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  1. 1
    040281

    [Workshop on Sensitization of Communication Professionals to Population Problems, Dakar, 29 August, 1986 at Breda] Seminaire atelier de sensibilisation des professionnels de la communication aux problemes de population, Dakar du 25 au 29 Aout 1986 au Breda.

    Senegal. Ministere du Plan et de la Cooperation

    Dakar, Senegal, UNICOM, Unite de Communication, 1986. 215 p. (Unite de Communication Projet SEN/81/P01)

    This document is the result of a workshop organized by the Communication Unit of the Senegalese Ministry of Planning and Cooperation to sensitize some 30 Senegalese journalists working in print and broadcast media to the importance of the population variable in development and to prepare them to contribute to communication programs for population. Although it is addressed primarily to professional communicators, it should also be of interest to educators, economists, health workers, demographers, and others interested in the Senegalese population. The document is divided into 5 chapters, the 1st of which comprises a description of the history and objectives of the Communication Unit, which is funded by the UN Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA). Chapter 1 also presents the workshop agenda. Chapter 2 provides an introduction to population problems and different currents of thought regarding population since Malthus, a discussion of the utilization and interpretation of population variables, and definitions of population indicators. The 3rd chapter explores problems of population and development in Senegal, making explicit the theoretical concepts of the previous chapter in the context of Senegal. Topics discussed in chapter 3 include the role of UNFPA in introducing the population variable in development projects in Senegal; population and development, the situation and trends of the Senegalese population; socioeconomic and cultural characteristics of the Senegalese population; sources of sociodemographic data on Senegal; the relationship between population, resources, environment and development in Senegal; and the Senegalese population policy. Chapter 4 discusses population communication, including population activities of UNESCO and general problems of social communication; a synthesis and interpretation of information needs and the role of population communication; and a summary of the workshop goals, activities, and achievements. Chapter 5 contains annexes including a list of participants, opening and closing remarks, an evaluation questionnaire regarding the workshop participants, and press clippings relating to the workshop and to Senegal's population.
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  2. 2
    062548

    The role of the World Bank in shaping third world population policy.

    Sai FT; Chester LA

    In: Population policy: contemporary issues, edited by Godfrey Roberts. New York, New York/London, England, Praeger, 1990. 179-91.

    The primary role of the World Bank is to assist Third World governments in the economic and social development process. Given the World Bank's view that reductions in fertility and mortality will lead to improvements in productivity, GNP growth, and maternal-child health, its population activities are focused on encouraging governments to adopt fertility decline as a national development objective and on providing loans for implementing population programs. The Bank's sector work, including country economic reports and population sector analyses, has been most ambitious in countries where there was no population policy or program, especially sub-Saharan African countries. Even in pronatalist countries, this sector work has been instrumental in leading to an open discussion of population issues. In other countries, such as Indonesia, the Bank's population sector work has been instrumental in helping governments to develop and implement a population program. Through the World Bank's access to the highest levels of government and its links to a wide range of ministries, it is in a position to influence governments by providing information about the seriousness of the population problem. In Africa, this type of dialogue has been facilitated through a series of regional senior policy and management-level seminars. The Bank is further able to shape policy development through its involvement in project identification and implementation. In recent years, Bank-funded projects have placed greater emphasis on management, institution building, demand-generation activities, and involvement of the private sector in service delivery. In the area of research, the Bank's current priority is the internal efficiency of alternative policy and program strategies. Evaluations have identified the policy dealogue that links population issues with other aspects of development as the World Bank's most effective role.
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  3. 3
    026560

    When breasts are bad for business [letter]

    Chetley A

    BMJ. British Medical Journal. 1984 Sep 15; 289(6446):695.

    John Dobbing's review of the British television program, "When Breasts are Bad for Business," contained a number of inaccurate statements. The World Health Organization's international code for the marketing of breast milk substitutes was not developed by a group of emotional activists; it was carefully developed in consultation with governments, international agencies, and experts in science, medicine, and marketing, and subsequently, ratified by 118 governments. According to the reviewer, the industry is abiding by the code; in reality, only 1 company has agreed to abide by the code, 5 or 6 companies are considering some of the code's provisions, and the approximately 80 remaining companies have given no indication concerning their willingness to adopt the code. Contrary to the reviewer's interpretation, the code does not recommend the promotion of infant formulas by any health facility, including hospitals. Furthermore, the effort to reform the marketing of infant formulas is not a veiled attempt to abolish all processed baby foods. The purpose of the code is to ensure that infant formulas are used only when necessary and not for routine feeding. The benefits of breast feeding are clearly recognized by health professionals. The reviewer's contention that the infant formula industry has been an active supporter of research which has promoted breast feeding must be refuted. Recommendations stemming from research on breast feeding have not been implemented. Neither the medical profession nor the industry has made an effort to disseminate information on the value of breast feeding nor on the methods available for promoting breast feeding.
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