Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 4 Results

  1. 1
    800299
    Peer Reviewed

    Acceptability of drugs for male fertility regulation: prospectus and some preliminary data.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction. Task Force on Psychosocial Research in Family Planning

    CONTRACEPTION. 1980 Feb; 21(2):121-34.

    A 7-country WHO (World Health Organization) field trial on hormonal drugs for males administered either by daily pill or monthly injection, is being undertaken. The trials, being conducted in Hong Kong, Bangkok, London, Mexico City, Santiago, Seoul, and Toronto, provide an opportunity to assess acceptability and effects on sexuality of these new male contraceptives. The research uses repeated interviews over a 15-month period, conducted by social and biomedical scientists. The respondents are asked to compare their evaluation of the method with previously-used male or female methods and to indicate whether they feel the method modified or interfered with sexual desire, feelings, and/or performance. Methodology of the trials is explained. The hormones used, numbers of volunteers participating, and other factors important for each trial site are tabulated. Preliminary results are available from some of the trial sites The new method, either pill or injectable, was ranked highest as to acceptability, followed by vasectomy and condoms. Respondents favored self-administered, reversible methods. In fact, irreversibility was found to be the most negative feature of vasectomy, indicating that a reversible form of sterilization would be acceptable. Respondents in all trial sites favored 3-month injectables the most and permanent methods the least. Effectiveness and ease of use were important in a contraceptive.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    065183

    Bridging the gender gap in contraception: another hurdle cleared.

    Handelsman DJ

    MEDICAL JOURNAL OF AUSTRALIA. 1991 Feb 18; 154(4):230-3.

    The 1st published study of efficacy of a hormonal male contraceptive, by the WHO Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction, employed weekly deep intramuscular injections of testosterone enanthate. 271 fertile married men at 10 centers worldwide participated for 18 months. The goal of this preliminary study was to determine if azoospermia was necessary or sufficient for effective contraception. Azoospermia was produced in 157 men, who then participated in a 12-month trial. There was 1 pregnancy, for a failure rate of 0.8 per 100 person-years, highly effective in comparison with oral contraceptives, IUDs and injectables. There was a 12% annual discontinuation rate reasons cited were acne (4%), behavioral effects such as aggression or increased libido (1%), and other medical reasons (1%), e.g. weight gain, polycythemia, hyperlipidemia or hypertension. Recruitment of study subjects was difficult in developed countries until direct public appeals met with success. Future developments in the male hormonal contraceptive field will require a more acceptable administration route. To develop this, longer-acting injectables or implants utilizing testosterone cybutanate (20AET-1), or other combinations of testosterone with a progestin or a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist are envisioned. The effect of incomplete azoospermia and the fertilizing capacity of remaining sperm is a serious issue for research. Each more crucial is resolution of the social, political and legal problems involved in male hormonal contraceptive research. Probably reform of the US product liability litigation procedures will do more to advance contraceptive development than any other single factor.
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    041926

    Association for Voluntary Sterilization - Consultant Team. Trip report: the People's Republic of China, Beijing, Chongqing, Wuhan, Guangzhou, June 19-30, 1985.

    Huber D; Fathalla M; Gojaseni P; Goldstein M; Lippes J; Minor K; Rauff M; Sciarra J; Rauff A

    [Unpublished] 1985. 41, [6] p.

    The Association for Voluntary Sterilization consultant team visited Beijing, Chongqing, Wuhan and Guangzhou, China in June 1985, to review innovative nonsurgical methods of male and female sterilization. There are 2 variations on vasectomy, performed with special clamps that obviate a surgical incision. The 1st is a circular clamp for grasping the vas through the skin, and the 2nd is a small, curved, sharp hemostat for puncturing the skin and the vas sheath, used for ligation. Vas occlusion with 0.02 ml of a solution of phenol and cyanoacrylate has been performed on 500,000 men since 1972. The procedure is done under local anesthesia, and is controlled by injecting red and blue dye on contralateral sides. If urine is not brown, vasectomy by ligature is performed. The wound is closed with gauze only. Semen analysis is not done, but patients are advised to use contraception for the 1st 10 ejaculations. Pregnancy rates after vasectomy by percutaneous injection were reported as 0 in 5 groups of several hundred men each, 11.4% in 1 group and 2.4% in another group. The total complication rate after vasectomy by clamping was 1.8% in 121,000 men. 422 medical school graduates with surgical training have been certified in this vasectomy method. Chinese men are pleased with this method because it avoids surgery by knife, and asepsis, anesthesia and counseling are excellent. Female sterilization by blind transcervical delivery of a phenol-quinacrine mixture has been done on 200,000 women since 1970 by research teams in Guangzhou and Shanghai. A metal cannula is inserted into the tubal opening, tested for position by an injection of saline, and 0.1-0.12 ml of sclerosing solution is instilled. Correct placement is verified by x-ray, an IUD is inserted, and after 3 months a repeat hysteroscopy is done to test uterine pressure. Pregnancy rates have been 1-2.5%, generally in the 1st 2 years. Although this technique is tedious, requiring great skill and patient cooperation, it can be mastered by paramedicals. The WHO is assisting the Chinese on setting up large studies on safety and effectiveness, as well as toxicology studies needed, to export the methods to other countries.
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    057543

    Evaluation of the work of the Task Force on Indigenous Plants for Fertility Regulation of the Special Programme of Research in Human Reproduction.

    Karolinska Institutet. Institutionen for Toxikologi

    In: Assessment of the WHO Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction [HRP]. II. Task Force reports. Country reports, [compiled by] Sweden. Swedish Agency for Research Cooperation with Developing Countries [SAREC]. Stockholm, Sweden, SAREC, 1983 Apr. [46] p..

    This report describes and evaluates the work of the Task Force on Indigenous Plants for Fertility Regulation of the Special Programme of Research in Human Reproduction at WHO. The goal of the project is to set up a network of collaborating centers to train personnel, design bioassays, isolate and test plant substances that are safe and effective by oral route for "morning after" pills or anti-implantation agents or male contraceptives. Plants chosen for assay were selected by a literature search including ethnomedical sources. All data were computerized, weighted and rank ordered. 300 of the 4500 species fell into the high priority group. 4 research centers now participate: Chinese University of Hong Kong, Seoul National University, University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka and University of Illinois. In 1980-1981 the literature surveillance component of the Task Force provided bi-annual literature updates on the assigned plants. Primate studies are planned for 1982 and phase I human trials are anticipated in 1985 for the 1st compound. Zoapatle (Montanoa tomentosa) is a plant used for centuries in Mexico to terminate early pregnancy. An active compound, zoapatanol, and another more stable analogue are in pre-phase I trials. 4 plants from India are being examined for sperm agglutination activity, the spermatogenesis inhibiting effect of Koenchai (Chinese celery) and the mechanism of action of gossypol are being researched.
    Add to my documents.