Your search found 8 Results

  1. 1
    318979

    Hormonal contraception and bone health.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, Department of Reproductive Health and Research, 2007. [2] p. (Provider Brief)

    Hormonal contraceptives, which include birth control pills, injections, implants, the patch and the vaginal ring, all use hormones to keep a woman from getting pregnant. These hormones can have other health effects for women, many of them beneficial, besides just preventing pregnancy. However, some questions have been raised about how particular hormonal contraceptives, DMPA (depot medroxyprogesterone acetate with trade names of Depo-Provera, Depo-Clinovir and others) and NET-EN (norethisterone enantate or Noristerat, Norigest, Doryxas and others), may affect the health of women's bone. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    028741
    Peer Reviewed

    Effects of hormonal contraceptives on milk volume and infant growth.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction. Task Force on Oral Contraceptives

    Contraception. 1984 Dec; 30(6):505-22.

    The World Health Organization (WHO) conducted a randomized comparative trail of th effects of hormonal contrception on milk volume and infant growth. The 341 study participants, drawn from 3 obstetric centers in Hungary and Thailand, were 20-35 years of age with 2-4 live births and previous successful experience with breastfeeding. Subjects who chose oral contraception (OC) were randomly allocated to a combined preparation containing 150 mcg levonorgestrel and 30 mcg ethinyl estradiol (N=86) or to a progestin-only minipill containing 75 mcg dl-norgestrel (N=8). 59 Thai women receiving 150 mg depot medroxyprogesterone (DPMA) intramuscularly every 3 months were also studied. An additional 111 women who were using nonhormonal methods of contraception or no contraception served as controls. Milk volume was determined by breast pump expression. No significant differences in average milk volume were noted between treatment groups at the 6 week baseline visit. However, between the 6th and 24th weeks, average milk volume in the combined OC group declined by 41.9%, which was significantly greater than the declines of 12.0% noted in the progestin-only group, 6.1% among DMPA users, and 16.7% among controls. The lower expressed milk volume among combined OC users did not impair infant growth. No significant differences were observed between treatment groups in terms of average infant body weight or rate or weight gain. Users of combined OCs may have compensated for their decreased milk volume by providing more extensive supplementary feeding or more prolonged suckling episodes. These results suggest that the estrogen content of combined OCs adversely affects the capacity of the breast to produce milk; thus, family planning programs should make nonestrogen-containing methods available to breastfeeding mothers. Although no effects on infant growth were noted in this study, the possibility of such efects cannot be excluded in populations where infant growth largely depends on the adequacy of unsupplemente d lactation.
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  3. 3
    114428

    [Oral contraceptives: APF takes a position] Contraceptivos orais: APF toma posicao.

    SEXUALIDADE E PLANEAMENTO FAMILIAR. 1995 Jul-Sep; (7):17-8.

    The Portuguese Association of Family Planning has learned about a study of the World Health Organization that associated certain types of combined oral contraceptives (OCs) with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, notably deep venous thrombosis. The position of the International Medical Advisory Panel (IMAP) of the IPPF, however, was that such conclusions were not definitive and new studies should be conducted to confirm or refute these conclusions. Furthermore, since the risk is rare, those using OCs should have regular medical examinations. For the majority of OC users the benefits outweigh the risks. The author of one of the two studies that hinted at the cardiovascular risks of third-generation progestagens stated that the British authorities incorrectly interpreted the data, which were preliminary. In fact, these data suggest that the new generation of OCs protects against cardiac attack and associated mortality. Even the WHO took the position that these results should be confirmed by independent studies. The polemic mounted when the British authorities issued an alert about the possible negative effects of seven types of OCs containing progestagens which putatively doubled the risk of venous thrombosis. This was based on the findings of three studies: two of them were incomplete, one was done at the initiative of the WHO, one was carried out in Europe, and the third one was done in the UK. At the meeting of the Committee of Pharmaceutical Specialties of the European Agency of Medicaments in October 1995 in London the position was taken that it is not appropriate to withdraw such OCs; investigators should analyze these data in depth and perform new studies; the three companies that manufacture such OCs should submit more information by the end of 1995; and physicians should take into account thromboembolic risk factors when prescribing such OCs.
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  4. 4
    050472
    Peer Reviewed

    The analysis of menstrual bleeding patterns: a review.

    Belsey EM; Farley TM

    CONTRACEPTION. 1988 Aug; 38(2):129-56.

    Methods of analyzing vaginal bleeding patterns, both of normally menstruating non-contracepting and contracepting women, are reviewed, and the reference period method is described in greater detail. For women using long-acting hormonal methods, the concept of cycle is no longer appropriate. The reference period method adopts the woman as the unit of analysis, divides her menstrual diary into consecutive periods, and summarizes vaginal bleeding patterns within each period. Data are presented in bar plots showing median length of bleeding, 5th and 95th percentiles, means and standard deviations. Natural, oral contraceptive, and IUD patterns are similar, while 3-monthly injections, vaginal rings and minipill patterns are disrupted patterns with no notion of cyclicity. Dealing with events that overlap reference period boundaries is still a problem, and is still being studied by working groups, in particular at WHO and the University of Exeter. For example, the effects of different definitions have not yet been systematically evaluated, and recommendations have not been tested empirically. The WHO has published a set of data on 4817 women's diaries to stimulate statistical research on this topic.
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  5. 5
    051094

    Effective interception with the levonorgestrel-20-IUD contrarily to WHO advocated Lng-2-microdose IUD. Reply to letter to the editor [letter]

    Barzelatto J

    CONTRACEPTION. 1988 Jun; 37(6):644-6.

    This letter is a response to Professor Haspels' letter criticizing the World Health Organization Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction's clinical study of a 20 mcg microdose levonorgestrel IUD for Contraception (Contraception 1987;35: 363-79). The Population Council's International Committee for Contraceptive Research was provided with the results of the study prior to publication. The feasibility of an IUD that released a dose of progestational steroid that was pharmacologically active only on the endometrium was confirmed in a study conducted between 1980-1982 in 7 centers, only 3 of which were in developing countries. There was no evidence of effects on ovulation and no ectopic pregnancies in this study. The study itself resulted in only 8 ectopic pregnancies (6 with the levonorgestrel device and 2 with copper devices) out of 17,064 woman-years of experience. Nevertheless, the study was terminated and the results published. The polymeric delivery system used in the 2 mcg levonorgestrel IUD had undergone extensive animal toxicological studies in the US and the UK before human use. Moreover, the ethical acceptability of the study was approved by the World Health Organization as well as by local institutional ethic committees and appropriate national authorities.
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  6. 6
    208344

    Once-a-month injectable contraceptives.

    Hall PE

    IPPF MEDICAL BULLETIN. 1987 Apr; 21(2):1-2.

    Within the past 25 years, steroidal preparations have become available that allow the user contraceptive protection over extended periods of time. There are only 2 injectable preparations presently used at all widely within family planning programs throughout the world: 1) depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA), and 2) norethisterone enanthate (NET-EN). 1 of the major side effects of progestagen-only contraception has been disruption of normal menstrual bleeding, giving rise to both irregular bleeding and amenorrhea. Several extensive reports on the clinical use of monthly injectables appeared in 1970, but few studies have been reported subsequently. In response to the demand from certain populations to have safe, well-investigated, once-a-month injectable contraceptives with high efficacy and little menstrual bleeding disturbance, the World Health Organization's (WHO) Special Programme of Research in Human Reproduction developed a strategy for the development of a once-a-month contraceptive which involves: 1) the assessment of use-effectiveness and side-effects of HRP102 (NET-EN, 50 mg., plus oestradiol valerate, 5 mg) and Clyloprovera (DMPA, 25 mg., plus estradiol cypionate, 5 mg.); and 2) the optimum improvement of these 2 combined formulas by reduction of the progestagen content. Results from a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic study show that many of the women receiving reduced progestagen dose preparations ovulated during the 3rd treatment month; thus the 2 original preparations, Cycloprovera and HRP102 appear to be the optimal formulations for these combinations of steroids. Plans are being developed to make 1 or both of these available for introduction into certain family planning programs in developing countries early in 1988.
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  7. 7
    795766

    International fertility research program sponsors effort in 43 lands to develop new, safer methods.

    International Family Planning Perspectives. 1979 Sep; 5(3):127-9.

    The International Fertility Research Program (IFRP) is sponsoring research in 30 developing countries and 13 developed nations in an effort to develop more effective contraceptive methods. Particular emphasis is being placed on developing contraceptives for women in developing countries where nutritional, health, and sanitation conditions make current methods either difficult or less effective to use. Trials of a pill regimen including vitamin supplementation are underway in Sri Lanka, and a progestogen-only pill for use by lactating women is being tested in Egypt and India. Progestogens apparently do not modify the content of maternal milk. Another study involves the testing of a Lippes loop which releases Trasylol, a bleeding suppressant, in an effort to overcome bleeding problems associated with IUD use. The IFRP has developed and is testing biodegradable appendages which can be attached to IUDs to help retain the device in postpartum women during the period when the uterus is enlarged. Other efforts are being directed toward improving and simplifying sterilization procedures. In Chile, pellets of quinacrine have been inserted into the upper area of the uterus. As the pellets dissolve the quinacrine enters the tubes and produces scar tissue which eventually closes the tube. This research may pave the way toward the development of a non-surgical sterilization method. Animal studies of a reversible sterilization procedure in which a condom-like device is fitted over the ends of the tubes are in progress. In another project a modified laparoscope, called the Laprocator, is being evaluated. The device does not use electricity and is particularly suitable for use in areas in which electricity is lacking or the source is unstable. The device is used in a procedure called suprapubic endoscopy in which only a small incision is needed. Insufflation of the abdomen is unnecessary, and elastic rings are used to close the tubes. IFRP will undertake an innovative motivational project in the Middle East during the coming religious holidays.
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  8. 8
    776174

    Low doses of gestagens as fertility regulating agents.

    FOTHERBY K

    In: Diczfalusy, E., ed. Regulation of human fertility. (Proceedings of the WHO Symposium on Advances in Fertility Regulation, Moscow, USSR, November 16-19, 1976) Copenhagen, Denmark, Scriptor, 1977. p. 283-321

    This review of low-dose gestagen contraception emphasizes the variety of findings from different studies. For example, studies of chlormadinone acetate have found pregnancy rates of 1.1-12/100 woman-years. Results of trials of megestrol acetate suggested that a 500-mcg dose level yielded unacceptable pregnancy rates. No significant difference between various doses of norgestrel which have been studied were found (e.g., 50 and 75 mcg daily of dl-norgestrel or 30 mcg daily of the d-isomer). Pregnancy rate reported for most trials with this gestagen and also norethisterone and quingestanol were within an acceptable range. With 1 exception, pregnancy rates reported in trials of lynestrenol were remarkable low. Cumulative results of trials with various gestagens show Pearl Index rates between 2 and 3, except for lynestrenol. Dose level was the critical variable; i.e., it must be sufficiently high to exert antifertility action and low enough to avoid a high incidence of irregular bleeding. Apart from menstrual irregularities, other side effects from the minipill seem minor and in general less severe than those encountered with combined oral contraceptives.
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