Your search found 69 Results

  1. 1
    391126
    Peer Reviewed

    Shortages of benzathine penicillin for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of syphilis: An evaluation from multi-country surveys and stakeholder interviews.

    Nurse-Findlay S; Taylor MM; Savage M; Mello MB; Saliyou S; Lavayen M; Seghers F; Campbell ML; Birgirimana F; Ouedraogo L; Newman Owiredu M; Kidula N; Pyne-Mercier L

    PLoS Medicine. 2017 Dec; 14(12):e1002473.

    BACKGROUND: Benzathine penicillin G (BPG) is the only recommended treatment to prevent mother-to-child transmission of syphilis. Due to recent reports of country-level shortages of BPG, an evaluation was undertaken to quantify countries that have experienced shortages in the past 2 years and to describe factors contributing to these shortages. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Country-level data about BPG shortages were collected using 3 survey approaches. First, a survey designed by the WHO Department of Reproductive Health and Research was distributed to 41 countries and territories in the Americas and 41 more in Africa. Second, WHO conducted an email survey of 28 US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention country directors. An additional 13 countries were in contact with WHO for related congenital syphilis prevention activities and also reported on BPG shortages. Third, the Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI) collected data from 14 countries (where it has active operations) to understand the extent of stock-outs, in-country purchasing, usage behavior, and breadth of available purchasing options to identify stock-outs worldwide. CHAI also conducted in-person interviews in the same 14 countries to understand the extent of stock-outs, in-country purchasing and usage behavior, and available purchasing options. CHAI also completed a desk review of 10 additional high-income countries, which were also included. BPG shortages were attributable to shortfalls in supply, demand, and procurement in the countries assessed. This assessment should not be considered globally representative as countries not surveyed may also have experienced BPG shortages. Country contacts may not have been aware of BPG shortages when surveyed or may have underreported medication substitutions due to desirability bias. Funding for the purchase of BPG by countries was not evaluated. In all, 114 countries and territories were approached to provide information on BPG shortages occurring during 2014-2016. Of unique countries and territories, 95 (83%) responded or had information evaluable from public records. Of these 95 countries and territories, 39 (41%) reported a BPG shortage, and 56 (59%) reported no BPG shortage; 10 (12%) countries with and without BPG shortages reported use of antibiotic alternatives to BPG for treatment of maternal syphilis. Market exits, inflexible production cycles, and minimum order quantities affect BPG supply. On the demand side, inaccurate forecasts and sole sourcing lead to under-procurement. Clinicians may also incorrectly prescribe BPG substitutes due to misperceptions of quality or of the likelihood of adverse outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Targets for improvement include drug forecasting and procurement, and addressing provider reluctance to use BPG. Opportunities to improve global supply, demand, and use of BPG should be prioritized alongside congenital syphilis elimination efforts.
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  2. 2
    323933

    Monitoring human rights in contraceptive services and programmes.

    Gruskin S; Kumar S; Nicholson A; Ali M; Khosla R

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2017. 73 p.

    This tool for Monitoring human rights in contraceptive services and programmes contributes to the World Health Organization’s (WHO’s) ongoing work on rights-based contraceptive programmes. This work builds directly on WHO’s 2014 Ensuring human rights within contraceptive programmes: a human rights analysis of existing quantitative indicators and the 2015 publication Ensuring human rights within contraceptive service delivery implementation guide by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and WHO. This tool is intended for use by countries to assist them in strengthening their human rights efforts in contraceptive programming. The tool uses existing commonly-used indicators to highlight areas where human rights have been promoted, neglected or violated in contraceptive programming; gaps in programming and in data collection; and opportunities for action within the health sector and beyond, including opportunities for partnership initiatives.
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  3. 3
    374584

    Contraceptives and condoms for family planning and STI & HIV prevention external procurement support report.

    Ahmed K; Sarker S

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 2014 Dec. 86 p.

    Access to reproductive health, including family planning, is recognized as a human right. Support from donors is critical to improving and ensuring the security of essential contraceptives and other life-saving reproductive health commodities. Contraceptives procured through external support constitute a significant contribution to reproductive health, including family planning and, through the dual protection provided by condoms, the prevention of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV. This report, updated annually, is a rich source of data for development that can drive good planning for contraceptive supply, advocacy and resource mobilization. The report contains dozens of figures, tables, and graphs, along with information and analysis that can influence policy dialogue, advocacy and interagency work. It aims to enhance coordination among donors, improve partnerships between donors and national governments, and mobilize the resources needed to accelerate progress towards universal access to sexual and reproductive health, and in particular to reduce the unmet need for family planning. The report also analyses data received from individual donors and partner organizations about the support they have provided directly to developing countries for the procurement of contraceptives and condoms.
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  4. 4
    374435

    Pakistan. Spotlight on family planning: tracking progress on the FP2020 pledges.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]; Family Planning Association of Pakistan [FPAP]

    [London, United Kingdom, IPPF, 2015]. 2 p.

    Rahnuma, Family Planning Association of Pakistan (Rahnuma-FPAP, the IPPF Member Association in Pakistan) and other civil society organizations (CSOs) have identified a number of ‘high priority’ pledges: progress towards these pledges is critical for increasing access to modern family planning (FP) methods. Civil society calls on the government to: Demonstrate political commitment to deliver the FP2020 pledges. To date, there has been slow progress on all family planning indicators due to inadequate financial commitments and ownership by governments and government ministries; Allocate government funding to family planning at the provincial level. Budgets are a responsibility of provincial governments, due to devolution; Invest in effective procurement and logistics systems for family planning to ensure commodity security and address unmet need for family planning, including unmet need for long-acting reversible contraceptives. In the absence of a functioning supply chain, unmet need will increase.
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  5. 5
    375409

    Caring for newborns and children in the community. Planning handbook for programme managers and planners.

    Marsh D; Shirey PW

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization, Department of Maternal, Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health, 2015. 168 p.

    Prevention and treatment services need to be brought closer to children who are not adequately reached by the health system. To help meet this need, WHO and UNICEF have developed state-of-the-art packages to enable community health workers to care for pregnant women, newborns and children. Caring for Newborns and Children in the Community comprises three packages of materials for training and support of CHWs. Countries will assess their current community-based services and choose to what extent they are able to implement these packages for improving child and maternal health and survival: (1) Caring for the newborn at home, (2) caring for the child's healthy growth and development, (3) caring for the sick child in the community.
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  6. 6
    375328

    Guide to introducing HPV vaccine into national immunization programmes.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Immunization, Vaccines and Biologicals. Expanded Programme on Immunization [EPI]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, EPI, 2016. 104 p.

    This document is intended for use by national immunization programme managers and immunization partners to inform the policy discussions and operational aspects for the introduction of HPV vaccine into national immunization programmes and to provide up-to-date references on the global policy, as well as the technical and strategic issues related to the introduction of HPV vaccine.
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  7. 7
    372761

    Evaluation of the UNFPA support to family planning 2008-2013. Volume 1.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, Evaluation Office, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 2016 Apr. 105 p.

    The purpose of the evaluation was to assess the performance of UNFPA in the field of family planning during the period covered by the Strategic Plan 2008-2013 and to provide learning to inform the implementation of the current UNFPA Family Planning Strategy Choices not chance (2012-2020). The evaluation provided an overall independent assessment of UNFPA interventions in the area of family planning and identified key lessons learned for the current and future strategies. The particular emphasis of this evaluation was on learning with a view to informing the implementation of the UNFPA family planning strategy Choices not chance 2012-2020, as well as other related interventions and programmes, such as the Global Programme to Enhance Reproductive Health Commodity Security (GPRHCS- 2013-2020). The evaluation constituted an important contribution to the mid-term review of UNFPA strategic plan 2014-2017. The evaluation features five country case study reports: Bolivia, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Ethiopia, and Zimbabwe.
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  8. 8
    335790

    Principles and considerations for adding a vaccine to a national immunization programme: From decision to implementation and monitoring.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Immunization, Vaccines and Biologicals. Expanded Programme on Immunization [EPI]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, EPI, 2014. [140] p.

    This essential resource document reviews the principles and issues to be considered when making decisions about, planning, and implementing the introduction of a vaccine into a national immunization programme. Importantly, the document highlights ways to use the opportunity provided by the vaccine introduction to strengthen immunization and health systems. The comprehensive guidance also describes the latest references and tools related to vaccine decision-making, economic analyses, cold chain, integrated disease control and health promotion, vaccine safety, communications, monitoring, and more, and provides key URL links to many of these resources.
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  9. 9
    335183

    Key performance indicators strengthen procurement in Latin America.

    John Snow [JSI]. DELIVER

    Arlington, Virginia, JSI, DELIVER, 2013 Jan. [7] p.

    This brief describes the evolution of contraceptive procurement in the Latin America and Caribbean (LAC) region, highlighting how LAC countries monitored and evaluated key data when making performance improvements. By introducing and monitoring key indicators, they were able to smooth the procurement process and improve procurement performance.
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  10. 10
    358772

    Male latex condom specification, prequalification and guidelines for procurement, 2010.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]; United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]; Family Health International [FHI]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2010. 152 p.

    Consistent and correct use of condoms is vital to achieve the level of protection required to prevent unintended pregnancy and the transmission of HIV and other STIs. Another vital factor is the quality of the product. If condoms leak or break, they cannot offer adequate protection. In many programmes attention tends to be focused on the condom user and the promotion of condoms. Often, inadequate attention is paid to ensuring, as a key component of a comprehensive condom programming strategy, that a quality product is manufactured, purchased, stored, distributed and handled properly. The male latex condom is an important medical device, and its manufacture needs to be regulated and controlled as such.This document describes a technically sound, systematic process to support the manufacture, prequalification, procurement and distribution of a quality product that can meet the needs of different populations in a broad spectrum of challenging environmental conditions. It is intended primarily for any policy-maker, manager or procurement officer who has the responsibility for procuring, supplying and promoting natural latex male condoms.
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  11. 11
    334036

    World Health Organization's 2010 recommendations for HIV treatment: Natiional guideline revision challenges and lessons learned.

    Rossi V; Ojikutu B; Hirschhorn L

    Arlington, Virginia, John Snow [JSI], AIDS Support and Technical Assistance Resources [AIDSTAR-One], 2012 Feb. [26] p. (Technical Brief; USAID Contract No. GHH-I-00–07–00059–00)

    In 2010, the World Health Organization released revised recommendations for adult and adolescent HIV treatment. This technical brief provides HIV policy makers and program managers with a point of reference as they adapt and implement revised national HIV treatment guidelines. Approaches that worked well, challenges and lessons learned from Sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America, and South-East Asia are highlighted. Links to key resources for countries revising guidelines and implementing revisions are also provided.
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  12. 12
    351257
    Peer Reviewed

    Factors affecting compliance with measles vaccination in Lao PDR.

    Phimmasane M; Douangmala S; Koffi P; Reinharz D; Buisson Y

    Vaccine. 2010 Sep 24; 28(41):6723-9.

    In line with WHO objectives, the Lao Government is committed to eliminate measles by 2012. Yet from 1992 to 2007, the annual incidence of measles remained high while the vaccination coverage showed a wide diversity across provinces. A descriptive study was performed to determine factors affecting compliance with vaccination against measles, which included qualitative and quantitative components. The qualitative study used a convenience sample of 13 persons in charge of the vaccination program, consisting of officials from different levels of the health care structure and members of vaccination teams. The quantitative study performed on the target population consisted of a matched, case-control survey conducted on a stratified random sample of parents of children aged 9-23 months. Overall, 584 individuals (292 cases and 292 controls) were interviewed in the three provinces selected because of low vaccination coverage. On the provision of services side (supply), the main problems identified were a lack of vaccine supply and diluent, a difficulty in maintaining the cold chain, a lack of availability and competence among health workers, a lack of coordination and a limited capacity to assess needs and make coherent decisions. In the side of the consumer (demand), major obstacles identified were poor knowledge about measles immunization and difficulties in accessing vaccination centers because of distance and cost. In multivariate analysis, a low education level of the father was a factor of non-immunization while the factors of good compliance were high incomes, spacing of pregnancies, a feeling that children must be vaccinated, knowledge about immunization age, presenting oneself to the hospital rather than expecting the mobile vaccination teams and last, immunization of other family members or friends' children. The main factors affecting the compliance with vaccination against measles in Laos involve both the supply side and the demand side. Obtaining an effective coverage requires upgrading and training the Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) staff and a reinforcement of health education for target populations in all provinces. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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  13. 13
    332957

    The USAID | DELIVER project improves patient access to essential medicines in Zambia. Success story.

    John Snow [JSI]. DELIVER

    Arlington, Virginia, JSI, DELIVER, 2011 Feb. [2] p.

    Success story on a logistics system pilot project in Zambia that set out to cost-effectively improve the availability of lifesaving drugs and other essential products at health facilities.
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  14. 14
    332023

    State of the world's vaccines and immunization. 3rd ed.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; UNICEF; World Bank

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2009. [200] p.

    This edition of the State of the World's Vaccines and Immunization focuses on the major developments in vaccines and immunization since 2000. Part 1 (Chapters 1-5) examines the impact of immunization on efforts to meet the MDGs, especially the goal to reduce deaths among children under five. It looks at the development and use of vaccines and at the safeguards that have been put in place to ensure their safety, efficacy, and quality. It sets out the progress and challenges in meeting the immunization-related global goals, and looks at the cost of scaling up immunization coverage to meet these goals, and efforts to ensure that the achievements are sustainable in the long term. Finally, it looks beyond 2015 to likely changes in the immunization landscape. Part 2 focuses on over 20 vaccine-preventable diseases and reviews progress since 2000 in efforts to protect populations against these diseases through the use of vaccines. (Excerpt)
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  15. 15
    331968

    From advocacy to access: Bangladesh. 360 degrees advocacy: Strengthening a weak contraceptive supply chain in Bangladesh. Fact chart.

    Family Planning Association of Bangladesh; International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    London, England, IPPF, 2009 Nov. [2] p.

    In Bangladesh, the IPPF Member Association, the Family Planning Association of Bangladesh (FPAB), worked with the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare to improve the dysfunctional supply chain. Results to date include: The Ministry of Health reactivated the Logistical Coordination Forum, a donor, government and civil society led group, to identify and solve blockages in the supply chain; Capacity building and training for staff in the Logistics and Supply Unit were increased; The Ministry of Health and Family Welfare committed to using government resources to make up the shortfall from declining donor contributions.
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  16. 16
    331967

    From advocacy to access: Uganda. The power of networks: How do you mobilize funds for reproductive health supplies? Fact chart.

    Reproductive Health Uganda; International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    London, England, IPPF, 2009 Nov. [2] p.

    In Uganda the IPPF Member Association, Reproductive Health Uganda (RHU) coordinated civil society and mobilized advocates and champions to increase the availability of RH supplies and family planning. Results to date include: The Government of Uganda increased funding for RH supplies in the 2010 budget; The Government of Uganda disburses funds directly to the National Medical Stores on an annual basis enabling the bulk purchase of contraceptives; 30 out of 80 districts have committed to increasing their resource allocation for family planning and RH supplies.
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  17. 17
    331672

    Bangladesh: Government of Bangladesh Contraceptive Procurement Bottleneck Study. Full report.

    Dickens T

    Arlington, Virginia, John Snow [JSI], DELIVER, 2008 Aug. 81 p. (USAID Contract No. GPO-I-01-06-00007-00)

    In August 2008, Todd Dickens (PATH), with assistance from the USAID | DELIVER PROJECT, Task Order 1, conducted a review of the IDA-funded procurement of health care commodities under the Health, Nutrition, and Population Sector Program in Bangladesh. The study’s overall objective was to identify bottlenecks and problems that have lead to recent stockouts of contraceptives, and recommend possible actions that the Government of Bangladesh, USAID and development partners can take to address these problems that will improve the overall efficiency and effectiveness of the procurement process and support contraceptive security in Bangladesh.
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  18. 18
    331424

    Contraceptive procurement in Peru: diversifying suppliers.

    Lopez-Linares R

    Washington, D.C., Constella Futures, Health Policy Initiative, 2008 Nov. [23] p. (USAID Contract No. GPO-I-01-05-00040-00)

    This report describes how the Government of Peru was successful in diversifying its procurement options and mechanisms for contraceptive commodities. It shows the progress made between 1999, when Peru began purchasing contraceptive supplies with public funds, and mid-2007, when important changes were made in procurement channels. Today, the Peruvian government procures contraceptives from multiple national and international suppliers and is able to negotiate for favorable prices and other terms. (Author's abstract)
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  19. 19
    328537

    Procuring Single-Use Injection Equipment and Safety Boxes: A Practical Guide for Pharmacists, Physicians, Procurement Staff and Programme Managers

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Health Technology and Pharmaceuticals, Department of Blood Safety and Clinical Technology

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2003 May 5. (WHO/BCT/03.04)

    The objective of this guide is to accompany pharmacists, physicians, procurement staff and programme managers through the process of procuring single-use injection equipment and safety boxes of assured quality, on a national or international market, at reasonable prices. International organizations have established standardized procurement procedures for medicines and medical devices. This guide describes how these procedures can be used to ensure the procurement of injection equipment and safety boxes. Institutions procuring injection equipment need to develop a list of manufacturers that are prequalified on the basis of certain criteria which include international quality standards. This guide provides steps and tools for procurement, including a pre-qualification procedure of injection equipment for purchase. Developing a monitoring system for supplier performance will improve and safeguard the quality of injection equipment selected and prevent or eliminate unreliable suppliers.
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  20. 20
    327143

    Missing the Target No. 5: Improving AIDS drug access and advancing health care for all.

    International Treatment Preparedness Coalition [ITPC]

    [Bangkok, Thailand], ITPC, 2007 Dec. [114] p.

    In the first section of the report, nine country teams provide first-hand reports on central issues related to AIDS service scale-up in their countries. Each demonstrates that increasing access to AIDS treatment brings not only better life and new hope, but also shines light on challenges and effective approaches to a spectrum of health, poverty, and human rights issues. In part two of this report, 14 national teams review drug access issues, and find that global and national processes for AIDS drug registration are burdened by inefficiencies, duplications, delay, and, in some instances, corruption. In many cases key ARVs, particularly newer and second-line therapies, are not yet registered in high impact countries - an administrative roadblock that puts lifesaving care out of reach for hundreds of thousands of people. The report makes a number of concrete recommendations to the key players who are responsible for making near universal access to AIDS treatment a reality by 2010. (excerpt)
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  21. 21
    326779

    The World Bank's commitment to HIV / AIDS in Africa: Our agenda for action, 2007-2011.

    World Bank

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 2008. [140] p.

    The World Bank is committed to support Sub-Saharan Africa in responding to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. This Agenda for Action (AFA) is a road map for the next five years to guide Bank management and staff in fulfilling that commitment. It underscores the lessons learned and outlines a line of action. HIV/AIDS remains - and will remain for the foreseeable future - an enormous economic, social, and human challenge to Sub-Saharan Africa. This region is the global epicenter of the disease. About 22.5 million Africans are HIV positive, and AIDS is the leading cause of premature death on the continent. HIV/AIDS affects young people and women disproportionately. Some 61 percent of those who are HIV positive are women, and young women are three times as likely to be HIV positive than are young men. As a result of the epidemic, an estimated 11.4 million children under age 18 have lost at least one parent. Its impact on households, human capital, the private sector, and the public sector undermines the alleviation of poverty, the Bank's overarching mandate. In sum, HIV/AIDS threatens the development goals in the region unlike anywhere else in the world. (excerpt)
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  22. 22
    326278

    Using national resources to finance contraceptive procurement. Policy brief.

    John Snow [JSI]. DELIVER

    Arlington, Virginia, JSI, DELIVER, [2008]. [9] p. (Policy Brief)

    Driven by the increasing demand for and popularity of family planning, increasing population size, and changing demographics with more couples entering their fertile years, the financing requirement for contraceptives has become increasingly onerous. Strategies to finance contraceptives include expansion of the donor base; increased use of cost recovery, including revolving drug funds; greater use of the private sector; and direct government financing of contraceptive procurement. None of these is mutually exclusive, and to ensure contraceptive security, most countries are likely to use some or all of these approaches, and many others. Evidence suggests that many governments are beginning to finance contraceptive procurement using national resources, but limited data are publicly available regarding the global extent of this financing. This brief details the findings of a survey of the extent to which national governments of developing countries are using national resources to finance contraceptive procurement. The brief examines the different types of financing used, some of the benefits of this type of financing, and some of the issues it raises. Hopefully, this study can be repeated to track spending and will spur more rigorous efforts to measure this practice. (excerpt)
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  23. 23
    325152

    Achieving contraceptive security in El Salvador.

    John Snow [JSI]. DELIVER

    Arlington, Virginia, JSI, DELIVER, 2004 Nov. [4] p. (On Track)

    El Salvador has already reached several important milestones in its efforts to achieve contraceptive security-the guarantee that all people who wish to use contraceptives can choose, obtain, and use them at all times. With support from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), the Salvadoran Ministry of Health (MOH) has recently worked to expand people's access to contraceptives, particularly through community-based distribution. It has also helped to improve product management in health facilities by training service providers and by implementing a contraceptive logistics management information system. El Salvador's next challenge on the pathway to contraceptive security is to become financially self-sufficient in procuring reproductive health commodities. USAID is progressively phasing out its contraceptive donations to the country, and is providing technical assistance to guarantee that the MOH will be able to accurately forecast contraceptive demand and manage its own budget for meeting that demand. (author's)
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  24. 24
    324547

    Rwanda: Assessing the logistics management system for contraceptives. Executive summary.

    Ouedraogo Y; Utshudi A; Pehe N; Ndahinyuka J; Roche G

    Arlington, Virginia, John Snow [JSI], DELIVER, 2006 Mar. 15 p. (USAID Contract No. HRN-C-00-00-00010-00)

    In 2002, Rwanda's Ministry of Health carried out a survey on the performance of the logistics system for contraceptives, with technical support from DELIVER. In 2003 and 2004, routine surveys were undertaken as a follow-up to the program to ensure the availability of contraceptives and to strengthen the contraceptive logistics management system. This 2006 assessment report identifies areas where improvements have since been achieved and suggests remedial recommendations as well as actions to improve the logistics system. Information on the performance of the logistics system, the availability of products, and the availability and quality of logistics data is also presented. The report notes that Rwanda's logistics management system for contraceptives is in place, and that it correctly fulfills expected tasks. Products are available and the system runs smoothly. Critical logistics data are sent to the central level on a regular basis, and the reporting rate has reached 100 percent. Stockouts are marginal. This report illustrates the conditions that contributed to the satisfactory results achieved by the existing contraceptive management system. (author's)
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  25. 25
    324544

    Contraceptive procurement policies, practices, and options. Paraguay.

    Quesada N; Dayaratna V; Abramson W; Gribble J; Siman Betancourt V

    Arlington, Virginia, John Snow [JSI], DELIVER, 2006 Nov. [25] p. (USAID Contract No. HRN-C-00-00-00010-00)

    In light of the phaseout of donor funds for family planning in Latin America and the Caribbean, Paraguay will be facing increasing responsibility to finance and procure contraceptive commodities in the near future. The Government of Paraguay will need to look at regional and international procurement opportunities to ensure that contraceptive security is not compromised during this transition period. This report presents findings from a legal and regulatory analysis and pricing study of different procurement options to identify efficient, economical, high quality and timely distribution of contraceptives. A summary of the current country situation, procurement practices, laws, policies, and regulations is presented along with a comparison of regional contraceptive prices. Options and recommendations are presented for next steps. (author's)
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