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  1. 1
    062173

    A demographic perspective on developing Asia and its relevance to the Bank.

    Pernia EM

    Manila, Philippines, Asian Development Bank, Economics Office, 1987 May. 28 p. (Economics Office Report Series No. 40)

    Even though population growth rates continue to decline in developing member countries (DMCs) of the Asian Development Bank, they will experience absolute population increases larger than those in the past. More importantly, the labor force continues to grow and absolute increases will be greater than any other time in history. Family planning education and access to contraceptives have contributed to the decline in population growth rates, but nothing can presently be done to decrease the rates of increase of the labor force because the people have already been born. Since most of the DMSs' populations are growing at 2% or more/year, much needed economic growth is delayed. For example, for any country with a growing population to maintain the amount of capital/person, it must spread capital. Yet the faster the population grows the lesser the chances for increasing that amount. The Bank's short to medium term development policy should include loans for projects that will generate employment using capital widening and deepening and that develop rural areas, such as employment in small industries, to prevent urban migration. Other projects that engulf this policy are those concerning primary, secondary and adult education; health; food supply; and housing and infrastructure. The long term development policy must bolster population programs in DMCs so as to reduce the growth of the economically active segment of the population in the 21st century. In addition, the Bank should address fertility issues as more and more women join the work force. The Bank can play a major role in Asian development by considering the indirect demographic and human resource impacts of each project.
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  2. 2
    046408

    Project agreement between the Employers Confederation of the Philippines (ECOP) and ILO/Labour and Population Team for Asia and the Pacific (LAPTAP).

    Employers Confederation of the Philippines [ECOP]; International Labour Office [ILO]. Labour and Population Team for Asia and the Pacific [LAPTAP]

    [Unpublished] 1987. [29] p. (Project No. PHI/87/EO1)

    This project agreement between the Employers Confederation of the Philippines (ECOP) and the International Labor Organization (ILO)/Labor and Population Team for Asia and the Pacific (LAPTAP) continues support to the Population Unit of ECOP for an additional 2 years (July 1987-89). Economic uncertainties in the Philippines resulting from the past period of political turmoil necessitated this extension in ILO funding. After 1989, ECOP will absorb the population education officer into its regular staff. Continued funding of the ECOP program is based on several favorable factors, including the evident commitment of the ECOP directors to population activities, contact made with individual employers and business associations since 1985, and the production high-quality IEC materials. The long-term objective of this project is to promote smaller families through educational and motivational programs that emphasize the close relationship of family planning and living standards and to link such activities with existing health services at the plant level. Specific objectives are to disseminate information on family planning and family welfare to workers and to educate employers in the industrial sector about the relevance of family planning to labor force development. Project activities will include monthly seminars for employers and meetings with member associations of ECOP.
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  3. 3
    031969

    China: report of Mission on Needs Assessment for Population Assistance.

    United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 1984 May. xii, 156 p. (Report No. 67)

    A Needs Assessment and Program Development Mission visited the People's Republic of China from March 7 to April 16, 1983 to: review and analyze the country's population situation within the context of national population goals as well as population related development objectives, strategies, and programs; make recommendations on the future orientation and scope of national objectives and programs for strengthening or establishing new objectives, strategies, and programs; and make recommendations on program areas in need of external assistance within the framework of the recommended national population program and for geographical areas. This report summarizes the needs and recommendations in regard to: population policies and policy-related research; demographic research and training; basic population data collection and analysis; maternal and child health and family planning services; management training support for family planning services; logistics of contraceptive supply; management information system; family planning communication and education; family planning program research and evaluation; contraceptive production; research in human reproduction and contraceptives; population education and dissemination of population information; and special groups and multisectoral activities. The report also presents information on the national setting (geographical and cultural features, government and administration, the economy, and the evolution of socioeconomic development planning) and demographic features (population size, characteristics, and distribution, nationwide and demographic characteristics in geographical core areas). Based on its assessment of needs, the Mission identified mjaor priorities for assistance in the population field. Because of China's size and vast needs, external assistance for population programs would be diluted if provided to all provincial and lower administrative levels. Thus, the Mission suggests that a substantial portion of available resources be concentrated in 3 provinces as core areas: Sichuan, the most populous province (100,220,000 people by the end of 1982); Guandong, the province with the highest birthrate (25/1000); and Jiangsu, the most densely populated province (608 persons/square kilometer. In all the government has identified 11 provinces needing special attention in the next few years: Anhui, Hebei, Henan, Hubei, Hunan, Jilin, Shaanxi and Shandong, in addition to Guangdong, Jiangsu, and Sichuan.
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  4. 4
    034566

    Annual report 1983.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Western Hemisphere Region [WHR]

    New York, New York, IPPF, [1983]. [32] p.

    This Annual Report 1983 of the Western Hemisphere Region International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) presents a selection of activities of all 43 associations. The annual meeting of the Western Hemisphere Regional Council offered a striking contrast to the 1st meeting in 1953. In 1983, the total regional enterprise contained some 3500 paid employees and even larger number of active volunteers. It involved large numbers of cooperating physicians, the direct participation of universities, hospitals, and other community institutions, and had the support of thousands of community distributors. These were people operating a total of 2044 clinics and 11,894 community distribution posts. Their messages went out through press, raido, and television and reached 3/4 of the Hemisphere's population. The comparison of the 2 meetings 30 years apart testifies to the successes realized by the associations in the Western Hemisphere. Their accomplishments serve to reveal the full measure of the task they set for themselves. This was to demonstrate that family planning is the strongest single correlate of family health. It was to establish family planning as a human right and to show that the practice of family planning helps to develop attitudes of mind in which people reassert control over their lives. Yet the full task calls for constantly new approaches in which success has not yet been won. This report comments on a number of these, of which the following are a partial list: the integration of family planning with other development strategies, including broad-scale community development; the addition to family planning of other elements of primary health care; the incorporation into family planning programs of a direct attack on infant mortality through vaccinations, oral rehydration therapy, and the promotion of breastfeeding; a renewed emphasis on the advancement of women; and the elaboration of fresh approaches to national leadership. Success is always partial, yet it can lead to the mistaken idea that the ultimate answers have been found. The family planning associations in Latin America and the Caribbean have had to pay a price for their achievements -- in complacencies on the part of international donors and official sectors that have come to see the Region's population problems as essentially "solved." On the other hand, the regional network is firmly established and subject to a constant review that seeks to improve service delivery. The trend toward program integration directs the associations toward new and challenging activities.
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