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Your search found 5 Results

  1. 1
    374076

    Guideline: iron supplementation in postpartum women.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Nutrition for Health and Development

    2016; Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2016. 38 p.

    This guideline provides a global, evidence-informed recommendation on iron supplementation in postpartum women, as a public health intervention for the purpose of improving maternal and infant health outcomes. The guideline aims to help Member States and their partners in their efforts to make informed decisions on the appropriate nutrition actions to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), in particular, Goal 2: End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture.
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  2. 2
    337733

    Controlling maternal anemia and malaria. Ensuring pregnant women receive effective interventions to prevent malaria and anemia: What program managers and policymakers should know.

    Maternal and Child Survival Program

    [Washington, D.C.], Maternal and Child Survival Program, 2015 Apr. [6] p. (USAID Cooperative Agreement No. AID-OAA-A-14-00028)

    This brief describes WHO recommendations for IPTp (intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy) to prevent MIP (malaria in pregnancy) and iron-folic acid (IFA) supplementation to prevent iron deficiency anemia in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) countries, with an emphasis on giving the correct dose of folic acid to maximize the effectiveness of interventions to prevent malaria. The brief is for program managers of health programs and policymakers to guide them in designing programs and developing policies. (Excerpts)
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  3. 3
    323034

    Iron supplementation of young children in regions where malaria transmission is intense and infectious disease highly prevalent. WHO statement.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, [2007]. [2] p.

    Iron deficiency with its attendant anaemia is the most prevalent micronutrient disorder on a worldwide basis. In 2001, the UN General Assembly at the Special Session on Children recommended that the prevalence of iron deficiency and anaemia be reduced by one third in children by the year 2010. If achieved, this would contribute greatly to the realization of the Millenium Development Goals. In most countries, national policies have been implemented to provide iron supplements to pregnant women, and to a lesser extent to young children, as the primary strategy for preventing iron deficiency and anaemia. Although the benefits of iron supplementation have generally been considered to outweigh the putative risks, there is some evidence to suggest that supplementation at levels recommended for otherwise healthy children carries the risk of increased severity of infectious disease in the presence of malaria and/or undernutrition. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    312384

    Micronutrients.

    International Food Policy Research Institute

    New and Noteworthy in Nutrition. 2002 Sep 13; (38):6-7.

    The high prevalence of low hemoglobin (Hb) concentration among breastfed Indonesian infants aged 3.5 months is related to maternal anemia, according to a study by Saskia de Pee and colleagues from Helen Keller International, UNICEF and the National Institute for Health Research and Development in Jakarta. They analyzed cross-sectional data from the HKI/GOI Nutrition and Health Surveillance System in rural Java from September 1999 to February 2001. The prevalence of Hb below 110g/l was a very high 71%. Comparing infants of nonanemic mothers with a normal birth weight, normal birth weight infants of anemic mothers were 1.8 times as likely to have a low Hb; infants of nonanemic mothers but with low birth weight: 1.15 times as likely, with the highest risk for low Hb predictably being those with low birth weight and anemic mothers (3.68 times). Other risk factors included maternal stunting, a young mother, and lower maternal education. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    311404
    Peer Reviewed

    Iron deficiency: Global prevalence and consequences.

    Stoltzfus RJ

    Food and Nutrition Bulletin. 2003; 24 Suppl 4:S99-S103.

    Iron deficiency is considered to be one of most prevalent forms of malnutrition, yet there has been a lack of consensus about the nature and magnitude of the health consequences of iron deficiency in populations. This paper presents new estimates of the public health importance of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA), which were made as part of the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 2000 project. Iron deficiency is considered to contribute to death and disability as a risk factor for maternal and perinatal mortality, and also through its direct contributions to cognitive impairment, decreased work productivity, and death from severe anemia. Based on meta-analysis of observational studies, mortality risk estimates for maternal and perinatal mortality are calculated as the decreased risk in mortality for each 1 g/dl increase in mean pregnancy hemoglobin concentration. On average, globally, 50% of the anemia is assumed to be attributable to iron deficiency. Globally, iron deficiency ranks number 9 among 26 risk factors included in the GBD 2000, and accounts for 841,000 deaths and 35,057,000 disability-adjusted life years lost. Africa and parts of Asia bear 71% of the global mortality burden and 65% of the disability-adjusted life years lost, whereas North America bears 1.4% of the global burden. There is an urgent need to develop effective and sustainable interventions to control iron-deficiency anemia. This will likely not be achieved without substantial involvement of the private sector. (author's)
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