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  1. 1
    328495
    Peer Reviewed

    Fighting the brain drain.

    McColl K

    BMJ. British Medical Journal. 2008 Sep 15; 337:958-960.

    In sub-Saharan Africa, 3% of the world's health workforce cares for 10% of the world's population bearing 24% of the global disease burden. Developing countries need an extra 4.3 million health workers, and urgent action is required to scale up education and training. Last month the World Health Organization's Commission on Social Determinants of Health emphasised the importance of building and strengthening the health workforce if the goal of achieving health equity within a generation is to be realised. International cooperation will be essential to strengthen health systems and to manage the migration of health workers from developing to developed countries. But these measures will take time. What can African and Asian health systems do to recruit and retain health workers now? How can health workers be persuaded to practise in rural areas? Guidelines, commissioned by the Global Health Workforce Alliance, aim to help countries make the best use of incentives to attract and retain health professionals. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    022708

    Report of the second advisory group meeting held in Kuala Lumpur at the Hotel Majestic on the 18-19 September 1972.

    Inter Governmental Coordinating Commitee. Southeast Asia Regional Cooperation in Family and Population Planning. Secretariat

    [Unpublished] 1972. 67 p.

    This report of the proceedings of the 2nd Advisory Group Meeting covers the following: the workshop sessions; the progress report; the role and functions of the Intergovernmental Coordinating Committee (IGCC); and the speech of Encik Mohd. Khir Johardi. The progress report reviews all the projects and programs that will be initially implemented by the Secretariat IGCC: the regional program for observation and exchange of information; the regional program for exchange of experience through workshop in the various activities of family and population planning; clearinghouse activity; regional research project on thromboembolic disease; the special project to assist member countries without a national family planning program (Laotian Seminar, consultants for Khmer Republic, training 12 Khmers in the Philippines, the contraceptive supplies for the Khmer Republic); population and development planning workshop; joint ECAFE/IGCC/Government of Malaysia Training Course for Statisticians and Demographers; workshop on adult education and family planning; regional incentive program; Second Ministerial Conference and Third IGCC Meeting; and first obstetrician and gynecological meeting within the IGCC Member Countries. Member of the senior government officials who met at the 1st and 2nd Meeting were keen on the idea of exchange of professional staff among member countries for a short period of time. Some of the participants particularly at the 2nd Senior Government Officials Meeting felt that it is necessary to set up IGCC Regional Training Center to be utilized for the training of all facets of family planning program within the IGCC Region. Appendixes review backgrounds and objectives of the visits to Singapore, Indonesia, and the Philippines; report on the 1st Regional Training Workshop in Jakarta during December 1972, progress to date on clearinghouse activities, the ECAFE trip during August 1972, and the First National Seminar on Population and Family Well Being during August 1972; and discuss the population and development planning workshop proposal, the proposed workshop by IGCC on adult education and family life planning, and the proposed meeting of panel of regional advisers on sexual sterilization.
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