Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 21 Results

  1. 1
    321700

    Supporting gender justice in Afghanistan: opportunities and challenges.

    Mantovani A

    [Unpublished] 2004. Presented at the Conference on Gender Justice in Post-Conflict Situations, "Peace Needs Women and Women Need Justice”. Co-organized by the United Nations Development Fund for Women [UNIFEM] and the International Legal Assistance Consortium. New York, New York, September 15-17, 2004. 8 p.

    For 25 years war raged in Afghanistan, destroying both the institutional fiber of the country and its justice system. Even in the period before the wars, the justice system had only managed to impose itself sporadically. Disputes that arose had to be resolved, for the most part, through informal religious or tribal systems. However acceptable some of the main laws may have been technically, they were offset by various factors: the poor training of judges, lawyers and other legal workers; decaying infrastructures; and ignorance of the law and basic rights by common citizens and even the judges themselves. The prison system had suffered even greater damages. Its infrastructure and organization were in ruins. Today enormous efforts have been mobilized to build a fair and functioning system that is respectful of human rights and international standards. It will take years for the Afghan government and people to do the job-with the help of the international community. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    314640

    Collection of international instruments and other legal texts concerning refugees and others of concern to UNHCR. 3. Regional instruments: Africa, Middle East, Asia, Americas. Provisional release.

    United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees [UNHCR]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNHCR, 2006 Nov. [385] p.

    The first edition of the Collection of International Instruments Concerning Refugees was published in 1979. Thereafter, the compilation was updated regularly as new developments took place in the international law relating to refugees and other persons of concern to UNHCR. The 2006 edition takes account of the increasingly apparent inter-relationship and complimentarity between, on one hand, international refugee law and, on the other, human rights, humanitarian, criminal and other bodies of law. The Collection features over 240 instruments and legal texts drawn from across this broad spectrum. Compared to the earlier edition of the Collection, this edition includes many international instruments and legal texts relating to issues such as statelessness, the internally displaced and the asylum-migration debate (such as trafficking, smuggling, maritime and aviation law and migrants) as well as matters such as torture, discrimination, detention and the protection of women and children. The range of relevant regional instruments and legal texts have also been enhanced, not least to ensure that they are used more effectively while advocating for refugees and others of concern to UNHCR. Today, users can access veritable reference resources by electronic means. The Collection itself is accessible on-line. For users not able to access electronic facilities, it provides, in hard copy, the most important instruments in a manner easy to use in daily work. Indeed, even for those otherwise able to take advantage of electronic facilities, the availability of these instruments systematically in a single source offers unique facility and benefits. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    314639

    Collection of international instruments and other legal texts concerning refugees and others of concern to UNHCR. 1. International instruments: UNHCR, refugees and asylum, statelessness, internally displaced persons, migrants, human rights. Provisional release.

    United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees [UNHCR]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNHCR, 2006 Nov. [585] p.

    The first edition of the Collection of International Instruments Concerning Refugees was published in 1979. Thereafter, the compilation was updated regularly as new developments took place in the international law relating to refugees and other persons of concern to UNHCR. The 2006 edition takes account of the increasingly apparent inter-relationship and complimentarity between, on one hand, international refugee law and, on the other, human rights, humanitarian, criminal and other bodies of law. The Collection features over 240 instruments and legal texts drawn from across this broad spectrum. Compared to the earlier edition of the Collection, this edition includes many international instruments and legal texts relating to issues such as statelessness, the internally displaced and the asylum-migration debate (such as trafficking, smuggling, maritime and aviation law and migrants) as well as matters such as torture, discrimination, detention and the protection of women and children. The range of relevant regional instruments and legal texts have also been enhanced, not least to ensure that they are used more effectively while advocating for refugees and others of concern to UNHCR. Today, users can access veritable reference resources by electronic means. The Collection itself is accessible on-line. For users not able to access electronic facilities, it provides, in hard copy, the most important instruments in a manner easy to use in daily work. Indeed, even for those otherwise able to take advantage of electronic facilities, the availability of these instruments systematically in a single source offers unique facility and benefits. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    314638

    Collection of international instruments and other legal texts concerning refugees and others of concern to UNHCR. 2. International instruments: international humanitarian law, international criminal law, international maritime and aviation law, miscellaneous. Provisional release.

    United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees [UNHCR]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNHCR, 2006 Nov. [415] p.

    The first edition of the Collection of International Instruments Concerning Refugees was published in 1979. Thereafter, the compilation was updated regularly as new developments took place in the international law relating to refugees and other persons of concern to UNHCR. The 2006 edition takes account of the increasingly apparent inter-relationship and complimentarity between, on one hand, international refugee law and, on the other, human rights, humanitarian, criminal and other bodies of law. The Collection features over 240 instruments and legal texts drawn from across this broad spectrum. Compared to the earlier edition of the Collection, this edition includes many international instruments and legal texts relating to issues such as statelessness, the internally displaced and the asylum-migration debate (such as trafficking, smuggling, maritime and aviation law and migrants) as well as matters such as torture, discrimination, detention and the protection of women and children. The range of relevant regional instruments and legal texts have also been enhanced, not least to ensure that they are used more effectively while advocating for refugees and others of concern to UNHCR. Today, users can access veritable reference resources by electronic means. The Collection itself is accessible on-line. For users not able to access electronic facilities, it provides, in hard copy, the most important instruments in a manner easy to use in daily work. Indeed, even for those otherwise able to take advantage of electronic facilities, the availability of these instruments systematically in a single source offers unique facility and benefits. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  5. 5
    297666
    Peer Reviewed

    Children's right to express views and have them taken seriously.

    Lansdown G; Karkara R

    Lancet. 2006 Feb 25; 367(9511):690-692.

    The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) introduced the principle that children are entitled to be listened to and taken seriously in all matters that concern them. The Committee on the Rights of the Child, the body set up under the terms of the Convention to monitor governments' progress in implementing its provisions, argues that this right should be understood as an underlying principle by which all other rights are ensured and respected. Historically, children's perspectives and experiences have been disregarded in favour of those of adults; young people considered to lack the expertise and competence to inform adult decision-making, irrespective of whether the decisions directly affect them. Now, governments, policymakers, professionals, and parents are required to take greater note of the concerns of those younger than age 18 years, giving due weight to the views expressed in accordance with the age and maturity of the child. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  6. 6
    292522
    Peer Reviewed

    When neutrality is a sin: the Darfur crisis and the crisis of humanitarian intervention in Sudan.

    Udombana NJ

    Human Rights Quarterly. 2005 Nov; 27(4):1149-1199.

    The violent conflict that erupted in Darfur, Western Sudan, in 2003 has led to grave violations of human rights and humanitarian law, particularly by militias backed by the Government of Sudan (GoS). This article argues that such grave crimes, which are continuing, justify humanitarian military intervention, as diplomacy has failed to prize the GoS into halting the mayhem. It denounces the apparent posture of neutrality by the international community to these atrocities, stressing that such neutrality helps the killers and not the victims. The article also reflects on the continuing security challenges that face Africa and proffer suggestions towards confronting them. There are two kinds of injustice: the first is found in those who do an injury, the second in those who fail to protect another from injury when they can. Man’s inhumanity to man is not only perpetrated by the vitriolic actions of those who are bad. It is also perpetrated by the vitiating inaction of those who are good. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  7. 7
    288718
    Peer Reviewed

    Domestic violence as a human rights issue. [La violencia doméstica como un problema de derechos humanos]

    Thomas DQ; Beasley ME

    Human Rights Quarterly. 1993 Feb; 15(1):36-62.

    Part I of this paper examines why domestic violence was not analyzed traditionally as a human rights issue. It discusses the three independent, though interrelated, changes that occurred to begin to make such an analysis possible: the expansion of the application of state responsibility; the recognition of domestic violence as widespread and largely unprocesuted (brought about by greater public and international recognition of the daily violence experienced by women); and, the understanding that the systematic, discriminatory non-prosecution of domestic violence constitutes a violation of the right to equal protection under international law. Part II describes the first practical application of this evolving approach, in Brazil, where the presence of a broad-based women's movement made it possible to collect the data necessary to support an analysis of the government's responsibility for domestic violence. Finally, Part III explores the value and limitations of the human rights approach to combating domestic violence. We conclude that the human rights approach can be a powerful tool to combat domestic violence, but that there are currently both practical and methodological limitations--in part related to the use of the equal protection framework to assign state responsibility for domestic violence--that are problematic and require further analysis to make the approach more effective. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  8. 8
    275194

    WHO background paper: Obstacles to women accessing forensic medical exams in cases of sexual violence.

    Brown AW

    New York, New York, Human Rights Watch, 2001 Jun 25. 22 p.

    Despite the success of the women’s human rights movement in highlighting the issue of violence against women, many countries have yet to implement the necessary criminal justice system reform to ensure that, at the very least, wo men can pursue redress through the criminal justice system. This work must happen in the larger context of dismantling de jure and de facto discrimination against women. It is women’s second class status that makes them vulnerable to violence and bars them from receiving effective redress through the criminal justice system. Women’s rights activists all over the world are doing extensive work training police, prosecutors and judges to address pervasive bias and ignorance. A group of professionals largely untouched by this advocacy are doctors or other health professionals responsible for collecting, analyzing and testifying about forensic evidence in cases of sexual and gender based violence. In this paper, we call on the World Health Organization (WHO) to establish minimum standards for the collection of evidence in cases of sexual and domestic violence. We also call on WHO to draft a policy paper to support the effective implementation of the minimum standards. This paper should explore obstacles to the successful implementation of these standards such as discriminatory rules of evidence and procedure; the failure of states to criminalize specific conduct such as marital rape; and, the belief that only virgins can be raped. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  9. 9
    193319
    Peer Reviewed

    International infectious disease law.

    Gostin LO

    JAMA. 2004 Jun 2; 291(21):2623-2627.

    The International Health Regulations (IHR), the only global regulations for infectious disease control, have not been significantly changed since they were first issued in 1951. The World Health Organization (WHO) is currently engaged in a process to modernize the IHR. This article reviews WHO's draft revised IHR and recommends new reforms to improve global health, which include (1) a robust mission, emphasizing the WHO's core public health purposes, functions, and essential services; (2) broad scope, flexibly covering diverse health threats; (3) global surveillance, developing informational networks of official and unofficial data sources; (4) national public health systems, setting performance criteria, measuring outcomes, and holding states accountable; (5) human rights protection, setting science-based standards and fair procedures; and (6) good governance, adopting the principles of fairness, objectivity, and transparency. The WHO should ensure state compliance with health norms and generous economic and technical assistance to poorer countries. An important issue for the international community is how sovereign countries can join together to make global health work for everyone, the poor and the wealthy alike. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  10. 10
    186431

    The trafficking of women: a human rights issue. [Tráfico de mujeres: un problema de derechos humanos]

    Morada. Citizenship and Human Rights Program

    Women's Health Journal. 2003 Apr-Jun; (2):19-21.

    International trafficking of women for sexual exploitation is reaching alarming proportions, particularly in Latin America. The sexual trade of women constitutes a human rights concern which reveals the gross inequality between the sexes and the subordination of women on a global scale. An estimated four million people are victims worldwide of this illegal industry that generates US$7 billion dollars annually. The significant number of women from Latin America and the Caribbean who are engaged in prostitution in Europe, Japan and the United States strongly suggests the existence of trafficking for sexual exploitation. An estimated 50,000 women from the Dominican Republic, 75,000 from Brazil and 35,000 from Colombia work in prostitution in other parts of the world, and a large percentage of those women have been victims of trafficking at the hands of international criminal networks whose strategies are very similar to those of drug and weapons traffickers. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  11. 11
    185685

    Child rights abuse in Nigeria.

    Violence Watch. 2002 Oct-Nov; 4(4):1, 4.

    Children remain the instruments of positive change and development. According to Javier Peres du Cuellar former Secretary General of the United Nations, “the way a society treats children reflects not only its qualities of compassion and protective caring, but also its sense of injustice, its commitment to the future and its urge to enhance the human condition for coming generations.” Thus, the recent rejection of the Child Rights Bill by the Federal House of Representatives, is not only worrisome in that it is an outright denial of the existence abuse and exploitation in Nigeria, but also an irony it is happening in a democracy. It is indicative of the level of our development/growth as a nation in promoting the rights of disadvantaged groups. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  12. 12
    184832

    Angola. Struggling through peace: return and resettlement in Angola.

    Marques N

    New York, New York, Human Rights Watch, 2003 Aug. [4], 29 p. (Angola Vol. 15, No. 16(A))

    This short report is based on an investigation by Human Rights Watch conducted in March and April 2003. Our researchers interviewed over fifty internally displaced persons, refugees, and former combatants in the transit centers and the camps of Bengo, Bengo II and Kituma in the province of Uíge and Cazombo in the province of Moxico. Human Rights Watch researchers conducted twenty-one interviews with concerned U.N. agencies, NGOs and other organizations, including the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), the U.N. Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the World Food Programme (WFP), Oxfam-GB, GOAL, African Humanitarian Aid (AHA), Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF)-Spain, MSF-Belgium, Jesuit Refugee Service (JRS), Lutheran World Federation (LWF), International Monetary Fund (IMF), World Bank, Trocaire, Associação Justiça, Paz e Democracia (AJPD), Liga da Mulher Angolana (LIMA) and Mulheres, Paz e Desenvolvimento. Human Rights Watch researchers also interviewed Angolan central government officials and police, and conducted six interviews with local Angolan authorities in three provinces. Where necessary, the names of those interviewed are withheld or changed in this short report to protect their confidentiality. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  13. 13
    184839

    Croatia. Broken promises: impediments to refugee return to Croatia.

    Ivanisevic B

    New York, New York, Human Rights Watch, 2003 Sep. 61 p. (Croatia Vol. 15, No. 6(D))

    Between 300,000 and 350,000 Serbs left their homes in Croatia during the 1991-95 war. This report describes the continued plight of displacement suffered by the Serbs of Croatia and identifies the principal remaining impediments to their return. The most significant problem is the difficulty Serbs face in returning to their pre-war homes. Despite repeated promises, the Croatian government has been unwilling and unable to solve this problem for the vast majority of displaced Serbs. In addition, fear of arbitrary arrest on war-crimes charges and discrimination in employment and pension benefits also deter return. Human Rights Watch believes that these problems are a result of a practice of ethnic discrimination against Serbs by the Croatian government. The report concludes with a list of recommendations to the government of Croatia and the international community to deal with these persistent problems and finally make good on the promise of return. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  14. 14
    181166

    End child labour. Background information.

    EarthAction

    Santiago, Chile, EarthAction, [2003]. [4] p.

    In their Handbook for Parliamentarians, the International Labour Organisation and the International Parliamentary Union define child labour as "work, that is mentally, physically, socially, or morally dangerous and harmful to children; and interferes with their schooling by depriving them of the opportunity to attend school; by obliging them to leave school prematurely; or by requiring them to attempt to combine school attendance with excessively long and heavy work." In its most extreme forms, it involves children being enslaved, separated from their families, exposed to serious hazards and illnesses and/or left to fend for themselves on the million streets of large cities – all of this at a very early age. Article 32 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), an international treaty ratified by 191 countries, states that every child has the right to be "...protected from economic exploitation and from performing any work that is likely to be hazardous or to interfere with the child's education, or to be harmful to the child's health or physical, mental, spiritual, moral or social development." This clear, unambiguous language protects all children (anyone 17 or younger) from all forms of child labour throughout the world. It's important to note that the term “child labour" does not refer simply to any work performed by a child, but specifically to work done by a child that is considered detrimental to their growth and violates their rights. A child could attend school and still be able to work with their family part time to help grow food or learn a skill, activities which wouldn't be considered harmful. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  15. 15
    181165

    Parliamentary alert. End child labour.

    EarthAction

    Santiago, Chile, EarthAction, 2003. [2] p.

    Child labour refers to work that is dangerous or harmful to a child's health and development. Worldwide, an estimated 250 million children work as child labourers. Child labour is found everywhere, but especially in developing countries where it is part of the cycle of poverty, Bonded labour, virtual slavery chained by constant family debt, is common in South Asia. Child servants are hidden and abused in the homes of the rich in Latin America. Millions of children work long hours on plantations in Africa, or in factories throughout the world. Child labourers lose their health, their lives, and at the very least, their precious childhood meant for playing, making friends and learning. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  16. 16
    158447

    Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the sale of children, child prostitution and child pornography. Adopted and opened for signature, ratification and accession by General Assembly resolution A/RES/54/263 of 25 May 2000, not yet in force.

    United Nations. General Assembly

    [Unpublished] 2000 8 p.

    This document presents the optional protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the sale of children, child prostitution, and child pornography. This was adopted and opened for signature, ratification and accession by the General Assembly resolution of May 25, 2000. It demonstrates the concerns of States Parties on the rights of the child to be protected from economic exploitation and from performing any work that is likely to interfere with the child's education, or to be harmful to the child's health or physical, mental, spiritual, moral or social development. Elimination of these offenses will be facilitated by adopting a holistic approach that address the contributing factors and raising public awareness to reduce consumer demand, as well as strengthening global partnership among all actors. This protocol shall enter into force 3 months after the deposit of the 10th instrument of ratification or accession. For each State ratifying the protocol or acceding to it after force, the protocol shall enter into force 1 month after the date of the deposit of its own instrument of ratification or accession.
    Add to my documents.
  17. 17
    157560

    [International legislation on children's rights: application and obligatory status in Ecuador] Legislacion internacional sobre derechos de los ninos. Aplicacion y obligatoriedad en el Ecuador.

    Marquez Matamoros A

    Quito, Ecuador, Ediciones Abya-Yala, 2000. XXII, 294 p.

    This compilation of the complete texts of the Ecuadorian constitution and 20 international instruments comprising the UN doctrine on the human rights of children and adolescents provides structure for a dispersed collection to facilitate study and comparison. The 20 normative works include conventions, declarations, pacts, directives, and regulations, most of which were ratified or are in process of ratification by Ecuador. Article 163 of Ecuador’s constitution states that international treaties and conventions approved by the National Congress are incorporated into national internal law from their promulgation in the Official Register and take precedence over existing laws and norms. They are exceeded in normative force only by the Constitution. A brief introductory commentary discusses the doctrines that have informed legislation on children and adolescents during the twentieth century. Two sections compare in tabular form themes regarding children and adolescents in the Ecuadorian Constitution and the 20 international instruments, arranged according to terminology and by document. Two concordances identify the themes dealing with children and adolescents and their exact location within another 77 international instruments on related topics such as human rights, women’s rights, and the International Labor Organization. The concordances permit rapid search for any theme of interest regarding rights of adolescents and children in the two sets of documents. A summary table provides the date of adoption, ratification, and publication in the Official Register of each of the 20 documents.
    Add to my documents.
  18. 18
    106834

    Compendium of international conventions concerning the status of women.

    United Nations. Centre for Social Development and Humanitarian Affairs

    New York, New York, United Nations, 1988. iv, 186 p. (ST/CSDHA/3)

    This volume provides documentation and descriptions of conventions and covenants adopted by the UN General Assembly, the General Conference of the International Labor Organization (ILO), and the UN Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). The actual text is also given. The appendix provides a list of countries that adopted specific conventions. Special reservations to conventions and the nature of the reservation are provided by country in another appendix. All conventions pertain to the status of women and human rights. The UN Charter assures in article 55 and 56 the promotion of universal respect for, and observance of, human rights and fundamental freedoms regardless of race, sex, language or religion. Adoption of any international convention is legally binding by governments. International declarations or recommendations that are not legally binding are not included in this volume. The UN conventions pertain to the Convention on the Political Rights of Women (1952), the Nationality of Married Women (1957), Consent to Marriage, Minimum Age for Marriage, and Registration of Marriages (1962), and the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (1979). The ILO conventions on specific rights pertain to the protection of women at work (1919-35), night work of women employed in industry (1919), and the employment of women on underground mines (1935). Other conventions concern equal pay for equal work, discrimination in employment, maximum weights permissible to be carried by one worker, labor inspection in agriculture, protection from benzene poisoning, vocational guidance and training, and workers and family responsibilities, and termination of employment. UNESCO adopted a convention on discrimination in education (1960). The 1979 UN convention on the rights of women is the most comprehensive and far reaching and includes the suppression of traffic in women and exploitation of women prostitutes, political rights, and elimination of discrimination in employment and education. The aim of this volume is to make available the generally accepted standards for promoting equality between men and women and to give Governments a comprehensive basis for improving and enforcing legislation.
    Add to my documents.
  19. 19
    078936

    Resolution No. 44/73. Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, 8 December 1989.

    United Nations. General Assembly

    ANNUAL REVIEW OF POPULATION LAW. 1989; 16:124, 548-9.

    Resolution 44/73 of the UN General Assembly concerns the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of discrimination against Women, December 8, 1989. It begins with acknowledgements that one of the purposes of the UN is to promote universal respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms for all without distinction of any kind, including distinction as to sex; it notes the emphasis placed by the "World Conference to Review and Appraise the Achievements of the UN Decade for Women: Equality, Development and Peace" on the ratification of and accession to the Convention and acknowledges the 10th anniversary of the adoption of the Convention. After noting that the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women agreed to take due account of the different cultural and socio-economic systems of States parties to the Convention, the Resolution welcomes the ratification of or accession to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women by an increasing number of Member States, and offers a series of recommendations to further its goals, including the proposals of the Secretary-General for full funding of the Committee, and requests that the program budget for 1990-1991 provide for attendance at all the Committee's meetings by relevant professional staff from the Division for the Advancement of Women of the Center for Social Development and Humanitarian Affairs of the Secretariat, legal staff experts in human rights treaty implementation and adequate secretarial staff, and for the necessary facilities for the effective functioning of the Committee in order to enable it to carry out its mandate as efficiently as the human rights treaty bodies.
    Add to my documents.
  20. 20
    205816
    Peer Reviewed

    The Organization of American States and legal protection to political refugees in Central America.

    Yundt KW

    INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION REVIEW. 1989 Summer; 23(2):201-18.

    Since 1978, massive influxes of asylum seekers have placed great strain upon recipient states in Central America. At the global level, protection and assistance to refugees is entrusted to the United National High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). At the regional level, one would expect involvement by the Organization of American States with Central America refugees; either to supplement UNHCR activities or to enforce independent inter-American standards. This article reviews inter-American standards and agencies of concern for asylum seekers and refugees. Special attention is given to the inter-American human rights regime as the mechanism best suited to supplement or complement UNHCR activities in Central America. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  21. 21
    271346

    [Human rights and the convention on the elimination of all forms of discrimination against women-1979] Los derechos humanos y la convencion sobre la eliminacion de todas la formas de discriminacion contra la mujer-1979

    Plata MI; Yanuzova M

    Bogota, Colombia, Profamilia, 1988. 189 p.

    The most significant achievement during the past decade for women's rights has been the drafting and adoption of legislation on the "Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women" (1976-85). This document highlighted the practice of institutional discrimination which affected women in judicial and social patterns of behavior. Discrimination against women violates their fundamental rights of equality and respect for their human dignity. This is the basic premise of the UN document--that there is a minimally accepted behavior permitted between men and women towards women, and this must include fundamental and institutional principles that include and highlight women's fundamental and equal rights. This document cannot and should not be viewed as another one to have been ratified, but instead should be categorized as the "Magna Carta" for women's human rights. Unfortunately, this document can also become a smoke screen for those countries searching for prestige and approval from the international community and who ratify such documents for political approval and then continue to violate women's rights. The objective of this book is its contribution in researching and documenting the correlation between law, its practice, and women's judicial, social and economic condition. The book includes 8 chapters: 1) Decade of the United Nations for the Advancement of Women; 2) The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women, Human Rights, and Equality; 3) Female Prostitution; 4) Equality for Women; 5) Eliminating Discriminatory Practices in Marriage and Family Relationships; 6) Eliminating Discriminatory Practices in the Employment, Education, Health, Economics, Social and Cultural Sectors; 7) New Human Rights and Family Planning; and 8) The Convention.
    Add to my documents.