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  1. 1
    650525

    Neuroendocrinology and reproduction in the human.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Scientific Group

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 1965. 19 p. (WHO Technical Report Series No. 304)

    This WHO technical report focuses on the 1) psychosomatic factors in human reproduction; 2) hypothalamo-hypophyseal system; 3) mechanism of sexual rhythm; 4) nervous influences on the hypothalamus; 5) hormonal influences on the hypothalamus; 6) neuroendocrine aspects of sexual behavior; and 7) effects of drugs on reproduction. After summarizing current research status on the above-mentioned topics, the following research needs are suggested: 1) assays of individual human endogenous gonadotropins, suitable for clinical application; 2) autoradiography, fluorescent-antibody, spectrophometric interference and histochemical and biochemical techniques for studying cells that supply axons to the primary capillary plexus of the hypophyseal portal system and for studying effects of different hormonal status on hypothalmic structure and function; 3) computer techniques for evaluating electrophysiological data; 4) improved lesioning techniques; 5) comparative studies of reproductive activity patterns, exteroceptive factors, neuroendocrine factors in sexual and related social behavior, and long-term or delayed effects of drugs administered during gestation on subsequent sexual development; 6) studies of synaptic connections of hypothalamic neurones; 7) studies of endogenous gonadal and gonadotropin production in prepuberal animals; 8) functional significance of regional distribution of hypophyseal portal system; 9) mechanisms involved in selective uptake of labeled hormones; 10) hypothalamic lesions in species with spontaneous ovulation and active luteal function; 11) direct effect of gonadal hormones on single hypothalamic neurones studied with combination of microinjection and unit recording devices; 12) studies of the possibility of a direct feedback of gonadotropic hormones on the hypothalamus; 13) studies of the receptor mechanisms involved in neuroendocrine reflexes; 14) wider exploration of brain structures, with regard to feedback action of gonadal hormones; 15) studies of pineal function; 16) further investigation of a possible role of the peripheral autonomic pathways in reproductive processes; and 17) research on the application of tissue culture techniques for studying problems of the origin and metabolic effects of neurohormonal mediators and the biochemcial and morphological changes induced by sex hormones.
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  2. 2
    753743

    An overview of research approaches to the control of male fertility.

    Perry MI; Speidel JJ; Winter JN

    In: Sciarra, J.J., Markland, C. and Speidel, J.J., eds. Control of male fertility. (Proceedings of a Workshop on the Control of Male Fertility, San Francisco, June 19-21, 1974). Hagerstown, Maryland, Harper and Row, 1975. p. 274-307

    Literature on research approaches to permanent and relatively reversible methods of male fertility control is reviewed. Sources and expenditures for research into male fertility control are noted. Permanent methods discussed include electrocautery of the vas, transcutaneous interruption of the vas, vasectomy clips, chemical occlusion of the vas, and passive immunization. Reversible methods reviewed include vasovasotomy, intravasal plugs, and vas valves. Current research into animal models, reversibility after vas occlusion, nonocclusive surgical techniques, pharmacological alteration of male reproductive function, including adrenergic blocking agents, steroidal compounds, inhibitors of gonadotropin secretion, clomiphene citrate, organosiloxanes, prostaglandins, alpha-chlorohydrin, heterocyclic agents, and alkylating agents, and delivery systems for antifertility agents is discussed. Research into semen storage and improved condoms is also reviewed. As a relatively low proportion of funds are committed to research in male fertility control, a greater investment in applied and clinical research is warranted.
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