Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 4 Results

  1. 1
    080363

    The World Bank atlas. 25th anniversary edition.

    World Bank

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 1992. 36 p.

    This atlas presents social, economic, and environmental statistics for 200 economies throughout the world, including statistics for 15 economies throughout the world, including statistics for 15 economies of the former Soviet Union. The following social/demographic indices are presented: population growth rate, 1980-1991; under-5 mortality rate, 1991; daily calorie supply/capita, 1989; illiteracy rate, 1990; and female labor force, 1991. GNP/capita, 1991; GNP/capita growth rate, 1980-91; and shares of agriculture, exports, and investment in GDP in 1991 comprise the economic data. Finally, GDP output/kilogram energy used, 1990; annual water use and annual water use/capita, 1970-87; forest coverage, 1989; and change in forest coverage, 1980-89, are presented as economic indicators. All figures are reported in color graphic format. Technical notes and World Bank structure and functions are discussed in closing sections. The text also cautions that the differing statistical systems and data collection methods and capabilities employed internationally demand that caution be taken against directly comparing statistical coverages and definitions.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    077120

    The World Bank atlas 1989. 22nd edition.

    World Bank

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 1989. 29 p.

    This 22nd edition of the Atlas presents current economic and social indicators that describe trends, indicate orders of magnitude, and characterize significant differences among countries. This year illiteracy rates, share of agriculture in gross domestic product, and daily calorie supply per capita are presented in the main table, and illiteracy rates rather than school enrollment ratios are charted. The Atlas reveals that real per capita income has risen during the 1980s for the majority of countries. However, more than 10% of the world's population lives in countries where the real gross national product per capita is not growing; more than half live in countries where the average gross national product per capita is still under $500. Relative income levels are also affected by fluctuations in exchange rates and terms of trade, which have been sharp during the decade. Hence the levels and ranking of gross national product per capita estimates have changed in ways not necessarily related to economic performance. The social indicators provide evidence of improved standards of living since the early 1970s. Recent trends are difficult to discern because conditions change gradually and data on these conditions are less current and less frequently gathered.
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    052075

    The World Bank atlas 1988.

    World Bank

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 1988. 29 p.

    This 21st edition of the Atlas presents economic, social and demographic indicators in the form of tables and charts covering the world. The main yardstick of economic activity in a country is the gross national product. 60 developing countries have had declining gross national product, although for most countries real per capita income has risen. Social indicators show evidence of improved standards of living since the early 1980s. Population estimates and other demographic data are from the UN Population Division; education data are from the United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization, and calorie data are from the Food and Agriculture Organization. A total of 10 charts and maps show world population; statistics on 185 countries and territories; gross national product, 1987; population growth rate, 1980-87; gross national product per capita growth rate, 1980-87; agriculture in gross domestic product, 1987; daily calorie supply, 1985; life expectancy at birth, 1987; total fertility rate, 1987; and school enrollment ratio, 1985. Throughout the Atlas, data for China do not include Taiwan. The World Bank, a multilateral development institution, consists of 2 distinct entities: the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, which finances its lending operations from borrowings in the world capital markets, and the International Development Association, which extends assistance to the poorest countries on easier terms.
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    027804

    Country statement: Ethiopia.

    [Unpublished] 1984. Presented at the Second African Population Conference, Arusha, Tanzania, January 9-13, 1984. 21 p.

    This discussion of Ethiopia focuses on: sources of demographic data; population size and age-sex distribution; urbanization; fertility; marital status of the population; mortality and health; rate of natural increase; economic activity and labor force activity rates; food production; education; population policies and programs; and population in development planning. As of 1983, Ethiopia's population was estimated at 33.7 million. Agriculture is the mainstay of the economy. Ethiopia has not yet conducted a population census, however, the 1st population and housing census is planned for 1984. The population is young with children under 15 years of age constituting 45.4% of the total population; 3.5% of the population are aged 65 years and older. The degree of urbanization is very low while the urban growth rate is very high. Most of the country is rural with only 15% of the population living in localities of 2000 or more inhabitants. In 1980-81 the crude birthrate was 46.9/1000. The total fertility rate was 6.9. Of those aged 15 years and older, 69.2% of males and 71.3% of females are married. According to the 1980-81 Demographic Survey the estimates of the levels of mortality were a crude death rate of 18.4/1000 and an infant mortality rate of 144/1000. At this time 45% of the population have access to health services. It is anticipated that 80% of the population will be covered by health care services in 10 years time. Ethiopia is increasing at a very rapid rate of natural increase; the 1980 estimation was 2.9% per annum. Despite the rich endowments in agricultural potential, Ethiopia is not self-sufficient in food production and reamins a net importer of grain. Enrollment at various levels of education is expanding rapidly. There is no official population policy. Financial assistance received from the UN Fund for Population Activities and the UN International Children's Emergency Fund for population programs is shown.
    Add to my documents.