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Your search found 4 Results

  1. 1
    340897

    Emergency contraception. Fact sheet.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    [Geneva, Switzerland], WHO, 2016 Feb. [6] p.

    Emergency contraception can prevent most pregnancies when taken after intercourse. Emergency contraception can be used in the following situations: unprotected intercourse, contraceptive failure, incorrect use of contraceptives, or in cases of sexual assault. There are 3 methods of emergency contraception: emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs), combined oral contraceptive pills or the Yuzpe method, and copper-bearing intrauterine devices (IUDs). A copper-bearing IUD is the most effective form of emergency contraception available when inserted within 5 days of unprotected intercourse. The emergency contraceptive pill regimen recommended by WHO is either: a. 1 dose of levonorgestrel 1.5 mg, or 1 dose of ulipristal 30 mg, taken within 5 days (120 hours) of unprotected intercourse; or b. 2 doses of combined oral contraceptive pills (also known as the Yuzpe regimen).
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  2. 2
    332087

    Training and reference guide for a screening checklist to initiate use of the copper IUD. Second edition.

    Mueller MP; Lasway C; Yacobson I; Tumlinson K

    Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, Family Health International [FHI], 2009. 79 p. (USAID Cooperative Agreement No. GPO-A-00-05-00022-00)

    This training and reference guide was developed for family planning service providers interested in using the Checklist for Screening Clients Who Want to Initiate Use of the Copper IUD, commonly referred to as the "IUD Checklist." Designed to serve as both a training and reference tool, the guide is composed of two parts: a training module and a collection of essential, up-to-date reference materials on the copper intrauterine device (IUD). This guide is part of a series to train on other checklists. The IUD Checklist was developed to assist service providers in screening clients who have already been counseled about contraceptive options and who have made an informed decision to use the copper IUD. This simple job aid is based on the technical guidance provided by the World Health Organization (WHO) in its Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use (2004, updated 2008). The checklist supports the application of these guidelines -- known as the WHO MEC -- into service delivery practice. (Excerpts)
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  3. 3
    152999

    [World Health Organization (WHO) eligibility criteria for oral contraceptive use. Part 2] Criterios de la OMS de elegibilidad para el uso de anticonceptivos(segunda parte).

    Pozo Avalos A

    BOLETIN INFORMATIVO. 1996 Nov-Dec; (26):4-9.

    New medical criteria for IUDs and barrier methods defined by the World Health Organization in 1995 to reflect development of safer methods are presented. Health conditions are classified into four categories. Category 2 conditions need not restrict use of a method but should be considered when a method is chosen. Category 3 conditions require careful consideration of the gravity of the case, the availability of alternative methods, and access to emergency services, as well as careful follow-up. Many conditions that had been considered contraindications to IUD use are no longer regarded as risk factors with copper IUDs. Use is unrestricted for women over 20, smokers, the obese, lactating women, those with a history of preeclampsia, ectopic pregnancy, epilepsy, diabetes, and many other conditions. Age under 20 and nulliparity are category 2 conditions because of the risk of expulsion. Severe menstrual bleeding, under 48 hours postpartum, uterine-cervical abnormalities not deforming the uterus, and a few other conditions are in category 2. Category 3 conditions in which risks outweigh advantages include 48 hours to 4 weeks postpartum, benign gestational trophoblastic disorders, elevated risk of HIV/AIDS or HIV infection. Category 4 conditions precluding use of IUDs include pregnancy; puerperal sepsis or septic abortion; uterine abnormality incompatible with insertion; vaginal bleeding of unknown cause; gestational trophoblastic malignancy; cervical, endometrial, or ovarian cancer; pelvic tuberculosis; and sexually transmitted disease within three months. Almost all conditions are in category 1 and none are in category 4 for use of barrier methods, but their relatively high failure rates should be kept in mind. Allergy to latex is a category 3 condition for condoms and diaphragms and history of toxic shock syndrome is a category 3 for diaphragms.
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  4. 4
    061032
    Peer Reviewed

    Current concepts on the use of IUDs.

    McCarthy T

    SINGAPORE MEDICAL JOURNAL. 1989 Aug; 30(4):390-2.

    In the 1980s, a study showed an association between IUD use and pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and subsequent infertility. About the same time, 2 major manufacturers of IUDs stopped making IUDs. These 2 events caused a decline in IUD use worldwide. In Singapore, however, the decline began in the 1960s when the Family Planning Board withdrew the IUD from its 5 year plan. After that, researchers in Singapore 1st conducted randomized prospective trials of most new IUDs. For example in the late 1980s, they began a prospective trial of the MLCu380 with a complicated insertion system. Multicenter trails have demonstrated that at least 5 of the newest copper IUDs have a failure rate of <2/100 woman years and <1/100 for 3 other new copper IUDs. Some manufacturers have increased the area of exposed copper from 200-250mm to 375-380mm to increase efficacy, but a prospective trial in Singapore did not show an increase. A large multicenter trial has shown that the levonorgestrel releasing IUD (LNg20) has a very low failure rate (.12/100) and reduces menstrual loss, unlike the copper IUDs. Due to legal concerns over the medical grade plastic, however, the manufacturer stopped distributing it in the late 1980s. WHO hoped to identify a manufacturer for the plastic so further trials could begin around 1991. In the late 1980s, WHO studied the silver cored copper wire IUD used to prevent fragmentation. Since IUDs change the endometrium which suppresses intrauterine pregnancies but not extrauterine pregnancies, the risk of an ectopic pregnancy is 10 times that of a nonuser. The risk is lower in copper IUDs suggesting that copper ions reduce the chance of fertilization in the Fallopian tubes. The risk of PID in IUD users ranges from 1.5-2.6. The majority of IUD associated PID occurs within 4 months following insertion and in nulliparous patients with several sexual partners.
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