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    187190

    Care, women and AIDS. Media backgrounder.

    Global Coalition on Women and AIDS; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2004 Feb 2. [2] p.

    All over the world women are expected to take the lead in domestic work and in providing care to family members. HIV and AIDS have significantly increased the care burden for many women. Poverty and poor public services have also combined with AIDS to turn the care burden for women into a crisis with far-reaching social, health and economic consequences. The term 'care economy' is sometimes used to describe the many tasks carded out mostly by women and girls at home such as cooking, cleaning, fetching water and many other activities associated with caring for the young, sick and elderly in the household. The value of the time, energy and resources required to perform this unpaid work is hardly recognized and accounted for, despite its critical contribution to the overall economy and society in general. Women and girls pay an opportunity cost when undertaking unpaid care work for HIV and AIDS-related illnesses since their ability to participate in income generation, education, and skills building diminish. AIDS intensifies the feminization of poverty, particularly in hard-hit countries, and disempowers women. Entire families are also affected as vulnerability increases when women's time caring for the sick is taken away from other productive tasks within the household. (excerpt)
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