptions of plant-extracted drugs. In the same year the pharmaceutical companies devoted only $200,000 of a $1 million research effort to the study of plant extracts. The plant data are being analyzed and stored with the help of a computer system developed at the Illinois College of Pharmacy. The Natural Products Alert (NAPRALERT) system considers whether or not a plant is poisonous or has adverse side effects. An estimated 5000 scientific periodicals are computerized per year. Some 4000 plants are listed, but another 4000 with fertility regulation potential are expected to be recorded. Some 750,000 species of flowering plants grow on earth.
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  4. 4
    057543

    Evaluation of the work of the Task Force on Indigenous Plants for Fertility Regulation of the Special Programme of Research in Human Reproduction.

    Karolinska Institutet. Institutionen for Toxikologi

    In: Assessment of the WHO Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction [HRP]. II. Task Force reports. Country reports, [compiled by] Sweden. Swedish Agency for Research Cooperation with Developing Countries [SAREC]. Stockholm, Sweden, SAREC, 1983 Apr. [46] p..

    This report describes and evaluates the work of the Task Force on Indigenous Plants for Fertility Regulation of the Special Programme of Research in Human Reproduction at WHO. The goal of the project is to set up a network of collaborating centers to train personnel, design bioassays, isolate and test plant substances that are safe and effective by oral route for "morning after" pills or anti-implantation agents or male contraceptives. Plants chosen for assay were selected by a literature search including ethnomedical sources. All data were computerized, weighted and rank ordered. 300 of the 4500 species fell into the high priority group. 4 research centers now participate: Chinese University of Hong Kong, Seoul National University, University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka and University of Illinois. In 1980-1981 the literature surveillance component of the Task Force provided bi-annual literature updates on the assigned plants. Primate studies are planned for 1982 and phase I human trials are anticipated in 1985 for the 1st compound. Zoapatle (Montanoa tomentosa) is a plant used for centuries in Mexico to terminate early pregnancy. An active compound, zoapatanol, and another more stable analogue are in pre-phase I trials. 4 plants from India are being examined for sperm agglutination activity, the spermatogenesis inhibiting effect of Koenchai (Chinese celery) and the mechanism of action of gossypol are being researched.
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