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    181166

    End child labour. Background information.

    EarthAction

    Santiago, Chile, EarthAction, [2003]. [4] p.

    In their Handbook for Parliamentarians, the International Labour Organisation and the International Parliamentary Union define child labour as "work, that is mentally, physically, socially, or morally dangerous and harmful to children; and interferes with their schooling by depriving them of the opportunity to attend school; by obliging them to leave school prematurely; or by requiring them to attempt to combine school attendance with excessively long and heavy work." In its most extreme forms, it involves children being enslaved, separated from their families, exposed to serious hazards and illnesses and/or left to fend for themselves on the million streets of large cities – all of this at a very early age. Article 32 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), an international treaty ratified by 191 countries, states that every child has the right to be "...protected from economic exploitation and from performing any work that is likely to be hazardous or to interfere with the child's education, or to be harmful to the child's health or physical, mental, spiritual, moral or social development." This clear, unambiguous language protects all children (anyone 17 or younger) from all forms of child labour throughout the world. It's important to note that the term “child labour" does not refer simply to any work performed by a child, but specifically to work done by a child that is considered detrimental to their growth and violates their rights. A child could attend school and still be able to work with their family part time to help grow food or learn a skill, activities which wouldn't be considered harmful. (excerpt)
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