Your search found 42 Results

  1. 1
    326778

    Teachers living with HIV.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]. Inter-Agency Task Team on Education

    Paris, France, UNESCO, 2008. [2] p. (Advocacy Briefing Note; ED/UNP/HIV/2008/IATT-ABN4)

    Teachers play a key custodian role within the educational system. They serve as role models, mentors and guardians. They are also central to efforts to achieve the Education for All (EFA) and Millennium Development Goals (MGDs), as educational is seen both as a right and as a central pillar of efforts to eradicate poverty. Like all members of the population, however, teachers are susceptible to HIV. In countries with high HIV infection rates, most notable in sun-Saharan Africa, this susceptibly is increasingly noticeable. As more and more teachers die, an already weakened educational system is left with the dual challenge of increasing numbers of pupils and decreasing numbers of teachers. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    326777

    Mainstreaming HIV in education.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]. Inter-Agency Task Team on Education

    Paris, France, UNESCO, 2008. [2] p. (Advocacy Briefing Note; ED/UNP/HIV/2008/IATT-ABN2)

    Education and HIV & AIDS are inextricably linked. On the one hand, the chances of achieving crucial education goals set by the international community are severely threatened by HIV and AIDS. On the other hand, global commitments to strategies, policies and programs that reduce the vulnerability of children and young people to HIV will not be met without the full contribution of the education sector. Preventing and mitigating the impact of the AIDS epidemic through the education sector is critical, yet all too often responsibility for education and HIV has fallen under different spheres of authority. HIV and AIDS is frequently an add-on to the existing education system, rather than an integral part of education planning. A comprehensive sector-wide approach which mainstreams HIV and AIDS into existing education sector programs - taking account of the underlying causes of vulnerability to HIV infection and the longer term consequences of AIDS - is a crucial step towards addressing the epidemic. In addition, early mainstreaming actions in low prevalence countries may help to stem the surge of AIDS epidemics and reduce the likelihood that concentrated epidemics become more generalized. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    320246

    Keep your head down: Unprotected migrants in South Africa.

    Kriger N

    New York, New York, Human Rights Watch, 2007 Feb. 111 p. (Human Rights Watch Vol 19, No. 3(A))

    South Africa's vibrant and diverse economy is a powerful draw for Africans from other countries migrating in search of work. But the chance of earning a wage can come with a price: If undocumented, foreign migrants are liable to be arrested, detained, and deported in circumstances and under conditions that flout South Africa's own laws. And as highlighted by the situation in Limpopo and Mpumalanga provinces, both documented and undocumented foreign farm workers may have their rights under South Africa's basic employment law protections violated by employers in ways ranging from wage exploitation to uncompensated workplace injury, and from appalling housing conditions to workplace violence. Human Rights Watch has conducted research on the situation and experiences of migrant workers around the globe. Its research demonstrates that migrant workers, whether documented or undocumented, are particularly vulnerable to human rights abuses. Such abuses can be the result of many different factors includinginadequate legal protections, illegal actions of unscrupulous employers or state officials, and lack of state capacity or political will to enforce legal protections and to hold abusive employers and officials to account. The focus of this report is principally the situation of Zimbabweans and Mozambicans in South Africa's Limpopo and Mpumalanga provinces. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    309248

    Global reach: how trade unions are responding to AIDS. Case studies of union action.

    Perman S

    Geneva, Switzerland, Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS], 2006 Jul. 67 p. (UNAIDS Best Practice Collection; UNAIDS/06.23E)

    Global Reach: how trade unions are responding to AIDS is a set of 11 case studies which illustrate the wide range of responses by trade unions to the HIV epidemic. It is now well known that the workplace has vast potential for limiting the damaging effects of the HIV epidemic. Workplace programmes that protect rights, support prevention, and provide access to care and treatment can help mitigate the impact of the virus. Yet though the importance of the workplace and the role of employers is generally recognized, the contribution of working people and their organizations has often been overlooked. This report shows that trade unions, assisted by global union federations, have adopted a wide range of workplace responses to AIDS. These include challenging stigma and discrimination, addressing the factors that facilitate the spread of HIV, providing care and treatment, educating their members on prevention, and building worldwide coalitions that campaign for more to be done to tackle the disease. The case studies, based on the experiences of working people in Africa, Asia, Central America and the Caribbean, show that the massive memberships and well-structured networks of trade unions are a powerful tool in the response to HIV. Extensive networks of working people in different countries have been spurred into action by the crisis, and are involved in the development of national policy, global framework agreements, community projects, sectoral alliances and worldwide collaboration between governments, employers and trade unions. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    300913

    Report on series of workshops "Leadership for Results". UNDP in Ukraine. May, 24-31 2004.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]

    [Kyiv], Ukraine, UNDP, 2004. [61] p.

    The United Nations Development Program (UNDP) organized a series of "Leadership for Results" workshops on May 24-31 2004 to develop and boost leadership skills of several participants' categories: trade union leaders, public figures, physicians, women-leaders, Peer Education Program trainers, etc. Allan Henderson, who facilitated this workshop, pointed out that "these workshops are not meant to make leaders of those who are not leaders, but rather to provide the opportunity for people who already are leaders to step out of the day-to-day business and address their own development." The task for participants is to improve themselves and society, to get to the higher leadership level, to develop more holistic outlook and support leadership skills with more comprehensive background. The structure of this leadership workshop stipulates three meetings with three months intervals. Methods applied in the workshop are as follows: education (knowledge transfer); training (practice of skill development) and coaching (establishing new opportunities for the future). The first workshop on May 24-25 that UNDP held jointly with the International Labor Organization (ILO) welcomed over 70 leaders from four most active trade union associations in Ukraine. It was just recently that trade unions started paying attention to the problem of HIV/AIDS. For the majority of participants it was their first workshop. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    181166

    End child labour. Background information.

    EarthAction

    Santiago, Chile, EarthAction, [2003]. [4] p.

    In their Handbook for Parliamentarians, the International Labour Organisation and the International Parliamentary Union define child labour as "work, that is mentally, physically, socially, or morally dangerous and harmful to children; and interferes with their schooling by depriving them of the opportunity to attend school; by obliging them to leave school prematurely; or by requiring them to attempt to combine school attendance with excessively long and heavy work." In its most extreme forms, it involves children being enslaved, separated from their families, exposed to serious hazards and illnesses and/or left to fend for themselves on the million streets of large cities – all of this at a very early age. Article 32 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), an international treaty ratified by 191 countries, states that every child has the right to be "...protected from economic exploitation and from performing any work that is likely to be hazardous or to interfere with the child's education, or to be harmful to the child's health or physical, mental, spiritual, moral or social development." This clear, unambiguous language protects all children (anyone 17 or younger) from all forms of child labour throughout the world. It's important to note that the term “child labour" does not refer simply to any work performed by a child, but specifically to work done by a child that is considered detrimental to their growth and violates their rights. A child could attend school and still be able to work with their family part time to help grow food or learn a skill, activities which wouldn't be considered harmful. (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    181167

    Organisations in India that work on child labour.

    EarthAction

    Santiago, Chile, EarthAction, 2003. [2] p.

    In terms of absolute numbers, India has the largest child labour population in the world. It also probably has the greatest number of Civil Society Organisations that are doing first rate work at freeing children from child labour, getting them into schools and meeting their basic needs. The following list includes many outstanding organisations that work on child labour and related issues that Earth Action's Director met with during her visit to India in January 2003. (author's)
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  8. 8
    060440

    Statement from the Consultation on AIDS and the Workplace, Geneva, 27-29 June 1988.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Global Programme on AIDS; World Health Organization [WHO]. Office of Occupational Health; International Labour Office [ILO]

    [Unpublished] 1988. [4] p. (WHO/GPA/INF/88.7)

    Government, trade union, business, and public health representatives from 18 countries met in Geneva in June 1988 to discuss risk factors associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in the workplace, the response of workers and management to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic, and the potential use of the workplace for health education activities. The emphasis was on occupational settings where there is no risk of transmittal of the HIV from worker to worker or worker to client. Protection of the human rights and dignity of HIV-infected workers should be the cornerstone of occupational policy on AIDS; workers with symptomatic HIV infection should be accorded the same treatment as any other worker with an illness. Pre-employment screening for HIV infection is discriminatory and should be prohibited. Employees should be under no obligation to inform their employer about their HIV status. Any information about seropositivity on the part of individual workers should be kept confidential by the employer to protect the employee from discrimination and social stigmatization. To create a climate of mutual understanding, unions and employers are urged to organize educational campaigns. HIV- infected individuals should be entitled to work as long as they are able, and efforts should be make to seek reasonable alternative working arrangements if feasible. Finally, HIV-infected persons should not be excluded from social security benefits and other occupationally related benefits. Overall, the AIDS crisis presents employers with an opportunity to improve working relationships in a way that enhances human rights and ensures freedom from discrimination.
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  9. 9
    273136

    National Symposium on Labour and Population Policies, New Delhi, 15-18 April 1974: report.

    India. Ministry of Labour; International Labour Office [ILO]

    New Delhi, India, Continental Printers [1975]. 210 p.

    This is a report of the National Symposium on Labor and Population Policies organized by the Ministry of Labor in New Delhi from April 15-18, 1974. It was held with the active participation of the Department of Family planning and in collaboration with the International Labor Organization (ILO) with financial assistance from the United Nations Fund for Population Activities, (UNFPA). It brought the workers and employers' organizations of previous conferences to a common forum permitting discussion of the problems already considered by them separately. The Symposium, in which Family Planning Institutions and National Family Planning and Labor Managements also participated had, for its aim, to spell out the precise role to be played by the different aencies and to draw up a specific action program expressing the widest possible agreement of all the concerned parties, so that optimum results could be achieved. Population growth cannot be dealt with in isolation and must be viewed in the context of the overall social and economic policies of the country. However, the impact that unplanned population growth has on socioeconomic development and on well-being of the people cannot be ignored or belittled. The concern of the Symposium was population policies and family welfare planning within the organized sector as an important part of the overall national program.
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  10. 10
    002466

    Population education in the labor sector. [Abstract-Bibliography]

    UNESCO. Regional Office for Education in Asia and Oceania. Population Education Clearing House

    In: UNESCO. Regional Office for Asia and Oceania. Population Education Clearing House. Population education as integrated into development programs: a non-formal approach. Bangkok, Thailand, UNESCO Regional Office for Asia and Oceania, 1980. 1-9. (Series 1, Pt. 3)

    Abstracts are presented of materials that focus on the issue of population education in Asia's labor sector. The materials reveal that the efforts of mobilizing the labor sector to incorporate population education into their non-formal activities have revolved around trianing of workers, labor management, guidance schemes, production of materials, and provision of family planning services. Population education activities are being carried out through trade union movements, vocational and training programs, cooperatives, rural workers and industrial associations of workers reaching all the professional levels--managers or labor administrators to trade union leaders and workers. These efforts are documented in the manuals, guides, reports, books and booklets which have been abstracted. The International Labor Organization has facilitated the organization and consolidation of efforts of introducing population education into the labor sector at both the regional and the national level.
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  11. 11
    135696

    Training and capacity building for the empowerment of women.

    Bertino D

    INSTRAW NEWS. WOMEN AND DEVELOPMENT. 1997; (27):38-9.

    Because training is a powerful way to promote the intellectual and professional growth of people and the process of behavioral change, the International Labor Organization Training Center in Turin has engaged in hundreds of training activities to enhance the socioeconomic status of women over the past 17 years. An emphasis on the human rights of females in accord with International Labor Standards has led the Center to create an information kit on "Women Workers Rights" that has been disseminated worldwide through training programs. The shortage of remunerated jobs has meant that improving socioeconomic conditions for many women depends upon creating a supportive environment for women's entrepreneurship and self-employment. Therefore, the Center adopted the interventionist strategy of offering training activities that considered policies and strategies to develop women's entrepreneurship. The Center has also collaborated with many other organizations in the production of multimedia modular training packages that deal with such topics as 1) women and new and renewable sources of energy; 2) women, environmental management, and sustainable development; 3) the eradication of female sexual mutilation; 4) a socioeconomic gender analysis; and 5) the rights of women workers. The Center will also contribute to the advancement of women as it undertakes management of the UN Staff College and continues to support implementation of the recommendations of the Fourth World Conference on Women.
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  12. 12
    106834

    Compendium of international conventions concerning the status of women.

    United Nations. Centre for Social Development and Humanitarian Affairs

    New York, New York, United Nations, 1988. iv, 186 p. (ST/CSDHA/3)

    This volume provides documentation and descriptions of conventions and covenants adopted by the UN General Assembly, the General Conference of the International Labor Organization (ILO), and the UN Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). The actual text is also given. The appendix provides a list of countries that adopted specific conventions. Special reservations to conventions and the nature of the reservation are provided by country in another appendix. All conventions pertain to the status of women and human rights. The UN Charter assures in article 55 and 56 the promotion of universal respect for, and observance of, human rights and fundamental freedoms regardless of race, sex, language or religion. Adoption of any international convention is legally binding by governments. International declarations or recommendations that are not legally binding are not included in this volume. The UN conventions pertain to the Convention on the Political Rights of Women (1952), the Nationality of Married Women (1957), Consent to Marriage, Minimum Age for Marriage, and Registration of Marriages (1962), and the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (1979). The ILO conventions on specific rights pertain to the protection of women at work (1919-35), night work of women employed in industry (1919), and the employment of women on underground mines (1935). Other conventions concern equal pay for equal work, discrimination in employment, maximum weights permissible to be carried by one worker, labor inspection in agriculture, protection from benzene poisoning, vocational guidance and training, and workers and family responsibilities, and termination of employment. UNESCO adopted a convention on discrimination in education (1960). The 1979 UN convention on the rights of women is the most comprehensive and far reaching and includes the suppression of traffic in women and exploitation of women prostitutes, political rights, and elimination of discrimination in employment and education. The aim of this volume is to make available the generally accepted standards for promoting equality between men and women and to give Governments a comprehensive basis for improving and enforcing legislation.
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  13. 13
    109989

    The role of the organized sector in reproductive health and AIDS prevention. Report of a tripartite workshop for Anglophone Africa held in Kampala, Uganda, 29 November - 1 December 1994.

    International Labour Office [ILO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, ILO, 1995. vi, 138 p.

    About 100 people from various businesses, organizations, and governmental agencies attended the Tripartite Workshop for Anglophone Africa on the Role of the Organized Sector in Reproductive Health and AIDS Prevention held in Kampala, Uganda, in late 1994. Papers presented addressed the current extent of the AIDS epidemic, factors affecting the spread of AIDS in Africa, the impact of AIDS, stigmatization and human rights issues, experiences of the organized sector, and lessons learned by various groups. Lessons learned covered the cost-effectiveness of enterprise AIDS prevention programs, program sustainability, design of educational programs, counseling and support services, and family planning and AIDS programs. Four general papers were presented, ranging from socioeconomic effects of AIDS for African societies and for the organized sector to the role of the organized sector in the national multi-sectoral strategy for the AIDS control, e.g., Uganda. Employers' organizations presenting a paper were the Federation of Uganda Employers, the Zambia Federation of Employers, and the Employers' Confederation of Zimbabwe. Trade unions represented in presentations included the Organization of African Trade Union Unity, the Zambia Congress of Trade Unions, the Zimbabwean Confederation of Trade Unions, and the Sudan Workers Trade Unions Federation. The British American Tobacco Uganda Ltd, the Uganda Commercial Bank, and Ubombo Ranches Ltd gave presentations on their AIDS prevention programs for workers. The program director for the population and family welfare program of the Ministry of Labour and Social Security in Zambia discussed what this program is doing to confront AIDS. The conclusions of the four working groups are included in the annexes. These groups examined reasons why the organized sector might become involved in reproductive health and AIDS programs, the design and implementation of such educational programs within businesses, development and implementation of business policies related to AIDS, and care and support services within enterprises.
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  14. 14
    106105

    The family welfare programme of the ILO.

    Richards H

    In: Improving workers' welfare: a collection of case studies, edited by Hamish Richards. Geneva, Switzerland, International Labour Office [ILO], 1988. 1-32.

    In June 1967 the International Labor Conference unanimously adopted a resolution that underscored that trade unions and employers' organizations should play an important role in creating awareness of the implications of rapid population growth. In 1970, with the financial support of the United Nations Fund for Population Activities, the International Labor Office (ILO) developed a program. It was first introduced in Asia, where ILO sought to gain program acceptance from organized workers and to get institutions such as Labor Ministries, trade unions, and employers' organizations involved in the national population programs. Between 1970 and 1987 ILO population and family welfare programs had been operational in over 40 different countries involving 98 different projects. The ILO population and family welfare program promoted information and education activities on issues pertinent to developing countries: the pressure of labor supply, the welfare of the family, the current birth rates, and the future potential supply of labor. The family welfare aspect of this labor-population relationship had to do with family size (influenced by child mortality rates and child survival) and the optimum family size. The ILO program suggested to employers that economic advantages could result from introducing family welfare program. The ILO program became broader over time and developed into a general welfare and community welfare program. The rationale for family welfare planning in the organized sector was that these groups are the pace-setters for the rest of population. Guidelines for setting up family welfare programs for the organized sector address management, trade union leaders, personal services, and health services. Key elements in the implementation of organized sector programs are planning committees, worker motivators, record keeping as well as cooperation with outside bodies. The 12 case studies presented also indicate the diversity of organized sector programs.
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  15. 15
    106335

    The organized sector mobilizes against AIDS.

    Mehra-Kerpelman K

    WORLD OF WORK. 1995 May-Jun; (12):32-3.

    Representatives of English speaking African countries attended the International Labor Organization Tripartite Workshop on the Role of the Organized Sector in Reproductive Health and the Prevention of AIDS held in Uganda. AIDS has robbed these countries of lawyers, physicians, teachers, managers, and other skilled professionals, all of whom are difficult to replace. HIV/AIDS mainly affects persons in their most productive years (20-40 years) and in the higher socioeconomic groups. Professionals with AIDS become ill and die at a faster rate than their replacements can be trained. The young, less experienced work force translates into an increase in breakdowns, accidents, delays, and misjudgments. International and national efforts to control HIV/AIDS have not stopped the spread of HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). More than 8 million persons in SSA are HIV infected. 1.5 million in Uganda are HIV infected. As of October 1994, 30,000 persons in Zambia and 33,000 in Zimbabwe had AIDS. These numbers are just the tip of the iceberg due to underreporting. HIV/AIDS increases absenteeism among infected and healthy workers alike. It burdens the already existing scarce health care resources and equipment (e.g., in 1992, AIDS cases occupied 70% of hospital beds in Kigali, Rwanda). Unions, workers, and families must share knowledge about safer sex. The Zimbabwe Confederation of Trade Unions has had an HIV/AIDS education program since 1992. The Zambia Congress of Trade Unions strongly supports government efforts to sensitize the labor force and society to the effects of HIV/AIDS. The Federation of Uganda Employers has reached about 150,000 workers and more than 200 top executives through its AIDS prevention activities. Some company programs provide medical facilities for employees and their families. The Ubombo Ranches, Ltd. in Swaziland, a producer and processor of sugar cane, has a training-of-trainers program on HIV/AIDS and family planning for all village health workers and village headmen.
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  16. 16
    071573

    Child care: meeting the needs of working mothers and their children. Introduction.

    Leonard A; Landers C

    In: Child care: meeting the needs of working mothers and their children, edited by Ann Leonard and Cassie Landers. New York, New York, SEEDS, 1991. 1-4. (SEEDS No. 13)

    The overwhelming majority of women in the world work to make a living. In 1985 the female labor force amounted to 32%. In the developing world industrialization, urbanization, migration, and recession in the 1980's forced women to seek employment. In Ghana over 29% of households are headed by women. In the US 57% of women with children under 6 are employed. In Bangkok, Thailand, 1/3 of mothers were back to work within the 1st year of after childbirth. In Nairobi, Kenya, 25% of mothers were working when their child was 6 months old. Availability of child care is often scarce: in Mexico City during the recession of 1982 mothers were forced to take their child to work, or left them with neighbors or older children. Grandmothers live in only 15% of homes and extended family members in only 10.8%. A serious problem arises when older siblings drop out of school to take care of the young. Organized child care programs vary: in India a nonformal preschool program covers 25% of children aged 3-6. However, inadequate resources often result in operation of only 3-4 hours a day, no provisions for breast feeding, and custodial care instead of nutrition and health benefits. In India mobile creches at construction sites provide child care for female workers. The International Labour Organization fostered the classic factory day care facility, but transportation distances and costs have diminished the popularity of these. The community-supported model in Ethiopia has been successful, and similar projects are tried in Mexico. Child care workers are paid little: in Ecuador trained preschool teachers make 40% of the salary of primary school teachers; and in the US in 1989 they were earning only 30% of the salary of elementary school teachers. Better options for child care are needed for the safe and normal development of children.
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  17. 17
    069114

    Programme review and strategy development report: India.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, [1991]. vii, 96 p.

    Working to balance population growth with socioeconomic development, the Government of India has had a population policy in place since 1951. Net reproduction rate of 1 is targeted to be met by the year 2000. This paper present India's population policy, and analyzes overall strategy for achieving population goals. While strategy is basically sound, there are, however, serious problems with program implementation. Information, education, and communication activities, as well as population education are reviewed. Non-governmental organizations and organized labor are then examined in the context of their roles in overall population strategy. Programmatic review continues and concludes with discussion of integrated maternal and child health/family planning components, improving the status and roles of women, and consideration of institutional framework, coordination, and management. Specific observations and recommendations are presented for each of these issues and topics, as well as for data collection and policy analysis, and the coordination of population assistance. Future UNFPA country programs should expand already initiated projects, and develop new ones aimed at providing a wider array of locally available contraceptives. While past assistance has focused upon health and family planning, future programs may encourage other areas of population activities. Examples of such activities include demographic research and training, research and action programs in women and development, and experimental approaches to population education.
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  18. 18
    063126

    Population education in the organized sector of Sudan.

    Khalil K

    [Unpublished] [1987]. 22 p.

    Since 1978, the Sudanese Ministry of Social Services and Administration Reform, through the Public Corporation for Workers' Education (PCWE), has provided a workers' population education program in Sudan. Rationale for and description of the expansion of the program to the organized labor sector of Gezira Province in 1984-86 is provided. The program was expanded to the organized sector in hopes of sparking greater understanding and awareness of population issues, garnering trade union involvement, increasing acceptance of new family norms, increasing understanding of population size as it relates to quality of life, and developing worker motivators. The 1984 Working Plan included 10 seminars, 18 meetings, and 24 symposia over 2 years reaching more than 10,000 workers and family members. This level of participation represented a small fraction of the total target population, yet constitutes a limited, small-scale communication impact. The United Nation Population Fund (UNFPA) has funded a 2nd phase of the project.
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  19. 19
    064978

    Consensus statement from the Consultation on AIDS and Seafarers, Geneva, 5-6 October 1989.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Global Programme on AIDS; International Labour Office [ILO]

    [Unpublished] 1989. [4] p. (WHO/GPA/INF/89.21)

    In October 1989, WHO and the International Labour Office (ILO) organized a consultation on AIDS and seafarers. Participants included shipowners, public health professionals, physicians, seafarer organizations, and government representatives. They concluded that seafarers were not at particular risk since they work and live basically on ships for extended periods of time. Nevertheless conditions do exist that warrant special attention. For example, they are a geographically mobile young population living and working in a mixed cultural environment. This environment restricts their accessibility to health facilities and timely information and HIV and AIDS. Further, the nature of their profession limits social interaction on board ship and on shore. Therefore the consultation stated aims and objectives to help prevent HIV transmission and to promote the health of HIV positive seafarers on the job. Shipping owners and seafarer organizations should develop strategies together, and where appropriate, with governmental and other agencies to achieve these goals. The consultation recommended that WHO and ILO provide guidance AIDS health promotion, encourage its integration into overall health promotion, and support any regional pilot projects on AIDS health promotion. They should also establish a resource center and a network to disseminate resource packages with culturally sensitive material, such as video tapes and posters. In addition, these international organizations should reexamine current occupational health and safety regulations and medical guides for ships and the manner in which they are applied. Accordingly they should develop a seafarer's manual for physician use. WHO and ILO should widely distribute the consultation statement to relevant organizations. Finally, they should encourage national AIDS committees to tie in with individuals working on HIV/AIDS issues for seafarers.
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  20. 20
    064106

    1989 World Survey on the Role of Women in Development.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Centre for Social Development and Humanitarian Affairs

    New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. [2], vii, 397 p. (ST/CSDHA/6)

    This is the 1st update of the World Survey on the Role of Women in Development published by WHO. 11 chapters consider such topics as the overall theme, debt and policy adjustment, food and agriculture, industrial development, service industries, informal sector, policy response, technology, women's participation in the economy and statistics. The thesis of the document is that while isolated improvements in women's condition can be found, the economic deterioration in most developing countries has struck women hardest, causing a "feminization of poverty." Yet because of their potential and their central role in food production, processing, textile manufacture, and services among others, short and long term policy adjustments and structural transformation will tap women's potential for full participation. Women;s issues in agriculture include their own nutritional status, credit, land use, appropriate technology, extension services, intrahousehold economics and forestry. For their part in industrial development, women need training and/or re-training, affirmative action, social support, and better working conditions to enable them to participate fully. In the service industries the 2-tier system of low and high-paid jobs must be dismantled to allow women upward mobility. Regardless of the type of work being discussed, agricultural, industrial, primary or service, formal or informal, family roles need to be equalized so that women do not continue to bear the triple burden of work, housework and reproduction.
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  21. 21
    231833

    Setting norms in the United Nations system: the draft convention on the protection of the rights of all migrant workers and their families in relation to ILO in standards on migrant workers.

    Hasenau M

    INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION/MIGRATIONS INTERNATIONALES/MIGRACIONES INTERNACIONALES. 1990 Jun; 28(2):133-58.

    The author reviews the U.N.'s draft proposal concerning the rights of migrant workers and their families. "This article examines the nature and scope of obligations under the United Nations Convention and contrasts them with existing international standards. In the light of the elaboration of the U.N. Convention, the conditions of future normative activities to limit negative consequences of a proliferation of instruments and supervisory mechanisms are outlined." Consideration is given to human and trade union rights, employment, social security, living and working conditions, workers' families, expulsion, and conditions of international migration. (SUMMARY IN FRE AND SPA) (EXCERPT)
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  22. 22
    051227

    Report of the Director-General. Part II: activities of the ILO, 1987.

    International Labour Office [ILO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, [ILO], 1988. x, 93 p. (International Labour Conference, 75th Session, 1988)

    Part II of the 1987 Report of the Director-General of the International Labor Organization (ILO) summarizes progress in terms of standard setting, technical cooperation, and information dissemination in labor relations, workers' and employers' activities, social security, the World Employment Program, and training. Also included is a report of the situation of workers in the occupied Arab territories. The overall goals of the ILO's Medium-Term Plan for 1990-95 include the defense and promotion of human rights, the promotion of employment, continuous improvement of working conditions, and the maintenance and strengthening of social security and welfare. In view of problems arising from certain atypical forms of employment and new working time arrangements, the ILO's role in the organized, formal sectors of national economies will assumed increased importance. It will also be necessary for the ILO to increase its efforts to extend social protection to the unorganized, informal sectors of national economies and to promote the protection of groups such as women, migrants, and younger and older workers. The creation of productive employment and the alleviation of poverty remain the most significant challenges facing the ILO today. Among the milestones of 1987 were: 1) the 4th European Regional Conference, which addressed both the impact of demographic development on social security and the training and retraining implications of technological change; 2) the 74th Maritime Session, devoted to the profound economic and technical changes faced by seafarers; 3) the High-Level Meeting on Employment and Structural Adjustment; and 4) the 14th International Conference of Labor Statisticians, which adopted new standards designed to enhance the reliability of national labor statistics and their international comparability.
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  23. 23
    054916

    The changing nature of population education for workers.

    Richards H

    INTERNATIONAL LABOUR REVIEW. 1988; 127(5):559-71.

    The efforts of the International Labour Office (ILO) to educate workers in developing countries about population issues and family planning are discussed. "The author traces the evolution of ILO thinking from population control to family planning to family and community welfare and discusses the rationale for concentrating on the industrial sector, the programmes' orientation, content and methods, and the need to involve personnel managers and trade union leaders in particular." (EXCERPT)
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  24. 24
    038368

    [Rural-rural migration: the case of the colonies] Migracion rural-rural el caso de las colonias.

    Blanes J; Calderon F; Dandler J; Prudencio J; Lanza L

    In: Tras nuevas raices: migraciones internas y colonizacion en Bolivia [by] Carlos Garcia-Tornell, Maria Elena Querejazu, Jose Blanes, Fernando Calderon, Jorge Dandler, Julio Prudencio, Luis Lanza, Giovanni Carnibella, Gloria Ardaya, Gonzalo Flores [and] Alberto Rivera. La Paz, Bolivia, Ministerio de Planeamiento y Coordinacion, Direccion de Planeamiento Social, Proyecto de Politicas de Poblacion, 1984 Apr. 51-251.

    A study of colonization programs in Bolivia was conducted as part of a larger evaluation of population policy. The 1st of 8 chapters examines the history of colonization programs in Bolivia and the role of state and international development agencies. It sketches the disintegration of the peasant economy, and presents 5 variables that appear to be central to colonization processes: the directedness or spontaneity of the colonization, the distance to urban centers and markets, the diversification of production, the length of time settled, and the origin of the migrants. The 2nd chapter describes the study methodology. The major objective was to evaluate government policies and plans in terms of the realistic possibilities of settlement in colonies for peasants expelled from areas of traditional agriculture. Interviews and the existing literature were the major sources used to identify the basic features and problems of colonization programs. 140 structured interviews were held with colonists in the Chapare zone, 43 in Yapacari, and 51 in San Julian. The 3 zones were selected because of their diversity, but the sample was not statistically representative and the findings were essentially qualitative. The 3rd chapter examines the relationships between the place of origin and the stages of settlement. The chapter emphasizes the influence of place of origin and other factors on the processes of differentiation, proletarianization, and pauperization. The 4th chapter examines the productive process, profitability of farming, the market, and reproductive diversification. The next chapter analyzes the technology and the market system of the colonists, the dynamics of the unequal exchange system in which they operate, and aspects related to ecological equilibrium and environmental conservation. The 6th chapter concentrates on family relationships and the role played by the family in colonization. Some features of the population structure of the colonies are described. The 7th chapter assesses forms of organization, mechanisms of social legitimation, and the important role of peasant syndicates. The final chapter summarizes the principal trends encountered in each of the themes analyzed and makes some recommendations concerning the colonization program, especially in reference to the family economy and labor organizations.
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  25. 25
    044969

    Turkey's workforce backs family planning.

    Fincancioglu N

    PEOPLE. 1987; 14(2):33.

    3 agencies in Turkey are placing family planning centers in factory settings: the Family Planning Association of Turkey (FPAT), the Confederation of Trade Unions (TURK-IS), and the Family Health and Planning Foundation, a consortium of industrialists. The FPAT started with 27 factories 7 years ago, educating and serving 35,000 workers. The 1st work with management, then train health professionals in family planning, immunization, infant and child care, maternal health, education, motivation techniques, record-keeping and follow-up. Worker education is then begun in groups of 50. New sites are covered on a 1st-come-1st-served basis. This program is expected to be successful because newcomers to city jobs are beginning to see the need for smaller families, and accept family planning. TURK-IS has conducted seminars for trade union leaders and workers' representatives and provided contraceptives in 4 family planning clinics and in 20 hospitals run by Social Security, a workers' health organization. They have distributed condoms in factories and trained nurses to insert IUDs in factory units. The businessmen have opened family planning services in 15 factories, with support from the Pathfinder Fund, and hope to make the project self-supporting.
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