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Your search found 25 Results

  1. 1
    333332

    Global Plan towards the Elimination of New HIV Infections among Children by 2015 and Keeping their Mothers Alive. 2011-2015.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2011. [48] p. (UNAIDS/ JC2137E)

    This Global Plan provides the foundation for country-led movement towards the elimination of new HIV infections among children and keeping their mothers alive. The Global Plan was developed through a consultative process by a high level Global Task Team convened by UNAIDS. It brought together 25 countries and 30 civil society, private sector, networks of people living with HIV and international organizations to chart a roadmap to achieving this goal by 2015.
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  2. 2
    331889

    Progress in male circumcision scale-up: Country implementation update, July 2009.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    [Geneva, Switzerland], WHO, 2009. 8 p.

    This report shows how countries with low prevalence of male circumcision but high prevalence of HIV have made progress to scale up male circumcision services.
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  3. 3
    323311

    Empowering women to fight AIDS: Women's leadership is key, argues UN envoy for AIDS in Africa.

    Fleshman M

    Africa Renewal. 2007 Oct; 21(3):5.

    Out of nearly 25 million Africans today living with HIV/AIDS, almost 60 per cent are women, reports the Joint UN Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS). In some African countries, more than two-thirds of people with the virus are women. It was therefore appropriate that UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon appointed an African woman, Ms. Elizabeth Mataka, as his new special envoy for AIDS in Africa. A citizen of Botswana, Ms. Mataka has lived and worked in neighbouring Zambia for many years, and since 1990 has been on the frontline of Africa's struggle against the disease, as a community activist, programme director and international advocate. At the time of her UN appointment on 21 May, she was serving as executive director of the Zambia National AIDS Network and as vice-chairperson of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. The struggle against HIV/AIDS requires a far greater focus on women, says Ms. Mataka. "Unless we empower women not just economically, but with technology that they can initiate and control to protect themselves against infection, we will remain with very limited success," she told Africa Renewal from her office in Lusaka. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    321121

    UNAIDS practical guidelines for intensifying HIV prevention: Towards universal access.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2007. [66] p. (UNAIDS/07.07E; JC1274E)

    These Practical Guidelines for Intensifying HIV Prevention: Towards Universal Access are designed to provide policy makers and planners with practical guidance to tailor their national HIV prevention response so that they respond to the epidemic dynamics and social context of the country and populations who remain most vulnerable to and at risk of HIV infection. They have been developed in consultation with the UNAIDS cosponsors, international collaborating partners, government, civil society leaders and other experts. They build on Intensifying HIV Prevention: UNAIDS Policy Position Paper and the UNAIDS Action Plan on Intensifying HIV Prevention. In 2006, governments committed themselves to scaling up HIV prevention and treatment responses to ensure universal access by 2010. While in the past five years treatment access has expanded rapidly, the number of new HIV infections has not decreased - estimated at 4.3 (3.6-6.6) million in 2006 - with many people unable to access prevention services to prevent HIV infection. These Guidelines recognize that to sustain the advances in antiretroviral treatment and to ensure true universal access requires that prevention services be scaled up simultaneously with treatment. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    314632

    Keeping the promise: an agenda for action on women and AIDS.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]. Global Coalition on Women and AIDS

    [Geneva, Switzerland], UNAIDS, [2006]. 29 p.

    AIDS is affecting women and girls in increasing numbers: globally, women comprise almost 50% of women living with HIV. Nearly 25 years into the epidemic, gender inequality and the low status of women remain two of the principal drivers of HIV. Yet current AIDS responses do not, on the whole, tackle the social, cultural and economic factors that put women at risk of HIV, and that unduly burden them with the epidemic's consequences. Women and girls have less access to education and HIV information, tend not to enjoy equality in marriage and sexual relations, and remain the primary caretakers of family and community members suffering from AIDS-related illnesses. To be more effective, AIDS responses must address the factors that continue to put women at risk. The world's governments have repeatedly declared their commitment to improve the status of women and acknowledged the linkage with HIV. In some areas, progress has been made. By and large, though, efforts have been small-scale, half-hearted and haphazard. Major opportunities to stem the global AIDS epidemic have been missed. It is time the world's leaders lived up to their promises. That's why the UNAIDS-led Global Coalition on Women and AIDS is calling for a massive scaling up of AIDS responses for women and girls. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    313129

    Expanding the field of inquiry: a cross-country study of higher education institutions' responses to HIV and AIDS.

    UNESCO. Division of Higher Education

    Paris, France, UNESCO, 2006 Mar. 73 p. (ED-2006/WS/25; CLD 27584)

    This report compares, analyses, and summarises findings from twelve case studies commissioned by the United Nations Education, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in higher education institutions in Brazil, Burkina Faso, China, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica, Lebanon, Lesotho, Suriname, Thailand, and Viet Nam. It aims to deepen the understanding of the impact of HIV and AIDS on tertiary institutions and the institutional response to the epidemic in different social and cultural contexts, at varying stages of the epidemic, and in different regions of the world. The overall objective is to identify relevant and appropriate actions that higher education institutions worldwide can take to prevent the further spread of HIV, to manage the impact of HIV and AIDS on the higher education sector, and to mitigate the effects of HIV and AIDS on individuals, campuses, and communities. Specific focus includes: Institutional HIV and AIDS policies and plans; Leadership on HIV and AIDS; Education related to HIV and AIDS (including pre- and in-service training, formal and nonformal education); HIV and AIDS research; Partnerships and networks; HIV and AIDS programmes and services; and Community outreach. (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    312821

    Brazilian leadership in the context of the UNGASS Declaration of Commitment in HIV / AIDS.

    Bermudez XP; Seffner F

    Revista de Saude Publica / Journal of Public Health. 2006 Apr; 40 Suppl:101-108.

    The present article focuses on the subject of leadership in the United Nations Declaration of Commitment in HIV/AIDS, discussing the advancements, challenges, and limitations to the action of major social forces acting to control the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Brazil. The national policy on AIDS was characterized by the illustrative Brazilian experience in summoning multiple government, civil society, and private sector initiatives to fight the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The synergy between different partners needs to be enhanced and efforts in the field of scientific and technological development must be articulated in order to minimize the effects of technological dependence. These actions are aimed at the sustainable production of drugs and other products, with the perspective of improving the fulfillment of the constitutional precept of health as a universal right. (author's)
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  8. 8
    303041

    From advocacy to action: a progress report on UNAIDS at country level.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2005 Feb. 79 p. (UNAIDS/05.28E)

    This report summarizes UNAIDS' assistance to countries in 2004 and 2005. Drawn from the reports of UNAIDS' Country Coordinators from over 75 countries, the report is divided into five chapters. Basic information on UNAIDS and how it operates, especially at country-level. How UNAIDS is contributing to implementation of the "Three Ones" principles. The many ways in which UNAIDS has assisted countries in strengthening their responses to AIDS. How UNAIDS is working to enhance the United Nations system's capacity to assist countries in responding to AIDS. How UNAIDS plans to meet key challenges for the future. (excerpt)
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  9. 9
    300918

    Corporate strategy on HIV / AIDS.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]. Bureau for Development Policy. HIV / AIDS Group

    New York, New York, UNDP, Bureau for Development Policy, HIV / AIDS Group, [2004]. 8 p.

    Twenty years on, the HIV/AIDS epidemic continues to spread without respite. Almost 40 million people are living with HIV and AIDS, half of them women. The impact of HIV/AIDS is unique because it kills adults in the most productive period of their lives, depriving families, communities, and nations of their most productive people. Adding to an already heavy disease burden in poor countries, the epidemic is deepening poverty, reversing human development, worsening gender inequalities, eroding the capacity of governments to provide essential services, reducing labour productivity, and hampering pro-poor growth. The epidemic is quickly becoming the biggest obstacle to achieving the Millennium Development Goals. (excerpt)
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  10. 10
    300915

    Community mobilization and AIDS: UNAIDS technical update.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 1997 Apr. [8] p. (UNAIDS Best Practice Collection; UNAIDS Technical Update)

    UNAIDS understands a "mobilized community" to have most or all of the following characteristics: members are aware -- in a detailed and realistic way -- of their individual and collective vulnerability to HIV/AIDS; members are motivated to do something about this vulnerability; members have practical knowledge of the different options they can take to reduce their vulnerability; members take action within their capability, applying their own strengths and investing their own resources -- including money, labour, materials or whatever else they have to contribute; members participate in decision-making on what actions to take, evaluate the results, and take responsibility for both success and failure; the community seeks outside assistance and cooperation when needed. (excerpt)
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  11. 11
    300913

    Report on series of workshops "Leadership for Results". UNDP in Ukraine. May, 24-31 2004.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]

    [Kyiv], Ukraine, UNDP, 2004. [61] p.

    The United Nations Development Program (UNDP) organized a series of "Leadership for Results" workshops on May 24-31 2004 to develop and boost leadership skills of several participants' categories: trade union leaders, public figures, physicians, women-leaders, Peer Education Program trainers, etc. Allan Henderson, who facilitated this workshop, pointed out that "these workshops are not meant to make leaders of those who are not leaders, but rather to provide the opportunity for people who already are leaders to step out of the day-to-day business and address their own development." The task for participants is to improve themselves and society, to get to the higher leadership level, to develop more holistic outlook and support leadership skills with more comprehensive background. The structure of this leadership workshop stipulates three meetings with three months intervals. Methods applied in the workshop are as follows: education (knowledge transfer); training (practice of skill development) and coaching (establishing new opportunities for the future). The first workshop on May 24-25 that UNDP held jointly with the International Labor Organization (ILO) welcomed over 70 leaders from four most active trade union associations in Ukraine. It was just recently that trade unions started paying attention to the problem of HIV/AIDS. For the majority of participants it was their first workshop. (excerpt)
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  12. 12
    300912

    Personal commitment, concrete actions. Leadership in action.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]

    Kyiv, Ukraine, UNDP, [2004]. 15 p.

    Ukraine is at a critical point in its response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The country has the highest rate of HIV infection prevalence in Europe and the CIS, about one per cent of the adult population. At the heart of generating an effective national response on HIV/AIDS are committed, mobilized leaders who are speaking out and taking action in their respective spheres of influence. Analysis of successful responses around the globe has highlighted leadership as a key ingredient for overcoming stigma and effective action in both prevention and care. Leaders for an effective national response must come from all levels of society -- national, regional and local Government; NGOs; media; schools; youth organizations; and the household. In modern, democratic Ukraine, citizens enjoy unprecedented freedoms and choices. Each leads his or her own life in a very personal way. Faced with the present onslaught of HIV/AIDS such individuals need basic information and support for their safe behaviour choices to avoid infection, for their compassion for those living with the virus and for their inclusion in the nationwide response. (excerpt)
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  13. 13
    300910

    HIV / AIDS programme strategic framework. Making the possible happen.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]

    [Kyiv], Ukraine, UNDP, [2004]. 11 p.

    HIV/AIDS presents the greatest challenge to human development the world has ever seen. With nearly 42 million people living with HIV/ AIDS, 20 million already dead and 15,000 new infections daily, its devastating scale and impact constitute a global emergency that is undermining social and economic development throughout the world and affecting individuals, families, communities and nations. HIV/AIDS reverses gains in human development and denies people the basic opportunities for living long, healthy, creative and productive lives. It impoverishes people and places burdens on households and communities to care for the sick and dying, while claiming the lives of people in their most productive years. HIV/AIDS also results in social exclusion and violations of human dignity and rights affecting people's psychological well-being. While the long-term consequences may not yet be visible here, Ukraine is glimpsing the enormity of the problem in its newly independent country. The number of reported cases of HIV infection in the country has increased 20 times in the past five years yielding estimates of 300,000 to 400,000 people already infected, which is approximately 1% of the adult population. The Declaration of Commitment of the UN General Assembly Special Session on HIV/AIDS notes "the potential exists for a rapid escalation of the epidemic". The dynamics of the spread of the epidemic can be indicative of the potential magnitude of future human development impacts, deepening over time and affecting future generations. (excerpt)
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  14. 14
    300908

    Breakthrough: UNDP's response to HIV / AIDS.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]

    New York, New York, UNDP, 2004 Jun. 34 p.

    Something remarkable is happening in many parts of the world. Faced with a common enemy, people from different countries are discovering a shared goal. These are ordinary men and women who until recently had thought of HIV/AIDS as something that happened to other people. Responding to the epidemic has today become a passionate cause for each one. These individuals and groups are linked by one common factor: They have all been part of UNDP's Leadership for Results programme-- a unique and innovative process that helps to create an enabling environment to halt and reverse the spread of HIV/AIDS, by fostering hope, generating transformation and producing breakthrough results. (excerpt)
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  15. 15
    291907

    HIV Prevention Now Programme Briefs. Overview.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 2001 Aug. [6] p. (HIV Prevention Now Programme Briefs No.1)

    The purpose of this Programme Brief series is to provide staff, particularly field staff, with concise and useful information in supporting countries in their response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. HIV Prevention Now Programme Brief No.1 - Overview, is intended to summarize the importance of prevention in combating the HIV/AIDS pandemic and baseline strategies for UNFPA programme response at the country level. Upcoming briefs will focus on substantive areas including prevention of HIV infection in mothers and its transmission to their children, young people, condom programming, gender, emergency situations, population policy, and population based data. (excerpt)
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  16. 16
    287506

    Talking points for Bill Gates, UN Media Leaders Summit on HIV / AIDS, January 15, 2004. 8-10 minute remarks.

    Gates B

    [Unpublished] 2004. 4 p.

    The media have played a crucial role in highlighting the most important issues of our time—civil rights, apartheid, political oppression. Yet HIV/AIDS may be the greatest challenge of all. You have played a remarkable role already. In fact, the media had a great influence on my own commitment to fight diseases in the developing world. Early on, when my wife, Melinda, and I were thinking about our philanthropy and how we could have the greatest impact with our resources, my father sent me a clip from a newspaper about preventable deaths in poor countries. I remember reading a chart that listed the world’s deadliest diseases. One disease I had never even heard of— rotavirus—was killing literally half a million kids each year. I thought: That can’t be true, that’s got to be a typo. If a single disease was killing that many kids, we would have heard about it—it’d be front-page news. But it isn’t. As Melinda and I have become more engaged in global health issues over the past decade, one thing has become clear: not enough is being done about the millions of preventable deaths each year from diseases like AIDS or malaria. In part, that’s because people aren’t aware of what is happening. We don’t see these issues covered enough in newspapers, radio and television. (excerpt)
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  17. 17
    283992

    HIV / AIDS: implications for poverty reduction.

    Loewenson R

    New York, New York, United Nations Development Programme [UNDP], Bureau for Development Policy [BDP], Special Initiative on HIV / AIDS, 2001. 27 p.

    The devastation caused by HIV/AIDS is unique because it is depriving families, communities and entire nations of their young and most productive people. The epidemic is deepening poverty, reversing human development achievements, worsening gender inequalities, eroding the ability of governments to maintain essential services, reducing labour productivity and supply, and putting a brake on economic growth. These worsening conditions in turn make people and households even more at risk of, or vulnerable to, the epidemic, and sabotages global and national efforts to improve access to treatment and care. This cycle must be broken to ensure a sustainable solution to the HIV/AIDS crisis. The response to HIV/AIDS so far has focused, rightly so, on the challenge of containing the epidemic and preventing new infections through advocacy, information and education campaigns, behaviour change communication, condom distribution, programmes targeting groups that are particularly vulnerable to infection, and other key interventions. The other part of the response is focusing on treatment and care for people living with HIV and AIDS — efforts that are expected to intensify as new treatments become more accessible and affordable. Both prevention and treatment are top priorities in not only saving lives and reducing human suffering, but also in limiting the future impact on human development and poverty reduction efforts. (excerpt)
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  18. 18
    281204

    The New York Call to Commitment: Linking HIV / AIDS and Sexual and Reproductive Health.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]; Family Care International

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 2004. 2 p.

    The AIDS epidemic is a global catastrophe, responsible for over 20 million deaths worldwide, tens of millions of children left orphaned, and 40 million people living with HIV. Similarly, five hundred million people a year suffer from reproductive health morbidity or lack of access to modern contraceptives, and there are over half a million pregnancy related deaths each year. In the face of these unprecedented crises, UNFPA and UNAIDS, in collaboration with Family Care International, convened a high-level global consultation at the Rockefeller Foundation in New York on 7 June 2004. (excerpt)
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  19. 19
    280333

    Member voices: Virtual Pathways leading Africa's fight against HIV / AIDS.

    Urdaneta C

    HealthLink. 2004 Oct 1; (129):[3] p..

    “My mother, stop lying to me. You think I don't know my father is dying of AIDS?" It was 1996, and 10-year old Samwel challenged his mother Elsa to accept a harsh reality as his classmates, teachers, and neighbors listened to a discussion rarely conducted in public. Samwel did not care - he could not be silenced. Just 10 years old, his words weighed heavily on his mother, who had recently found out she was HIV-positive, like her husband: "I left perplexed and traumatized. He helped me decide to tell my family." Their story is not an uncommon one in Africa: A dying husband and father, a wife and mother infected by him, children to care for, and a questionable future. But Elsa Ouko is no ordinary woman. A brief conversation between a mother and her son became a turning point in their lives. Elsa and her family live near Eldoret, a small town in northwest Kenya where HIV is widespread, not unlike hundreds and thousands across the African continent. For the first time since finding out she was HIV-positive eight years ago, Elsa is ill. Despite this, she is quick to smile, her short hair framing her face on her slim, but not wasted, 48-year-old frame. Elsa thinks nothing to tell her story again, sitting next to her friend and colleague Margaret, who is also HIV-positive. Margaret is tall and heavy-set, helped by the antiretrovirals she uses most of her meager teacher's salary to purchase. Elsa, and millions like her, cannot afford the medicines. She is unemployed and has worked as a housewife for most of her life. Together, Margaret and Elsa talk passionately about a disease that kills 8,000 people worldwide every day - that is 353 deaths per hour, six every minute, and one every ten seconds - among them Elsa's husband. One thing is clear: they have turned a devastating diagnosis into a positive campaign to fight HIV/AIDS. (excerpt)
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  20. 20
    278139

    Global concerns focus on the powerless women who are living with AIDS in the developing world.

    AIDS Alert. 2004 May; 1-2.

    UNAIDS and other international organizations have been drawing attention in recent months to the plight of women in nations where HIV infection is pandemic and likely to continue the trend of disproportionately affecting women. Half of the people living with HIV/AIDS worldwide are women, and in sub-Saharan Africa, women comprised 58% of all people infected with HIV by the end of 2003, according to the latest statistics from UNAIDS of Geneva. As women's stake in the epidemic rises, so do the challenges facing groups that desire to improve HIV prevention among women. What's lacking is strong women's leadership on the issue of women and HW, says Mary Robinson, executive director of the Ethical Globalization Initiative in New York City. "At the grass-roots level, women's organizations are dealing with this problem and are aware of it, but it hasn't been sufficiently handled at the leadership level," she says. For example, women's leadership is needed to tackle the patriarchal traditions, such as property, marriage, and inheritance laws, that contribute to the overall powerlessness of women in many developing nations, she notes. (excerpt)
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  21. 21
    276601

    Keeping the promise: summary of the Declaration of Commitment on HIV / AIDS, United Nations General Assembly, Special Session on HIV / AIDS, 25-27 June 2001, New York.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2002 Jun. 33 p. (UNAIDS/02.31E; PN-ACP-799)

    At the meeting, Heads of State and Representatives of Governments issued the Declaration of Commitment on HIV/AIDS. This Declaration describes in its preamble (paragraphs 1–36), the extent of the epidemic, the effects it has had, and the ways to combat it. The Declaration then states what governments have pledged to do—themselves, with others in international and regional partnerships, and with the support of civil society— to reverse the epidemic. The Declaration is not a legally binding document. However, it is a clear statement by governments concerning that which they have agreed should be done to fight HIV/AIDS and that which they have committed to doing, often with specific deadlines. As such, the Declaration is a powerful tool with which to guide and secure action, commitment, support and resources for all those fighting the epidemic, both within and outside government. This booklet simplifies and summarizes the text of the Declaration in an effort to make it more accessible to all and to encourage everyone to do his or her part to put it into action. Where possible, it pairs relevant paragraphs from the preamble with relevant sections from the body of the Declaration. The bold text in quotes is taken directly from the Declaration. Also included are quotes from some of the statements made by speakers at the meeting, as well as from people affected by HIV/AIDS. It should be stressed that the paragraphs in this booklet are simplified versions of those found in the Declaration. They should not be substituted for the full, original text when formal reference to the Declaration is needed. The original text is attached as an annex for easy reference. (excerpt)
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  22. 22
    274527

    Buddhist monks address HIV / AIDS.

    Borthwick P

    Global AIDSLink. 2002 Jan; (71):11, 17.

    In many Buddhist countries, people assume that monks would never entertain the prospect of working in HIV/AIDS, an illness associated in many people’s minds with immoral, rather than unsafe, behaviors. In some countries where monks have played more of a ceremonial or purely spiritual role, people wonder how monks will cope with the intense social action HIV/AIDS requires. At this stage someone usually raises the example of Thailand where monks have played a role in development activities for over two decades and have been active at grassroots level on HIV/AIDS for many years. For many countries in the Mekong region, Thailand’s example seems a hard act to follow. And it’s true that monks in Cambodia and Lao PDR, for instance, tend to be less well educated, at least in secular subjects, than their peers in Thailand. It is certainly true that their community temples have less resources. But, as UNICEF has been delighted to discover, there are many, many monks in the Mekong region for whom the realization of the extent of the AIDS problem has been a call to action. (excerpt)
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  23. 23
    191983

    Follow up on the United Nations General Assembly Special Session on HIV/AIDS. Work of WHO: progress report - July 2002.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of HIV / AIDS

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2002. 28 p. (HIV/2002.12)

    As a result of the United Nations General Assembly Special Session on HIV/ AIDS, held in June 2001, many WHO Member States want to intensify the capacity of the health sector to withstand and respond more effectively to the HIV epidemic. They are looking to the international community – specifically UNAIDS cosponsors such as WHO – for support as they plan to scale up health sector action in response to HIV/AIDS. National officials require assistance in articulating evidence-based health-sector policies and implementing key interventions; building the capacity to monitor epidemiological and behavioural trends; developing a critical mass of trained health professionals; mobilizing resources and negotiating alliances with private or voluntary entities, and undertaking advocacy on a scale proportionate to the size of the task being faced. They want to ensure that research is innovative and relevant to developing countries. They require guidance on procuring quality commodities (such as condoms, HIV-related drugs and diagnostics) at the best possible prices, and in using them most effectively. This report provides an overview of the extensive program of HIV/AIDS activities now being undertaken by WHO - with an emphasis on the work being conducted at headquarters in Geneva, but including some activities being conducted at regional level - to assist countries in addressing these challenges and meeting the targets set out in the UNGASS Declaration of Commitment. (excerpt)
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  24. 24
    188153

    Accelerating action against AIDS in Africa.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2003 Sep. 74 p. (UNAIDS/03.44E)

    This report provides a snapshot of the action being taken across the African continent in response to the challenge of AIDS. It highlights governments working with all their ministries to deliver a full-scale response. It demonstrates progress in closing the gaps in the provision of HIV prevention and treatment. It shows the value of partnership between government, communities and businesses. It showcases the determination of African women to throw off the disproportionate burden that AIDS represents for them. And it makes manifest the voice of hope, in the many successful responses by young people in fighting the epidemic. (author's)
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  25. 25
    176129

    Gender and HIV / AIDS: leadership roles in social mobilization. Report of the UNFPA-organized break-out panel, African Development Forum, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 3-7 December 2000.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, [2001]. [3], 32 p.

    The United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) was responsible for the breakout session on gender and HIV/AIDS, entitled "Gender and HIV/AIDS: Leadership Roles in Social Mobilization." Held on 5 December 2000, this session took the form of a panel group discussion chaired by Ms. Virginia Ofosu-Amaah, Director, UNFPA Africa Division, New York. Panellists included Mr. Martin Foreman, Director, The Panos AIDS Programme, London; Ms. Ngozi Iwere, Nigeria; Ms. Jane Wambui Kiragu, Executive Director of the Federation of Women Lawyers, Kenya; Ms. Wariara Mbugua, Chief, UNFPA Gender Issues Branch, Technical Support Division, New York; and Ms. Marcela Villarreal, Chief, FAO Population Programme Service, Rome. The rapporteurs were Ms. Miriam Jato, Ms. Mere N. Kisekka and Mr. Opia M. Kumah, Advisers, UNFPA Country Technical Services Team in Ethiopia. The session was well attended, and many in the audience actively participated in the discussions by sharing their experiences and providing suggestions to deal with the issues. What follows is a summary of key points and recommendations that arose from the panel discussions on "'Gender and HIV/AIDS: Leadership Roles in Social Mobilization", together with the presentations made by the panellists, which form the major part of this report. Also included is an outline of issues related to youth perspectives on gender and HIV/AIDS presented by a young participant from Liberia. Each of the presentations includes conclusions and recommendations. (excerpt)
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