Your search found 3 Results

  1. 1
    090601

    IMAP statement on voluntary surgical contraception (sterilization).

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. International Medical Advisory Panel [IMAP]

    IPPF MEDICAL BULLETIN. 1993 Jun; 27(3):1-2.

    Sterilization consists of occlusion of the vas deferentia or the Fallopian tubes to prevent the sperm and ovum from joining. Counseling is important since voluntary surgical and contraception is a permanent contraceptive method. Trained counselors should know about and discuss other contraceptive methods, the types of anesthesia available, and the different sterilization procedures and stress the permanent nature of sterilization and the minimal risk of failure. Counseling must maintain voluntary, informed consent and not coerce anyone to undergo sterilization. It is best to counsel both partners. Vasectomy should be encouraged because it is simpler and safer than female sterilization. Most sterilization techniques are simple and safe, allowing physicians to conduct them on an outpatient basis. Local anesthesia and light sedation are the preferable means to reduce pain and anxiety. In cases where general anesthesia is required, the patient should fast for at least 6 hours beforehand and the health facility must have emergency resuscitation equipment and people trained in its use available. Aseptic conditions should b maintained at all times. Vasectomy is not effective until azoospermia has been achieved, usually after at least 15 ejaculations. The no-scalpel technique causes less surgical trauma, which should increase the acceptability of vasectomy. Vasectomy complications may be hematoma, local infection, orchitis, spermatic granuloma, and antisperm antibodies. Spontaneous recanalization of the vasa is extremely rare. Postpartum sterilization is simpler and more cost-effective than interval sterilization. Procedures through which physicians occlude the Fallopian tubes include minilaparotomy, laparoscopy, and vaginal sterilization via colpotomy or culdoscopy. They either ligate the Fallopian tubes or apply silastic rings or clip to them. Vaginal sterilization is the riskiest procedure. Reversal is more likely with clips. So complications from female sterilization are anesthetic accidents, wound infection, pelvic infection, and intraperitoneal hemorrhage. About 1% of all sterilization clients request reversal. Pregnancy rates are low with reversal.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    780717

    WHO Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction: Programme on Sterilization.

    GALLEOGOS A

    WFAVS Report, No. 1, September 1978. p. 2-3.

    Research on female sterilization represents one of the priorities of WHO's Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction. The strategy of its Task Force on sterilization concerns safety, simplification, and service delivery. Evaluation of short-term sequelae of tubal occlusion performed postpartum or as an interval measure involved no major clinical problems. Concern over long-term sequelae has led to testing and comparison of 3 operative techniques - laparoscopic tubal cautery, Pomeroy tubal ligation, and laparoscopic clip application - in order to determine the extent of subsequent menorrhagia. A future study will be concerned with psychological sequelae, comparing women requesting sterilization for birth control; preoperative and postoperative general complaints of a presumed psychological origin, and patterns of menstruation and sexual activity will be recorded. New methods being developed include a technique that would safely and simply occlude the tubes by the transcervical blind delivery of a chemical agent. The most successful approach to date has been the use of methylcyanacrylate delivery through the tubes by a device designed for the purpose. A study is being planned for use of the technique with volunteer hysterectomy patients.
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    753681

    Task force on methods for the regulation of ovum transport.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    In: World Health Organization (WHO). World Health Organization expanded programme of research, development, and research training in human reproduction: fourth annual report. Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, November 1975. 33-36. (HRP/75.3)

    Methods of tubal occlusion being studied for use in developing countries are summarized. A comparative clinic trial will be undertaken in the CCCR network to assess safety of tubal occlusion by surgery when performed postpartum through a vertical miniincision and when performed as an interval procedure by minilaparotomy, laparoscopy, colpotomy, or culdoscopy. 8 chemical tubal occluding agents are being studied at the Central Drug Research Institute in India. Postcoital birth control methods are being investigated including: methods to alter the rate of ovum transport, methods of changihg oviduct motility (including the effect of steroids, catecholamine stimulating and blocking agents, prostaglandins, ergot derivatives, and oxytocics), and methods affecting ovum survival. A WHO Symposium on "Ovum Transport and Fertility Regulation" was held in June 1975 in San Antonio, Texas, to present the work of these various scientists.
    Add to my documents.