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  1. 1
    322015

    Strengthening the capacity of the public health workforce in support of the essential public health functions and the Millennium Development Goals. Consultation with experts, San Jose, Costa Rica, 16-18 August 2005.

    Pan American Health Organization [PAHO]. Health Systems Strengthening Area. Human Resources for Health Unit

    Washington, D.C., PAHO, Health Systems Strengthening Area, Human Resources for Health Unit, 2006 Dec. 50 p. (HR Series No. 45; USAID Award No. LAC-G-00-04-00002-00; USAID Development Experience Clearinghouse DocID / Order No. PN-ADJ-697)

    The main objective of this Consultation is to generate social recognition for the improvement and protection of human resources and the development of the health systems and well being of the populations of the Region of the Americas. There is no clear guiding principle in the conceptualization of human resources in health, or about its relationship to the PHWF. Human resources in health are currently facing a serious crisis, and public health should play a leading role in strengthening the capacities of this key resource in the Region. The causes and the magnitude of the problem are reflected in the lack of certain categories of personnel, the inequitable distribution of resources within countries, and institutional planning, management and education of these resources that are de-contextualized and focused on technical aspects. These considerations call for this presentation of the objectives of the Consultation to be accompanied by a recognition that learning to work together is not easy, but that this is precisely what is needed, i.e. the creation of strong partnerships, and the fact that public health work should be conceived in terms of cooperation in this area. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    098973

    India: country statement. International Conference on Population and Development, Cairo, 1994.

    India. Department of Family Welfare

    New Delhi, India, Department of Family Welfare, 1994. [5], 61 p.

    The country report prepared by India for the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development opens by noting that India's population has increased from 361.1 million in 1951 to 846.3 million in 1991. In describing the demographic context of this, the largest democracy in the world, information is given on the growth rate, the sex ratio, the age structure, marital status, demographic transition, internal migration, urbanization, the economically active population and the industrial structure, literacy and education, data collection and analysis, and the outlook for the future. The second section of the report discusses India's population policy, planning, and programmatic framework. Topics covered include the national perception of population issues, the evolution of the population policy, the national family welfare program (infrastructure and services; maternal and child health; information, education, and communication; and achievements), the relationship of women to population and development, the relationship of population issues and sectoral activities, the environment, adolescents and youth, and AIDS. The third section presents operational aspects of family welfare program implementation and covers political and national support, the implementation strategy, the new action plan, program achievements and constraints, monitoring and evaluation, and financial aspects. The national action plan for the future is the topic of the fourth chapter and is discussed in terms of emerging and priority concerns, the role and relevance of the World Population Plan of Action and other international instruments, international migration, science and technology, and economic stabilization, structural reforms, and international financial support. After a 24-point summary, demographic information is appended in 17 tables and charts.
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  3. 3
    068770

    Economic and social aspects of population ageing in Argentina.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    New York, New York, United Nations, 1991. x, 58 p. (ST/ESA/SER.R/113)

    With approximately 12% of its 1980 population over age 60, Argentina's elderly constitute a higher-than-average proportion of the total population when compared to other developing countries. Governments are increasingly assuming greater responsibility for the care and support of the elderly. Accordingly, this paper describes the social and economic aspects of population ageing in Argentina, with the aim of providing planners with a better understanding of the social and economic implications of these demographic changes. Better understanding should result in the development of appropriate plans and policies targeted to the elderly. While the ageing process in Argentina is comparatively advanced when compared to other developing countries, ageing presently proceeds at a slower pace when compared to past trends. Slow ageing is also projected into the future. The elderly, themselves, have been ageing, and tend to live to a greater extent in urban areas. Elderly women when compared to men are more likely to live alone and in urban settings. Despite a stagnating economy, social gains and improvements in living conditions for the elderly have been largely sustained. The working-age population grew more slowly, however, over recent decades than the total population. The number of retirement system beneficiaries also grew over the period, with retirement benefits reported as the leading sources of income among the elderly. The health care system remains strained by the country's present economic situation, with care failing to reach all of the elderly. Wide societal agreement exists that the family should be a major care provider. With more than 1/2 of all persons aged 65 and over living in extended or mixed households, the family plans an important care and support function.
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  4. 4
    231833

    Setting norms in the United Nations system: the draft convention on the protection of the rights of all migrant workers and their families in relation to ILO in standards on migrant workers.

    Hasenau M

    INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION/MIGRATIONS INTERNATIONALES/MIGRACIONES INTERNACIONALES. 1990 Jun; 28(2):133-58.

    The author reviews the U.N.'s draft proposal concerning the rights of migrant workers and their families. "This article examines the nature and scope of obligations under the United Nations Convention and contrasts them with existing international standards. In the light of the elaboration of the U.N. Convention, the conditions of future normative activities to limit negative consequences of a proliferation of instruments and supervisory mechanisms are outlined." Consideration is given to human and trade union rights, employment, social security, living and working conditions, workers' families, expulsion, and conditions of international migration. (SUMMARY IN FRE AND SPA) (EXCERPT)
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  5. 5
    051227

    Report of the Director-General. Part II: activities of the ILO, 1987.

    International Labour Office [ILO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, [ILO], 1988. x, 93 p. (International Labour Conference, 75th Session, 1988)

    Part II of the 1987 Report of the Director-General of the International Labor Organization (ILO) summarizes progress in terms of standard setting, technical cooperation, and information dissemination in labor relations, workers' and employers' activities, social security, the World Employment Program, and training. Also included is a report of the situation of workers in the occupied Arab territories. The overall goals of the ILO's Medium-Term Plan for 1990-95 include the defense and promotion of human rights, the promotion of employment, continuous improvement of working conditions, and the maintenance and strengthening of social security and welfare. In view of problems arising from certain atypical forms of employment and new working time arrangements, the ILO's role in the organized, formal sectors of national economies will assumed increased importance. It will also be necessary for the ILO to increase its efforts to extend social protection to the unorganized, informal sectors of national economies and to promote the protection of groups such as women, migrants, and younger and older workers. The creation of productive employment and the alleviation of poverty remain the most significant challenges facing the ILO today. Among the milestones of 1987 were: 1) the 4th European Regional Conference, which addressed both the impact of demographic development on social security and the training and retraining implications of technological change; 2) the 74th Maritime Session, devoted to the profound economic and technical changes faced by seafarers; 3) the High-Level Meeting on Employment and Structural Adjustment; and 4) the 14th International Conference of Labor Statisticians, which adopted new standards designed to enhance the reliability of national labor statistics and their international comparability.
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  6. 6
    054916

    The changing nature of population education for workers.

    Richards H

    INTERNATIONAL LABOUR REVIEW. 1988; 127(5):559-71.

    The efforts of the International Labour Office (ILO) to educate workers in developing countries about population issues and family planning are discussed. "The author traces the evolution of ILO thinking from population control to family planning to family and community welfare and discusses the rationale for concentrating on the industrial sector, the programmes' orientation, content and methods, and the need to involve personnel managers and trade union leaders in particular." (EXCERPT)
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  7. 7
    041924

    Population education: its place in work-related training.

    International Labour Office [ILO]. Population and Labour Policies Branch

    Geneva, Switzerland, ILO, Population and Labour Policies Branch, 1978. [12] p.

    This brochure, addressed primarily to International Labor Office (ILO) personnel, seeks to introduce the content and modalities of the population and family welfare education component of the ILO's Labor and Population Program. Whenever possible, training projects should include a presentation of relevant population/family welfare issues consistent with national policies and priorities. The content of such education should be directed at family-level relationships and the family well-being of individual workers. From the standpoint of the worker, the relationship between labor and population has 2 facets: 1) the pressure of labor supply (caused both by current birth rates and migration to urban industrial centers) and 2) family welfare and the standard of living. Workers must be shown that they can determine their own family size and, in so doing, they can increase their control over actual and expected material resources. The contribution required from a training program is relatively small. In countries where there is an ILO-executed family welfare education program, such trainers can be used to both prepare and present the new component in the basic training programs. In countries where population policies are primarily health oriented and implemented largely by health ministries with little participation of other sectors, the introduction of a family welfare component into an ongoing basic training program may need to be preceded by interdepartmental discussions and clearances at government level.
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  8. 8
    260044

    Mandate, scope and purpose of ILO population activities.

    CALDERON CD

    In: Population Education for Trade Union Officers. Diliman, Philippines, Univ. of the Philippines, Asian Labor Education Center, 1974, pp. 210-215

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