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Your search found 3 Results

  1. 1
    335609

    Time for FAO to shift to a higher gear. A report of the CGD Working Group on Food Security.

    Ramachandran V; Timmer P; Friedman C

    Washington, D.C., Center for Global Development, 2013. [54] p.

    Food security has arisen again on the development agenda. High and volatile food prices took a toll in 2007–08, and in many low-income countries agricultural yields have risen little, if at all, in the last decade. Moreover, food production in these poor countries is especially vulnerable to climate change. Meeting this demand is a global challenge. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) is expected to lead the way in meeting this challenge and, with the arrival in 2012 of the first new director-general in 18 years, it has an opening to restructure itself to do so. In this report, the CGD Working Group on Food Security considers how the FAO might be reenergized and restructured for greater impact on the global challenge of boosting agricultural productivity. It points out that the FAO, despite its respected status as the premier global food agency, risks squandering its potential at a time when demand for food is rising fast, supplies are under threat, and hundreds of millions of people already don’t have enough to eat.
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  2. 2
    332463
    Peer Reviewed

    There are no quick fixes: a talk with Dr. Sam Zaramba.

    World Policy Journal. 2010 Summer; 27(2):41-46.

    Leaders should forget all about quick fixes, because quick fixes will never solve the most pressing global health challenges. World leaders cannot assume, "Oh, we are providing nets, so the nets are going to solve the entire malaria problem." Quite the opposite: just because the nets are being provided does not mean that they are being used. And therefore, we must listen to whoever would fund the strategies, policies and strategic plans developed within those countries to maximize impact. In Uganda, for instance, we have a forum where we have both the donors and the Ugandan government sitting together agreeing on the priorities. So let us address the priorities of the country together rather than having outside organizations say, "This is what we think is correct, we will dictate it to you, and we expect it to work." I've said many times that this does not work. Whatever health crisis is being addressed must be approached with the understanding that we are living in a global community. We must understand that whatever is happening in one country can easily spread to and affect almost anywhere in a very short period of time. We need to bear in mind that we are not only protecting the people we are providing services to, but we are also protecting ourselves. (Excerpt)
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  3. 3
    291616
    Peer Reviewed

    The UN and ideational leaderships.

    Hveem H

    Forum for Development Studies. 2005; 32(1):275-283.

    The article takes as its point of departure the programmatic point developed in the introduction to Ahead of the Curve – that the UN’s role in producing ideas should be contextualised, that is be seen as not only the source of ideas, but the carrier of ideas originating in some other source. The author finds several of the contributions that he has been able to read very strong analytically and empirically. But on some issues a few of the contributions could have been addressing the programmatic point more consciously; one example is population policy. The author also argues that the position of the UN, for instance in the public opinion, is a matter that could have been addressed more extensively in order to measure the impact and the legitimacy of the world organization in a situation where major reorganization of it is on the international agenda. (author's)
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