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Your search found 4 Results

  1. 1
    327135

    Integrating the human rights of women throughout the United Nations system. Commission on Human Rights resolution 2002/50.

    United Nations. Commission on Human Rights

    [Geneva, Switzerland], United Nations, Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, 2002. 5 p. (E/CN.4/RES/2002/50)

    Reaffirming that the equal rights of women and men are enshrined in the Charter of the United Nations, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women and other international human rights instruments. Recalling all previous resolutions on this subject. Recalling also the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action adopted in June 1993 by the World Conference on Human Rights (A/CONF.157/23) which affirms that the human rights of women and of the girl child are an inalienable, integral and indivisible part of universal human rights and calls for action to integrate the equal status and human rights of women into the mainstream of United Nations activity system-wide. Welcoming the increased integration of a gender perspective into the work of all entities of the United Nations and the major United Nations conferences, special sessions and summits, such as the special session of the General Assembly on human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and the World Conference against Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance and their integrated and coordinated follow-up. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    288718
    Peer Reviewed

    Domestic violence as a human rights issue. [La violencia doméstica como un problema de derechos humanos]

    Thomas DQ; Beasley ME

    Human Rights Quarterly. 1993 Feb; 15(1):36-62.

    Part I of this paper examines why domestic violence was not analyzed traditionally as a human rights issue. It discusses the three independent, though interrelated, changes that occurred to begin to make such an analysis possible: the expansion of the application of state responsibility; the recognition of domestic violence as widespread and largely unprocesuted (brought about by greater public and international recognition of the daily violence experienced by women); and, the understanding that the systematic, discriminatory non-prosecution of domestic violence constitutes a violation of the right to equal protection under international law. Part II describes the first practical application of this evolving approach, in Brazil, where the presence of a broad-based women's movement made it possible to collect the data necessary to support an analysis of the government's responsibility for domestic violence. Finally, Part III explores the value and limitations of the human rights approach to combating domestic violence. We conclude that the human rights approach can be a powerful tool to combat domestic violence, but that there are currently both practical and methodological limitations--in part related to the use of the equal protection framework to assign state responsibility for domestic violence--that are problematic and require further analysis to make the approach more effective. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    186431

    The trafficking of women: a human rights issue. [Tráfico de mujeres: un problema de derechos humanos]

    Morada. Citizenship and Human Rights Program

    Women's Health Journal. 2003 Apr-Jun; (2):19-21.

    International trafficking of women for sexual exploitation is reaching alarming proportions, particularly in Latin America. The sexual trade of women constitutes a human rights concern which reveals the gross inequality between the sexes and the subordination of women on a global scale. An estimated four million people are victims worldwide of this illegal industry that generates US$7 billion dollars annually. The significant number of women from Latin America and the Caribbean who are engaged in prostitution in Europe, Japan and the United States strongly suggests the existence of trafficking for sexual exploitation. An estimated 50,000 women from the Dominican Republic, 75,000 from Brazil and 35,000 from Colombia work in prostitution in other parts of the world, and a large percentage of those women have been victims of trafficking at the hands of international criminal networks whose strategies are very similar to those of drug and weapons traffickers. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    184832

    Angola. Struggling through peace: return and resettlement in Angola.

    Marques N

    New York, New York, Human Rights Watch, 2003 Aug. [4], 29 p. (Angola Vol. 15, No. 16(A))

    This short report is based on an investigation by Human Rights Watch conducted in March and April 2003. Our researchers interviewed over fifty internally displaced persons, refugees, and former combatants in the transit centers and the camps of Bengo, Bengo II and Kituma in the province of Uíge and Cazombo in the province of Moxico. Human Rights Watch researchers conducted twenty-one interviews with concerned U.N. agencies, NGOs and other organizations, including the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), the U.N. Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the World Food Programme (WFP), Oxfam-GB, GOAL, African Humanitarian Aid (AHA), Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)-Spain, MSF-Belgium, Jesuit Refugee Service (JRS), Lutheran World Federation (LWF), International Monetary Fund (IMF), World Bank, Trocaire, Associação Justiça, Paz e Democracia (AJPD), Liga da Mulher Angolana (LIMA) and Mulheres, Paz e Desenvolvimento. Human Rights Watch researchers also interviewed Angolan central government officials and police, and conducted six interviews with local Angolan authorities in three provinces. Where necessary, the names of those interviewed are withheld or changed in this short report to protect their confidentiality. (excerpt)
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