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  1. 1
    080491

    A comparative analysis of CCCD project health care financing activities.

    Dunlop DW; Evlo K

    Arlington, Virginia, John Snow [JSI], Resources for Child Health [REACH], 1988 Sep. [8], 99, [31] p. (USAID Contract No. DPE-5927-C-00-5068-00)

    Building upon smallpox and measles immunization campaigns originally supported by USAID, the Centers for Disease Control, and the World Health Organization, the African region Combatting Childhood Communicable Diseases (CCCD) Project began providing immunizations, oral rehydration therapy for children with diarrhea, and malaria prophylaxis services in 1982. The project was approved in September, 1981, for spending of $47 million through fiscal 1988, and was designed to be implemented through existing publicly operated health service delivery systems with recipient CCCD project countries helping to finance recurrent costs and providing human resources for project implementation. Accordingly, almost all country project agreements were written to ensure that country governments would provide financial support for activities through direct budget allocations, user fees, or some combination of the 2. Regular analyses of service provision were also agreed upon. The development and implementation of user fees have taken place, but the overall theoretical financial strategy has yet to be met in any country project. This document discusses financing achievements and what more is needed to ensure longer term project financial sustainability. Sections review country-specific agreements to spell out original USAID/country terms on financing components; consider the capacity of CCCD project governments to finance recurrent costs in their respective macroeconomic contexts; present highlights of a review of CCCD project financing activities; summarize an evaluation of alternative health financing options; give conclusions of analyses on the financial sustainability of CCCD project activity; and make recommendations for future USAID CCCD project support with respect to financing and economics.
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  2. 2
    046823

    The state of the world's children 1988.

    Grant JP

    Oxford, England, Oxford University Press, 1988. [9], 86 p.

    The 1988 UNICEF report on the world's children contains chapters describing the multi-sectorial alliance to support child health, the current emphasis on ORT and immunization, the effect of recession on vulnerable children, family rights to knowledge of basic health facts, and support for women in the developing world. Each chapter is illustrated by graphs. There are side panels on programs in specific countries, including Senegal, Syria, Colombia, Bangladesh, Turkey, India, Honduras, Japan and Southern Africa, and highlighted programs including immunization, AIDS, ORT, breast-feeding and tobacco as a test of health. The SAARC is a new regional organization of southern Asian countries committed to immunization and other health goals. Tables of health statistics of the world's nations, divided into 4 groups by "Under 5 Mortality Rate" present basic indicators, nutrition/malnutrition data, health information, education, literacy and media data, demographic indicators, economic indicators and data pertaining to women. The absolute numbers of child deaths had fallen to 16 million in 1980, from 25 million in 1950. Saving children's lives will not exacerbate the population problem because, realizing that their children will survive, families will have fewer children. Furthermore, the methods used to reduce mortality, such as breast feeding and empowerment of families to control their lives, are known to reduce fertility.
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  3. 3
    041365

    Expanded Programme on Immunization: progress and evaluation report by the Director-General.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    [Unpublished] 1985 Nov 19. Presented to the Executive Board, Seventy-seventh Session, Provisional Agenda Item 18. 20 p. (EB77/27)

    The Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) has made major public health gains in the past decade. The central EPI strategy has been to deliver immunization in consonance with other health services, particularly those directed toward mothers and children. However, in the least developed countries and many other developing countries, it does not appear likely that national budgets will be sufficient by 1990 to support full immunization coverage on a sustained basis or that an adequate number of national managers can be assembled to staff effective programs. At the November 1985 meeting of the EPI Global Advisory Group, recommendations were made to accelerate global progress. These recommendations reflect optimism that the 1990 goal of reducing morbidity and mortality by immunizing all children of the world can be achieved, but also acknowledge that many fundamental problems of national program management remain to be resolved. 3 general actions needed are: 1) promote the achievement of the 1990 immunization goal at national and international levels through collaboration among ministries, organizations, and individuals in both the public and private sectors; 2) adopt a mix of complementary strategies for program acceleration; and 3) ensure that rapid increases in coverage can be sustained through mechanisms which strengthen the delivery of other primary health care interventions. The 4 specific actions needed are: 1) provide immunization at every contact point, 2) reduce drop-out rates between first and last immunizations, 3) improve immunization services to the disadvantaged in urban areas, and 4) increase priority for the control of measles, poliomyelitis, and neonatal tetanus. Continued efforts are also required to strengthen disease surveillance and outbreak control, reinforce training and supervision, ensure quality of vaccine production and administration, and pursue research and development.
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  4. 4
    200356

    Causes of mortality change: observations based on the experience of selected countries in the ESCAP Region.

    Ruzicka LT

    In: Mortality and health issues: review of current situation and study guidelines. Bangkok, Thailand, U.N. Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, 1985. 93-97. (Asian Population Studies Series No. 63.)

    In the past 30 years or so, mortality has declined in all countries, and the member countries of Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) are no exception to this general trend. Standardization is most often used in a limited fashion to account for the effect on demographic indices of a changing age and sex structure of the population; this chapter uses it to examine the fast decline in mortality. A decline in mortality may be due to any of the following processes: 1) reduction of exposure to risk, or an increased proportion of the population protected from the risk by immunization or other preventive measures; 2) introduction of effective treatment may result in the considerable reduction of case fatality, and hence of mortality from a given disease; and 3) intervention along both lines. Foremost among the studies of variation of mortality levels among the countries at various stages of socioeconomic development are those associating measures of national income and life expectancy at birth. Economic advance appears not to be a major factor in more recent mortality reductions; a large part of the decline has resulted from the application of broad-based public health programs of insect control, environmental sanitation, and immunization. Mother's educational level, family income, family size, and pattern of child spacing have demonstrable effects on the probability of child survival. Further advancement to understand the complex fabric of social and bioligical processes involved in health protection and health impairments that often lead to death requires joint formulation at the planning stage of methodologies and concepts combining suitable factors from different disciplines. The multidisciplinary approach to research in mortality would lend assurance to the results of studies and would provide a firmer basis for the development of relevant policies to reduce morbidity and mortality.
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  5. 5
    036373

    Accelerated immunization programmes and CSDR: their meaning and broader implications for development [editorial]

    Mandl PE

    ASSIGNMENT CHILDREN. 1985; 69-72:vii-xxvi.

    This editorial introduces a special issue of "Assignment Children" devoted to the theme of universal child immunization by 1990. Not only will this campaign significantly reduce morbidity and mortality from 6 childhood diseases, but it will also, through the experience of massive public participation, create conditions favorable for achieving development goals in areas other than health care. Immunization is a means for enabling those who have grasped the concept of protection of one's children to carry this effort into other areas for other goals. If families are to be empowered in this way, the knowledge and know-how held by the experts at the top must be melded with traditional knowledge and the wish of parents to protect their children from disease and death. The usual concept of development conveys ethnocentric and central power biases as well as a fragemented and sectoral approach. In contrast, accelerated immunization programs represent an example of action within a new development paradigm. This approach addresses not just symptoms, but fundamental causes of underdevelopment in the areas of health and survival. Although the underlying causes of poverty are only marginally affected by such campaigns, the validation of important goals of the majority of the population can release social energy and increase individuals' control over other aspects of their life.
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  6. 6
    033365

    United Nations Children's Fund: report of the Executive Board (15-26 April 1985).

    UNICEF. Executive Board

    New York, New York, United Nations, 1985. v, 58 p. (Economic and Social Council Official Records, 1985. Supplement No. 10; E/1985/31; E/ICEF/1985/12)

    The major decisions of the UN Children's Fund Executive Board in their 1985 session were to: approve several new program recommendations and endores a major emergency assistance program for several African countries; approve initiatives to accelerate the implementation of child survival and development actions, particularly towards the goal of achieving universal immunization of children against 6 major childhood diseases by 1990; adopt a comprehensive policy framework for UN International Children's Emergency Fund (UNICEF) programs concerning women; approve UNICEF revised budget estimates for 1984-85 and budget estimates for 1986-87; and make a number of decisions on ways to improve the administration and the role of the Board. The Board members both reported on and heard evidence of the encouraging results of recent efforts to implement national child survival and development programs. Reports of the successful immunization campaigns in Burkina Faso, Colombia, El Salvador, and Nigeria were welcomed, along with the news that half a million children were saved during the year through the use of oral rehydration therapy. Stronger efforts were encouraged to improve results in the areas of breastfeeding and growth monitoring. Implementation issues in connection with child survival and development actions were a continuing focus of Board attention during the session. The accelerated implementation of child survival and development actions was accorded the highest priority in approving the medium-term plan for 1984-88. The Board also adopted a resolution that sought to draw the attention of world leaders, during their observance of the 40th anniversary of the UN, to the importance of reaffirming their commitment to accelerate the implementation of the child survival and development resolution and realizing universal immunization by 1990. Delegations commended the results of the World Health Organization/UNICEF joint nutrition support program but noted that malnutrition among women and children appeared to be increasing. Water supply and sanitation activities were encouraged, and the Board stressed that those actions should be linked with health and hygiene education. The Board endorsed the report on recent UNICEF activities in Africa. Many delegations spoke in support of the increased aid to Africa. Major emphasis was given to linking emergency responses with ongoing UNICEF programs. The Board approved new multi-year commitments from general resources totalling $303,053,422 for 28 country and interregional programs and noted 32 projects totaling $223,215,000 to be funded from specific-purpose contributions. The Board stressed the importance of ensuring that child survival and development actions were integrated with continuing efforts in other of UNICEF action. The Board approved a commitment of $252,550,443 for the budget for the biennium 1986-87.
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  7. 7
    031969

    China: report of Mission on Needs Assessment for Population Assistance.

    United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 1984 May. xii, 156 p. (Report No. 67)

    A Needs Assessment and Program Development Mission visited the People's Republic of China from March 7 to April 16, 1983 to: review and analyze the country's population situation within the context of national population goals as well as population related development objectives, strategies, and programs; make recommendations on the future orientation and scope of national objectives and programs for strengthening or establishing new objectives, strategies, and programs; and make recommendations on program areas in need of external assistance within the framework of the recommended national population program and for geographical areas. This report summarizes the needs and recommendations in regard to: population policies and policy-related research; demographic research and training; basic population data collection and analysis; maternal and child health and family planning services; management training support for family planning services; logistics of contraceptive supply; management information system; family planning communication and education; family planning program research and evaluation; contraceptive production; research in human reproduction and contraceptives; population education and dissemination of population information; and special groups and multisectoral activities. The report also presents information on the national setting (geographical and cultural features, government and administration, the economy, and the evolution of socioeconomic development planning) and demographic features (population size, characteristics, and distribution, nationwide and demographic characteristics in geographical core areas). Based on its assessment of needs, the Mission identified mjaor priorities for assistance in the population field. Because of China's size and vast needs, external assistance for population programs would be diluted if provided to all provincial and lower administrative levels. Thus, the Mission suggests that a substantial portion of available resources be concentrated in 3 provinces as core areas: Sichuan, the most populous province (100,220,000 people by the end of 1982); Guandong, the province with the highest birthrate (25/1000); and Jiangsu, the most densely populated province (608 persons/square kilometer. In all the government has identified 11 provinces needing special attention in the next few years: Anhui, Hebei, Henan, Hubei, Hunan, Jilin, Shaanxi and Shandong, in addition to Guangdong, Jiangsu, and Sichuan.
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  8. 8
    267335

    [Statement by Dr. Pacoal Manuel Mocumbi, Ministry of Health, Chief of the Delegation of Mozambique, given at the International Conference on Population] Intervention du Dr. Pacoal Manuel Mocumbi, Ministre de la Sante, Chef de la Delegation de la republique Populaire du Mozambique a la Conferencie Internacionale de Population-Mexico, 6-13, aout.

    Mozambique. Ministerio da Saude

    [Unpublished] 1984. Presented at the International Conference on Population held in Mexico City, August 6-13, 1984. 10 p.

    In this speech the health miniter of Mozambique reviews his country's population situation during the decade since the 1st Population Conference at Bucharest. He emphasizes that in 1975, year of independence for Mozambique, the country had 10.5 million inhabitants, with a low average life expectancy (41.1 years), a high total fertility rate (6.6 children/woman) and a literacy level that was quite low with 93% of the population illiterate. In addition to poor socioeconomic conditions, the country has undergone political and natural disasters (e.g. war and drought) during the past 10 years. At the same time, the population's growth rate has continued to increase. Efforts to improve living standards include giving priority attention to education, health and housing. The adult illiteracy rate has fallen from 93% in 1975 to 72% in 1980. During the same period, a fourfold increase in the number of schools has been achieved. In the health field, primary health care and community participation efforts have succeeded at the implementation of immunization campaings and at the extension of health centers to rural areas. An important argument made here concerns peace as an essential requisite for development and the betterment of living standards. Recognized as serious factors facing developing countries in general, are imported inflation, paternalistic measures and policies, a deterioration of exchange relations, a worsening of taxes, and the balanne of trade deficits. It is in the context of these socioeconomic pressures that population issues become alarming. The government of Mozambique views population problems in the context of overall national development. A number of ongoing research projects for data collection and analysis are mentioned. Finally, the role of international agencies in promoting and financing development efforts is praised.
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